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Thread: "Capturing Infrared"

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    "Capturing Infrared"

    Earlier this week Bob, Jack & Guy were kind enough to post an article (part of a blog series) I'd written regarding infrared photography. Ranger Rick and I have been discussing the merits of different IR filters and color vs. black & white processing since then.

    I hadn't thought of it when I posted the last reply that I wouldn't be able to also add a sample or two; thus this new thread.

    One of the major reasons I enjoy shooting digital is the fact I can choose which way the finished image will appear; either color or black & white. Or a combination. While I sometimes miss the smells from the old wet darkroom, I find the newer digital darkroom is faster and much more convenient.

    My original thought when I began the response to Rick was to add just two samples however now that I find that I couldn't I'll expand. The first consideration is that all of the following images were captured with the same Sony NEX-7 (the one I bought used from Guy) which I had converted to capture in the 665nm IR range; the range that Life Pixel calls their "Enhanced Color IR Filter"

    "String Lake" is from The Grand Teton National Park, Jackson WY and was captured during an early morning hike last June. f/8 1/200 ISO 100 and a 12mm lens. It was processed using a combination of C1-Pro, Photoshop CC and NIK software. Much like everything I do, I let the image guide me to where it wanted to go. The finished result is the color in the sky.



    "Taos 1a" is from the area around Taos, NM and was captured early/mid morning last June. f/10 1/200 ISO 100 and a 20mm Sony lens.



    "Taos 1" is my favorite of the two and shows a combination of black and white as well as a hint of color. I think if I were using the 720nm or stronger filter I would have lost out on the ability to introduce the color that shows here.



    "Taos Tree" is located on the High Road to Taos that we passed several times and each time we shot this tree off a busy road. Seeing the tree for the first time I knew I wanted it in black and white and had I actually had a 720 filter with me I would have used it. Shot at f/11 1/160 ISO 100 with a Sony 20mm lens.



    In the end at least for me I enjoy the ability to process files either in color or black & white. I just recently sent a Sony A7r to Life Pixel for conversion and after several days of consideration decided to have it converted with a 665nm filter feeling that I can on occasion put either a 720 or 830 filter on my lens, thus giving me 3-IR converted cameras in one.

    I want to thank Rick for starting the conversation on IR and hope this continues it. I also hope this gives others some ideas who might be on the fence on IR.

    Don
    Don Libby
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    I'm sorry not to see more responses here as I would look forward to more information on experiences with IR digital capture. Thanks, Don, for your front-page piece, and I hope there will be more. I know there is a focus difference between visible light and IR. What I don't know, and would like to inquire, is whether the focus differs for different IR cut-offs -- 650, 720, 830 nm? Or might any differences from one cut-off to another within the infrared spectrum be so small as to be ignored, compared with the adjustment from where we focus for visible light? I have shot some infrared with a Sigma SD1 from which I have removed the IR-cut filter and used a visible-light-blocking filter with the lens, and really guessed about focus. I will also have to check what cut-off point my visible-light-blocking filter is at. Results were good enough to encourage me about further experimentation. --Barbara Armstrong

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Hi, Don,

    great idea for a topic !
    I'm shooting a Full Spectrum modified Panasonic G1 with different filters ranging from 600nm to 850nm.
    The G1 being a mirrorless camera, no problems with focus shift for IR. And, as the AA filter was removed during the conversion, the IR images come out very very crisp. Of course, they ask for adequate PP, but Lightroom in combination with NIK plugin Silver Efex Pro do a great job at that.

    Here's just one example (if you don't want other posters to show pictures, just let me know, I'll gladly take it down !)



    C U,
    Rafael
    E-M1/GH2/G1 Full Spectrum & lots of lenses
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/f6cvalk...th/9226689839/
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by BarbaraArmstrong View Post
    I'm sorry not to see more responses here as I would look forward to more information on experiences with IR digital capture. Thanks, Don, for your front-page piece, and I hope there will be more. I know there is a focus difference between visible light and IR. What I don't know, and would like to inquire, is whether the focus differs for different IR cut-offs -- 650, 720, 830 nm? Or might any differences from one cut-off to another within the infrared spectrum be so small as to be ignored, compared with the adjustment from where we focus for visible light? I have shot some infrared with a Sigma SD1 from which I have removed the IR-cut filter and used a visible-light-blocking filter with the lens, and really guessed about focus. I will also have to check what cut-off point my visible-light-blocking filter is at. Results were good enough to encourage me about further experimentation. --Barbara Armstrong
    Barbara, you are correct that IR does shift the focal point however I'm uncertain if it is filter dependant.

    Years ago way before digital was even a dream I experimented shooting IR with film and each (or almost all) of the lens then had a separate focal mark for IR. Fast-forward to a couple years ago, I decided to get a 35mm DSLR camera converted that I was no longer using. The company that I sent it to made certain that I also supplied the lens I was going to use in order to perform a focal calibration. After getting it back I found no difference with the focus as it acted as it should; I remember trying a non-calibrated lens and could see the difference.

    I contacted Life Pixel last year and spoke with them at length regarding converting the NEX-7 and found that since it was mirror less there would be no need for a calibration. No mention was made of different filter affecting the focus. Since then I've used quite a few different lens on the NEX and with each autofocus being spot on. I did experience a focus shift in using manual lens and was caught off guard when I did as I had gotten so used to the AF being good.

    The camera is converted to 665nm and I can also use a 720nm filter on the lens without any adverse effects. As a matter of fact I'm having the A7r converted to 665 as well so I can continue to have choices.

    Thanks for the comment and I should have something up either here or on our blog addressing the need for a custom white balance when shooting IR.

    Don
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by f6cvalkyrie View Post
    Hi, Don,

    great idea for a topic !
    I'm shooting a Full Spectrum modified Panasonic G1 with different filters ranging from 600nm to 850nm.
    The G1 being a mirrorless camera, no problems with focus shift for IR. And, as the AA filter was removed during the conversion, the IR images come out very very crisp. Of course, they ask for adequate PP, but Lightroom in combination with NIK plugin Silver Efex Pro do a great job at that.

    Here's just one example (if you don't want other posters to show pictures, just let me know, I'll gladly take it down !)



    C U,
    Rafael
    C.U. great image, I hope you continue to share!

    We had at least one thread from a couple years ago concerning IR however it appears to have fallen out of favor so I hope this with resurrect the dicussion.

    Don
    Don Libby
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    Super Duper
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Life Pixel is currently holding a photo contest of IR work. The winner will receive a conversion valued up to $775.

    I am only a customer of theirs and in no way connected to them in any way other than spending my money. Go check them out along with the rules by clicking here.

    Good luck to all who enter.


    Don
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Hi,

    if you use a DSLR camera, you need to have the camera/lens combination calibrated for IR focus. The calibration will be (theoretically) wave-length dependant. So, if focus is OK for 650nm filter, it will be off for 850nm.

    With mirrorless cameras, no such problem, since focusing is done on the sensor.

    When asked, I always give the advice to go for a full spectrum modification of the camera, and use external filters. Filters off Ebay are very cheap, and come in all kinds of wavelengths and diameters ...

    Here's another shot with the full-spectrum G1



    (650 nm external filter used)

    C U
    Rafael
    E-M1/GH2/G1 Full Spectrum & lots of lenses
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/f6cvalk...th/9226689839/
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thank you, Don and Rafael, for your additional posts. This is certainly making me think about how I might proceed with further IR shooting. I love the conversions to b&w where I have nice contrast to start with. Summertime shooting has always been somewhat dismaying as broad swaths of green hold little interest in a final print. But capture the same image in infrared, and it could be mistaken for a beautiful winter scene, with the greens appearing to be snow and tree trunks and structural objects interjecting a dynamic framework. Lots of fun. Also, IR renders beautifully at mid-day, just when we may be most likely to give up on "normal" photographic pursuits. --Barbara

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Just a brief (because I can never be short...) update.

    The Sony A7r was returned yesterday after being converted to shoot 665nm. In the short time I had available last night I tried out the 55 and 24-70 both of which look good.

    And on another note the NEX-7 IR has found a good new home and will be residing in WI soon.

    I'll have more to share shortly as
    Don Libby
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Don, very interested in B&W IR conversion of my A7R. I will do so when Sony introduces the next A series camera replacement for the A7R (probably ay Photokina this year). So, rather than sell the A7R, I'll convert it to IR.

    Do you need to use a filter with an B&W IR conversion? If so, does it cut the viewing light a lot? Or does the EVF gain, and show "what you see is what you get" when it comes to exposure?

    I'm very interested in B&W IR work in the Tropics where the trees won't be mistake for a winter landscape . I want to add IR to some of my Wedding gigs because it's so "Dream Scape" looking.

    - Marc

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Marc, I got the A7r back late Thursday and took it out for a test spin yesterday. I've done some very limited testing with the FE 55mm which look good as well as Sandys 24-70 which look equally good.

    I've included two sample from the 24-70, one in color the other in B&W; both were processed using a combination of C1-Pro, Photoshop CC and NIK. I had the camera converted to shoot 665nm which is "enhanced" color; some call it "false color". I can add a 720nm filter to the lens to get less color as well as a 830nm filter to shoot B&W IR; all depending on the subject matter and the look I'm after. This is the 3rd camera I've had converted and the third using the 665nm filter. I've always felt B&W conversion from either the 665 or 720nm filter just looks better than from shooting non-IR color then converting. The thing with shooting IR is that the WB is very tricky yet once you have it no problem.

    The real beauty of shooting with either a NEX7 or the A7r is that since both are mirrorless what you see is what the sensor sees so that's what you get. The tricky part is that you need to use Sony Image Data Converter to convert the RAW file to a Tiff before opening in either C1 or Adobe. I have however found that I can open a 720nm file directly in C1Pro and obtain a white balance with a color picker. Not sure on the 830 as I'm still waiting for that filter to arrive.

    The thing I like about shooting in IR is that with very little post you get an image that can have a rather "dreamy" effect either in color or B&W.

    I'm working on another blog article addressing using a 7r in IR which will also include information on lenses and how they play.



    "Fixer Up" Sony A7r FE24-70 (24mm) f/11 1/160 ISO 160 (handheld)


    "The Oaks" Sony A7r FE24-70 (24mm) f/11 1/160 ISO 160 (handheld)

    You might want to speak with Ken Doo regarding wedding shots in IR as I know he does some of that.

    Don
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Why do you need to open the files in the Sony raw converter rather than our usual suspects?
    I am not a painter, nor an artist. Therefore I can see straight, and that may be my undoing. - Alfred Stieglitz

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Ben,

    Since IR is capture in the red spectrum once you open the files in C1Pro or Adobe you'll see the programs struggle. The file will show for an instant as shot before the program takes over and since it sees the file as red convert it to red. C1 Pro has a little more room to work the white balance and in some instances you can get close to what you captured using a 665nm filter but not close enough. There's much more room when shooting 720 and I've been able to get a very near accurate WB using the color picker in C1 Pro. However not so in Adobe (I use Bridge to sort and open) as soon as the files load in Bridge you can watch as they switch from what was shot to what Adobe "sees" which is red. This is true in the case of shooting RAW and might be in the case of shooting Jpeg however I don't know as I never shoot in Jpeg. Opening a RAW file in (in the case of Sony it's a .ARW) the file looks red with the temperature pegged on the left at 2000 and tint at -74; there simply isn't any room to change. Convert the ARW file using Sony's program to a TIF and open the file and the tempperture is 0 as is the tint.

    I've converted 3-cameras now to capture IR and in each case I needed to "wash" the files in the manufacture software before working on them. All 3-cameras were converted to shoot 665nm. I've been playing with 720nm (and shortly with 830nm) by placing a filter on the lens. I've found the same thing going on with the 720nm as I did with 665nm. However, I also found that I can get near perfect color balance using the color picker in C1-Pro and expect to do the same with the 830nm. I've tried doing the same with Adobe and failed.

    Shooting IR you must shoot with a custom white balance otherwise you get crap. Opening IR files in any of the usual suspects won't work as the programs were all written to specifications that did not include looking at IR files; thus the little extra work needed.

    I'm in the process of working on a couple new articles for here and our blog which will address the need for custom white balance as well as shooting IR with the new Sony A7r and various lenses.

    Hope this helps clear it up a little.

    Don
    Last edited by Don Libby; 18th May 2014 at 10:49.
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Don,

    Interesting to hear of your white balance approach and use of native software vs C1Pro for example. Do you use an in-camera white balance calibration and use that as the 'as shot' or are you shooting the scene and setting WB from the RAW in post? In my own case with my IR converted Aptus 65M and Fuji X-E1 I always use a preset that I shot from grass on a sunny day as my reference point.

    With the false colour rendering are you getting a better and more intense rendering in the Sony RAW converter vs C1Pro? (This is the one thing I did notice when I used SilkyPix vs C1Pro with my 650nm converted Fuji XE-1).
    Ylem ...

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Graham, The camera came with a custom white balance however you know me, I just had to see if I could get it better. I also figured since the 7r has a place for 3-custom white balances I couldn't screw it up (too much).

    To me this is a little screwy - IR capture in a red spectrum yet a custom white balance for 665 and 720 should be shot using green foliage. I took a reference shot totally out of focus then went into the menu and followed the clues for shooting a custom white balance. And got an error reading. Just for kicks and gags I went and finished saving the setting to CWB #2 and compared with what Life Pixel gave me. The only difference was the temperature; 2500 from Life Pixel 2600 as shot. I also shot two-identical tests using both settings and much preferred #2.

    The really great thing about shooting a mirrorless camera is that you get/capture exactly what the sensor sees. I remember using the 1DSII and seeing what the lens saw and having to peek at the lcd - not so with the 7r; I hardly ever look at the lcd and in fact have it set at the faster rate possible which also aids in battery life.

    While using Sony Image Data Converter is a huge PIA (I'm on a 64 bit machine and it doesn't always want to play well and crashes a lot) the extra tie and effort in converting the files from ARW to Tif are well worth it. I've also found that I don't have to wash the files if I use the 720nm filter as there's less false color and what there is can easily be fixed back to what the camera actually captured using the picker in C1-Pro.

    Just re-read what you wrote about shooting grass and that's exactly the correct method. If I remember correctly I'll need to shoot a white card when I get the 830 filter. The way I see it is I'll have 2-custom settings; one for the 665 and 720, the other for 830 and keep the 3rd open for location specific.

    Don

    Note: As I was responding to Graham I also noticed I used the term white balance instead of temperature setting in the response to Ben. I've going in and edited it to read correctly.
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Here's one from the Full Spectrum modified G1 with a 650nm IR Filter
    PP included the 'midnight' preset from NIK Color EFEX Pro



    C U,
    Rafael
    E-M1/GH2/G1 Full Spectrum & lots of lenses
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/f6cvalk...th/9226689839/
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    a bit more color in these :





    C U,
    Rafael
    E-M1/GH2/G1 Full Spectrum & lots of lenses
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/f6cvalk...th/9226689839/
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    I'm not surprised that it is a clean green (e.g., grass) that should be used for white balance as, at least at the higher cut-off levels (those not yielding the false color effects), it is green subjects that render as white in black & white conversions. I imagine that this has something to do with green being exactly opposite the color wheel from red, but I would be happy to hear others chime in on this. --Barbara
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Hi, Barbara,

    I think it is the chlorophyll in the leaves that absorbs a lot in the blue and red parts of the visible spectrum, but reflects most of the green and IR. That's why our eyes see the leaves green, and the IR camera, equipped with the right filter sees them mostly white or light grey ...

    Chlorophyll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    But I could be wrong :-)

    C U,
    Rafael
    E-M1/GH2/G1 Full Spectrum & lots of lenses
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/f6cvalk...th/9226689839/

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Rafael, thanks for your response; it got me thinking, and I would like to understand this. I began to experiment with IR two years ago, with a Sigma SD-14 with the IR-cut filter removed (easy to do yourself on this camera). With the visible-light-blocking filter attached outside the lens, virtually all my data from the sensor was in the red and blue channels -- nothing or a miniscule amount in green. I got very nice conversions to b&w.
    Doing the same with the SD-1, I got much more information in the green channel, and felt the b&w conversions weren't as good. Obviously, the sensors in the two cameras, while both Foveon, are different -- more MP in the SD-1, just for starters -- and the readout from them must be different, too, I imagine, to result in this much difference in the files. I'm sure I need to do more experimenting, but anything anyone can add that would help me understand what is going on would be much appreciated. I have been using Channel Mixer in Photoshop for my b&w conversions. --Barbara

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Regarding "White Balance": I use Incandescent WB primarily to optimize my exposure, i.e. taming the IR highlights and bringing out the shadows. I rarely perform custom WB as using Incandescent WB gives me a more consistent output.

    Here is an example of Sigma DP IR emulating a Kodak Ektachrome Infrared film output:

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    For Sony NEX-3, custom WB is not really custom as the firmware limits the custom settings; instead, NEX-3 firmware gives suggestions on what temperature and tint adjustments to make. Hence, for me, it is much easier to just dial in the Incandescent setting and adjust the tint in post.

    NEX-3 IR with B+W 091 (630nm) filter:

    "The Windmills of Bangui"

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    My favorite camera for IR is a dinosaur, a Nikon D40x with 720nm filter. It is easy to set a custom WB and accepts all Nikon lenses - from pre-AI and of course, to the current AF-S Nikkors.

    There is something lyrical about the images that I get from this old relic and I am glad I kept it all these years.

    From last year's IR sojourn in Maguindanao, Philippines:

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    For post-processing, I go directly to the manufacturer's RAW processing software for initial adjustments of WB, exposure, and highlights/shadow adjustments.

    I find this approach useful whenever I shoot with my Sigma DP1. Foveon sensor is very sensitive to IR and even using manual exposure to severely underexpose my IR exposures, I still find myself needing to adjust the exposure using the Sigma Pro Photo to tame the IR highlights and bring out the shadows.

    I do like to emulate Kodak Ektachrome Infrared film and add a twist by making the images pinkish instead of the intense reds that Kodak EIR is known for.

    Here is an example of that approach:

    Manila Peninsula Hotel lobby

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Some great IR images here!
    Jack
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    Member Thor Lidasan's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Regarding focusing in IR:

    I keep in mind that focusing in IR deals with two "competing" light wavelengths - visible light spectrum and invisible light spectrum. If your AF system is calibrated to visible light only, then the AF focusing system will be confused with the preponderance of IR light, sometimes the image will be crisp and sometimes it will not be crisp. If your AF focusing system is calibrated to IR light, then often the focus will be spot-on. This is more often the case for the IR filters that have higher IR wavelengths cut-off, from 720nm and above. However, for IR filters that are below 720nm, I find that there are more visible light spectrum that tends to confuse the AF mechanism even if it is calibrated for IR. Again, this is from my experience lacking formal or technical data to show.

    For mirrorless systems in IR, I think even if you calibrate the AF system to IR, there is still tendency for the system to hunt and often the result is not something I am happy about. I usually shoot manual focus as I get sharper results using that technique especially with lower spectrum IR filters and concentrate my focus on the IR light rather than the visible portion, e.g. focus on the leaves rather than the objects that do not reflect IR.

    I shot this Central Park image about 5 years ago. This is a composite shot of a moon shot in IR and Central Park in IR. I was trying to imagine how Central would like under the huge Pandora's moon (remember the movie, Avatar?):

    "Pandora's Moon Over Central Park" (830nm IR/composite image)

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thor, what an image!! The creative side of your brain obviously operates very well. I enjoy viewing the moon, so this had particular appeal for me. I also want to thank you for your comments on focus; this is the aspect of IR that I most need to figure out. --Barbara

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    Member Thor Lidasan's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thank you, Barbara!

    More on IR-focusing:

    I did find that getting to know the lens quirks in IR focusing helps me a lot. Some lens you have to slightly adjust the distance scale closer to you after acquiring focus. How close depends on experimentation, a couple of feet or what I call a very slight twist of the focusing ring. Infinity on the lens is not infinity in IR, again this is a thought on my part.

    On my Sigma DP1, I mounted an optical viewfinder on top of the camera just for the purposes of composition alone. The LCD is useless once you mount an IR filter on the lens. I set it manual focus at f/8 with distance at 5 feet with focal length set at its widest setting, the camera is good to go.

    Sigma DP1 in Central Park (with B+W 091):



    On my Nikon D40x, my go to lens is the Nikkor 18-70. It has a slight hot spot but it makes up for the color rendition and consistency in terms of focus as long as I keep the focus point on an IR reflecting (emitting?) object:

    Nikon D40x in Staten Island (with 720nm filter):



    On my NEX-3 IR, what is usually mounted is the Nikkor 28mm 3.5 because the lens is such an IR-focus friendly. I set it at f/16 and I am usually ok with hyperfocal focusing technique (set the distance and forget it) even with a very dark filter such as an 830nm.

    Here is a sunstar IR output from the manually-focused Nikkor 28mm on an NEX-3 full-spectrum:

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    The 830nm filter arrived and I promptly went to test it.

    It turned out to be an excellent learning tool for me. Normally, I shoot nothing but 665nm however I've begun to shoot 720 and now 830nm. In the past I'd create a custom white balance and forget about it. "Set it and forget it". Not so when using different filters. While I think I can "get by" using the same custom white balance for both the 665 and 720 I'm going to set one for each just like I did for the 830. Thankfully the A7r has 3-seperate custom white balance settings.





    I've also found that shooting with a mirrorless camera focus is not an issue. Except when you use either a manual focus lens or switch from auto to manual focus. So the worry of having a lens calibrated to a mirrorless camera is needless.

    Thor, love the images bud!

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    Member Thor Lidasan's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thanks, Don!

    I wonder if there is a difference in the histograms when you use the CWB of 665nm with the 830nm filter mounted and CWB of 830nm. With the 830nm, all the RGB channels of the histogram are almost equally filled with data unlike the lower cut-off IR filter where it is usually red channel heavy.

    Here's one from Staten Island with 720nm shot via D40x:

    "Aftermath"

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    For a test, I made a short timelapse video of the clouds above our garden.
    Timelapse made in Lightroom

    timelapsewolken - YouTube

    C U,
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    The 830nm filter arrived and I promptly went to test it.

    It turned out to be an excellent learning tool for me. Normally, I shoot nothing but 665nm however I've begun to shoot 720 and now 830nm. In the past I'd create a custom white balance and forget about it. "Set it and forget it". Not so when using different filters. While I think I can "get by" using the same custom white balance for both the 665 and 720 I'm going to set one for each just like I did for the 830. Thankfully the A7r has 3-seperate custom white balance settings.

    Don
    Don,

    I definitely find that 830nm requires it's own custom white balance. Instant B&W too at that cut off. My favourite actually on my full spectrum cameras and I may convert another Fuji to just that spectrum. Great for solid blacks and balanced spectrum.

    Some wild IR images here!
    Ylem ...
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Thor Lidasan View Post

    Nikon D40x in Staten Island (with 720nm filter):



    ]
    Excellent! I love it.
    Ylem ...
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Decided to do a little extermination using a Phase One 80mm /2.8 lens. Working with this lens in the past before I had the camera converted I knew that I didn't have any control over the f/stop however I had plenty of control using a combination of ISO and shutter. I also decided to see what I could accomplish using a 830nm lens filter.

    I open the files in C1 Pro using the color picker did a white balance then converted to black and white. I saved the file as a Tiff before sending it to Photoshop CC and adjusting the individual channels in Levels.

    I also washed the files in Sony Image Data Converter converting the files from .ARW to TIF before opening them in Photoshop CC. Once there I opened NIK software using Silver Efex Pro before working on the channels in Levels like I did with the C1Pro files.

    In the end it's a toss up on which workflow I like better....


    Manual focusing did okay here. C1Pro file before PS CC and working the channels in levels.


    File processed in PS CC and NIK Silver Efex Pro.


    C1Pro file before PS CC and working the channels in levels.


    File processed in PS CC and NIK Silver Efex Pro and tweaking the channels in levels.
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    Senior Member alajuela's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Decided to do a little extermination using a Phase One 80mm /2.8 lens. Working with this lens in the past before I had the camera converted I knew that I didn't have any control over the f/stop however I had plenty of control using a combination of ISO and shutter. I also decided to see what I could accomplish using a 830nm lens filter.

    I open the files in C1 Pro using the color picker did a white balance then converted to black and white. I saved the file as a Tiff before sending it to Photoshop CC and adjusting the individual channels in Levels.

    I also washed the files in Sony Image Data Converter converting the files from .ARW to TIF before opening them in Photoshop CC. Once there I opened NIK software using Silver Efex Pro before working on the channels in Levels like I did with the C1Pro files.

    In the end it's a toss up on which workflow I like better....


    Manual focusing did okay here. C1Pro file before PS CC and working the channels in levels.


    File processed in PS CC and NIK Silver Efex Pro.


    C1Pro file before PS CC and working the channels in levels.


    File processed in PS CC and NIK Silver Efex Pro and tweaking the channels in levels.
    Hi Don

    I like the second one on both of them!!

    best

    Phil

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thank you Phil, Did one more this time processed entirely in C1Pro. The only thing I did in PS was crop at 100% and add the watermark. I feel this is the best one.




    I feel spending some quality time in C1Pro when using the 830nm filter will get me excellent results.


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    Super Moderator Cindy Flood's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Don's Nex7 is now mine, and I'm enjoying getting to know it. Here is one with it and the 12mm Zeiss Touit. False Color and Black and white (via Silver Efex Pro).




    I have had a 665nm converted G1 for 4 or 5 years. Here are a some from it:



















    I think that the beauty of the 665nm conversion lies in the fact that you have some color information to use to make adjustments while converting to black and white, along with the obvious ability to use the false colors when desired. You can then just screw on a 772nm or 830nm filter and have those two cut-off points available as well.

    I recently read an article that explained how to make a LR preset using Adobe's free DNGProfile editor that eliminates having to use the cameras Proprietary software to "wash" the file in order to set the correct white balance. You can read about that here: Setting White Balance on Infrared Images with Lightroom (with video) | Luminescence of Nature Photography. Now I can just stick to my regular LR workflow, and just add the preset to the files.
    Last edited by Cindy Flood; 28th May 2014 at 13:27.
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thanks Cindy, I looked at the link and will see if I can't adapt it to PS. Glad the camera went to a good new home; by the way really like the first image.

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Thank you Phil, Did one more this time processed entirely in C1Pro. The only thing I did in PS was crop at 100% and add the watermark. I feel this is the best one.




    I feel spending some quality time in C1Pro when using the 830nm filter will get me excellent results.


    Don
    Hi Don

    AGREE!! I really like the "flower" the definition w/o overpowering sharpness.

    Best

    Phil

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"



    I like this one the best - My opinion is that is great!!. I love the framing and the feeling!!

    I would like to mention, I have had a 5D I converted to 680 (+/-) by life pixel, and now a P45+ / full spectrum from CI, and just did a Fuji to full spectrum. On the issue of WB, I played with these settings for a while
    DXO - 2148 / -100
    ACR = 2000 / -51
    C1 = 1808 / -50

    Also brought in the files in C1 with B+W turned on and off , my conclusion is playing and setting the WB is an enjoyable part of the image making. Is interesting to chose different parts of the image to get started on the creative journey.

    Best

    Phil
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Thank you, Phil.

    I always was able to set a new WB every time with my G1, but the Sony is giving me an error message, so I'm going with what LifePixel set, so far. The only thing that the preset does is give me more lattitude to set the white balance in post.

    The thing that I like most about shooting infrared is that you never know where the photo will be going as you start to work on it. Like Don said on the front page, the photo kind of tells you where to go. The discovery is the fun part.

    Quote Originally Posted by alajuela View Post


    I like this one the best - My opinion is that is great!!. I love the framing and the feeling!!

    I would like to mention, I have had a 5D I converted to 680 (+/-) by life pixel, and now a P45+ / full spectrum from CI, and just did a Fuji to full spectrum. On the issue of WB, I played with these settings for a while
    DXO - 2148 / -100
    ACR = 2000 / -51
    C1 = 1808 / -50

    Also brought in the files in C1 with B+W turned on and off , my conclusion is playing and setting the WB is an enjoyable part of the image making. Is interesting to chose different parts of the image to get started on the creative journey.

    Best

    Phil
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Cindy, as well as anyone working with either a NEX-7 or 7R...

    I got the same error message with both systems when I tried to set a custom white balance. It wasn't until after I no longer had the NEX-7 that I found the secret. I'd shoot the green blurry image file then go to the custom white balance and follow the instructions (basically hit the enter button in the middle of the wheel). This will give you the error message yet at the same time you'll see a section where it asks which of the 3-custom WB you want to save to. At least this happens on my 7R. I did a custom WB for the 830nm got the error msg yet was able to save it in position 3. I checked it and yes its there. I did the same for the 720 and again for the 665. This works for the 7r so it should work for the NEX7.

    I tried this on Sandy's non-converted 7r and it works as advertised (without an error msg) so it makes me think that the setting is valid for IR yet since the sensor has been changed to IR the firmware that houses the custom white balance sees it as an error. Try it - it should works on the NEX7 as it certainly work on my 7r IR. Wish I had tried it with NEX...

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    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Mr boring ... IR faux colour but I liked the B&W rendering

    Fuji X-E1 650nm, 1/15s f/16 ISO 200
    Ylem ...
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    Member Thor Lidasan's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    From Boracay Islands, Philippines via 720nm filter:

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Will do that, Don. Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Cindy, as well as anyone working with either a NEX-7 or 7R...

    I got the same error message with both systems when I tried to set a custom white balance. It wasn't until after I no longer had the NEX-7 that I found the secret. I'd shoot the green blurry image file then go to the custom white balance and follow the instructions (basically hit the enter button in the middle of the wheel). This will give you the error message yet at the same time you'll see a section where it asks which of the 3-custom WB you want to save to. At least this happens on my 7R. I did a custom WB for the 830nm got the error msg yet was able to save it in position 3. I checked it and yes its there. I did the same for the 720 and again for the 665. This works for the 7r so it should work for the NEX7.

    I tried this on Sandy's non-converted 7r and it works as advertised (without an error msg) so it makes me think that the setting is valid for IR yet since the sensor has been changed to IR the firmware that houses the custom white balance sees it as an error. Try it - it should works on the NEX7 as it certainly work on my 7r IR. Wish I had tried it with NEX...

    Don

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Thor Lidasan View Post
    NEX-3 IR with B+W 091 (630nm) filter:

    "The Windmills of Bangui"

    Great image Thor! Reminds me of the dystopic movie Mad Max. Great color and detail.
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Cindy, still love that first image you shared from the NEX-7, the sky is beautiful and the mix of colors in the trees work very well. Glad you didn't crop out the bench.

    The Ice Cream Social reminds me of a much old time.

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    Mr boring ... IR faux colour but I liked the B&W rendering

    Fuji X-E1 650nm, 1/15s f/16 ISO 200


    Graham I'll start calling you "Mr Boring" now...

    This is damn near perfect! The only thing that would have made it better in my opinion is that I took it instead of you!

    Is that a dust cloud in the distance? Oh and will you share where this was taken?

    Don


    A lot of great talent here folks!
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    Member Thor Lidasan's Avatar
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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Great image Thor! Reminds me of the dystopic movie Mad Max. Great color and detail.
    Thanks, Don!

    I do enjoy shooting IR. The freedom to defy our conventional ideas about color schemes is one of the reason why I gravitated towards IR.

    I do indulge in B&W IR also, so here's one from your neck of the woods, Grand Canyon, Arizona:

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    Re: "Capturing Infrared"

    Quote Originally Posted by Thor Lidasan View Post
    Thanks, Don!

    I do enjoy shooting IR. The freedom to defy our conventional ideas about color schemes is one of the reason why I gravitated towards IR.

    I do indulge in B&W IR also, so here's one from your neck of the woods, Grand Canyon, Arizona:
    WOW!
    Last edited by Don Libby; 30th May 2014 at 09:14.
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