Site Sponsors
Results 1 to 39 of 39

Thread: Adventures in pano stitching

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Adventures in pano stitching

    I decided to try may hand at some panoramic stitching using my GH1. I figured out the nodal point of the 14-45 lens the night before using a macro rail. Using Photoshop CS4 to do the stitching. Here's my first attempt in San Diego harbor. I think it's not too bad.

    Panasonic GH1+14-45mm @ 14mm; ISO 200; f/11 @ 1/500s; 7 exposures @30% overlap


    Please feel free to comment, and to add your own pano stitch composures =).

    EDIT: guess you can't pull up the photo as I uploaded it on Flickr because I'm a cheapskate and haven't upgraded to the Pro account yet =/
    Last edited by photoSmart42; 22nd March 2010 at 15:35.
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  2. #2
    Senior Member ggibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    743
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Nice work! Pano-stitching can be difficult to match exposures sky or water (basically any gradient). Here are a couple I did with the 20mm (before I picked up the 7-14mm):




  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by ggibson View Post
    Nice work! Pano-stitching can be difficult to match exposures sky or water (basically any gradient).
    Thanks! Likewise!

    I've been reading a lot about proper techniques for doing pano stitching, so I ended up leaving my camera in manual mode after setting the f-stop I wanted and setting the exposure to the average level across the scene I wanted to capture. After that, I did area focus for every shot, with a 2-second timer to eliminate any vibrations from moving the camera around.
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Posts
    1,309
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Hi Dragos,

    I think your technique for taking the pano is about the same I use. "area focus for every shot" can work unless you experiment with shorter distances. I try to avoid it. Did you try different projection methods when stitching?

    I like stitching. It is like making a bigger sensor in the post processing, and as a life saver when you haven't brought the right lens for the job. I sometimes use it for land- or cityscapes for the traditional wider shot but here are two other ones:


    Above: G1, Zuiko OM50/2 Macro, handheld, 2 images just to cover the scene. It was about -7 degrees Celsius and there was spraying water so I didn't care for switching lens. I also had a shorter shutter time for the top part to handle the DR.


    The image above is over 30 exposures with hefty overlap. I was out walking with one lens only. The light happened to be right for the building and I fired away. The grid overlay is great (I just wish one could turn it grey instead of the intense white). Here is the initial result before further processing:


    Good luck with the panos, I think it is fun and rewarding.

    /Jonas

  5. #5
    jwestra
    Guest

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Really good nice! Might save me some money on a wide angle lens. Is Photoshop the best software to do this? Or is special software like panoramo editor in the example above more suitable?

  6. #6
    Senior Member pellicle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Southport, Australia
    Posts
    1,429
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Jonas's post doesn't explicitly plug PTGui, but it is the best.

    Fantastic

    my suggestion is manual exposure (to prevent any exposure drifts) and pick either a specific white balance or do your own custom or shoot in RAW and convert to whatever you want.


    click for larger


    4 images taken with FD50mm @ 5.6

  7. #7
    jwestra
    Guest

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Thank you, I just downloaded the trail version. I should also avoid refocussing right?

  8. #8
    Member sangio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    24

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by pellicle View Post
    Jonas's post doesn't explicitly plug PTGui, but it is the best.

    Fantastic

    my suggestion is manual exposure (to prevent any exposure drifts) and pick either a specific white balance or do your own custom or shoot in RAW and convert to whatever you want.


    4 images taken with FD50mm @ 5.6

    I would add using manual focus at one preset distance to Pellicle's suggestions.
    Photoshop Elements has a stitching feature that works quite well. The attached was stitched together from 14 images in a 2x7 array. The horizontal FOV is approx 220 degrees.

    regards; Santo

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas View Post
    Hi Dragos,

    I think your technique for taking the pano is about the same I use. "area focus for every shot" can work unless you experiment with shorter distances. I try to avoid it. Did you try different projection methods when stitching?
    Hi, Jonas. I should add that I set my white balance manually also, so I think that helped keep the exposure levels true across the entire scene. The only 'automatic' feature I had enabled was the focus. Area focus seemed to work OK, but I'll have to look at the details in the photos to see how they came out at that level.

    I haven't tried other projection methods for stitching yet. The tutorial I was reading suggested starting out with the default projection in PS4, so that's what I used. I'll play with other projection methods as well. I did look at trying PTGui, and I'll download the trial to see how the end result would be different for the shots I took.

    BTW, your pano of that building is awesome! Looks like it was shot using a LF view camera. Very nice!
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Here's another pano from San Diego harbor.

    Panasonic GH1+14-45mm @ 45mm; ISO 200; f/11 @ 1/640s; 9 exposures @30% overlap
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  11. #11
    Senior Member pellicle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Southport, Australia
    Posts
    1,429
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Hi

    Quote Originally Posted by jwestra View Post
    Thank you, I just downloaded the trail version. I should also avoid refocussing right?
    well, it depends ... as Jonas suggested above he got some sort of "tilt" focus effect by having the focal plane essentially altered as his images "panned" down and also used differing exposures (probably not by much).

    I suggest that the only 'rules' are ones you see don't look right ... experiment experiment experiment

    of course with wider angles focus is a lesser influence.

    An old acquaintance of mine from nearly a decade ago has a nice although perhaps decreasingly well known site. From one page of that:

    Tilts and shifts are used to change perspective and change the plane of best focus to help obtain a greater depth of field. Can mosaics of digital camera images do the same thing, and can they achieve the same resolution needed to make large sharp prints? This articles discusses some of these issues.
    he essentially shifts focus in rows as he covers the rows further back

    it can work nicely (I might add that I don't 100% agree with everything he writes despite his credentials and we have had dialog over this over the years)

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Posts
    1,309
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by pellicle View Post
    Jonas's post doesn't explicitly plug PTGui, but it is the best.

    my suggestion is manual exposure (to prevent any exposure drifts) and pick either a specific white balance or do your own custom or shoot in RAW and convert to whatever you want.
    (img)
    4 images taken with FD50mm @ 5.6
    pellicle, I think I miss some nice flowing water in that pano?! It's an exciting image making me curious about what more to see at the same place.

    Quote Originally Posted by jwestra View Post
    Thank you, I just downloaded the trail version. I should also avoid refocussing right?
    See below

    Quote Originally Posted by sangio View Post
    I would add using manual focus at one preset distance to Pellicle's suggestions.
    (img)
    The horizontal FOV is approx 220 degrees.
    220 degrees is pretty wide Santo, no?!

    Quote Originally Posted by photoSmart42 View Post
    Hi, Jonas. I should add that I set my white balance manually also, so I think that helped keep the exposure levels true across the entire scene. The only 'automatic' feature I had enabled was the focus. Area focus seemed to work OK, but I'll have to look at the details in the photos to see how they came out at that level.

    I haven't tried other projection methods for stitching yet. The tutorial I was reading suggested starting out with the default projection in PS4, so that's what I used. I'll play with other projection methods as well. I did look at trying PTGui, and I'll download the trial to see how the end result would be different for the shots I took.

    BTW, your pano of that building is awesome! Looks like it was shot using a LF view camera. Very nice!
    I always set everything to manual. As I shoot raw the white balance doesn't matter really. More on that later.

    Manual exposure helps to get the seems invisible. Manual and locked focusing helps to avoid any unwanted affects from the lens changing focal length during the series of images, and possibly from other odd artifacts as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by photoSmart42 View Post
    Here's another pano from San Diego harbor.
    (img)
    I like that one better than the first. It's something with the projection in the first making it look too much distorted to my eyes.

    Quote Originally Posted by pellicle View Post
    Hi

    well, it depends ... as Jonas suggested above he got some sort of "tilt" focus effect by having the focal plane essentially altered as his images "panned" down and also used differing exposures (probably not by much).

    I suggest that the only 'rules' are ones you see don't look right ... experiment experiment experiment

    of course with wider angles focus is a lesser influence.

    An old acquaintance of mine from nearly a decade ago has a nice although perhaps decreasingly well known site. From one page of that:

    he essentially shifts focus in rows as he covers the rows further back

    it can work nicely (I might add that I don't 100% agree with everything he writes despite his credentials and we have had dialog over this over the years)
    I didn't suggest anything like that pellicle... I "always" have the focusing fixed and untouched during the shooting. I also didn't change the exposure, it's in the image of the flowing but frozen water I used a shorter exposure time for the top part. That was only to handle the dynamic range inthe image.

    I think I use two methods for taking panos/mosaics, then mixed with a third one.

    Manual exposure, manual focusing, manual WB and a choice of aperture making the whole subject within the DOF all helps.There are exceptions though.

    1) Tripod and pano head. This is very good for tricky panos with a lot of background details. Everything manual as above.

    2) Handheld. With some exercise one can get good results also in semi tricky conditions. One trick is to check a nearby detail against a far away detail at the right side of the viewfinder (provided you are taking images from the left to the right) and check they align approx the same when having turned the camera.

    x) Automatic settings. When the DR is very wide I have experimented with having the exposure set to Auto (aperture priority!). PTGui handles this pretty well but the image does of course need some extra help during post.

    x) focus shift. The top image in my first post is an example; I changed the focus slightly between the two exposures to get an impression of wider DOF. The OM50/2 handles this OK. Some experimenting with the favourite lenses are at place.

    On white balance:
    Most panos cover a wide area and the dynamic range we want to capture often exceeds what the camera can handle. We are somewhat helped by the size of the resulting image where we can lift the shadows more than usual and still not get a lot of noise. Exposing to the right is very good. So, I set the camera to one of my custom white balance slots, the one I have set to UniWB. Then I take some test exposures checking the resulting histogram and placing it as far to the right as possible.

    Here is a pano, or mosaic, taken with this method, a sloppyweb version quickly developed right now:

    Above: using UniWB for the exposure saved the dark garage doors by allowing for exact exposure with the white wall on the limit to get burned out. Here a tripod was necessary for the exposure time, and a pano head for the alignment.


    Above: Mainly for fun, a 100% crop giving us an idea about what size the panos can be printed to.

    But as mentioned by pellicle above; there are no rules. Experiment and have fun! To me panos and stitching is the second best feature with digital photography, something that couldn't be done in the darkroom and at the same time increases the image quality.

    regards,

    /Jonas

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas View Post
    I like that one better than the first. It's something with the projection in the first making it look too much distorted to my eyes.
    Thanks, and I agree. I think there's something about the elements in the two photos that create different optical illusions. In the first one, the boats are closer to the camera than the pier that trails out of the top of the photo, so when stitched it amplifies the illusion of curvature away from the viewer. In the second one, even though the photo covers a wider FOV than the first one, I think the fact that all the elements are contained and framed within the center area make it seem less distorted, and more pleasing. Something to consider when composing future pano shots.

    Oddly enough, the second photo I posted was the first pano I took =).
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  14. #14
    Senior Member m3photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,043
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    28

    Re: Building Stitch

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas View Post
    Here is the initial result before further processing:
    Jonas: Just curious - Do you de-vignette each individual image in ACR beforehand for the master shot or is what you've shown here the one you do your "further processing" on? If so, it's a lot of work, isn't it?

    By the way I loved this image when I saw it the first time.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Posts
    1,309
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by m3photo View Post
    Jonas: Just curious - Do you de-vignette each individual image in ACR beforehand for the master shot or is what you've shown here the one you do your "further processing" on? If so, it's a lot of work, isn't it?
    I went back to the archive and checked. In this case I had a lens with very pronounced vignetting (read: doesn't cover the sensor). I loaded the full images into PTGui. There I cropped one of them a bit to get rid of the corners and told PTGui to crop them all the same way.

    In the next step the software tries to align the images and the window you see is the "Panorama editor" window where one can try different projections, straighten the horizon and such.

    From there the software takes over for the final stitching process and the make of a PSD file (or TIF, or JPG or...). Among the available options I have set as default the software is told to "blend" the images with each other for a seamless stitch.

    This works very well and for the most of the time there is no need to do anything else. Maybe a touch-up at a couple of places. As I try to expose to the right I also adjust some things in Photoshop, like levels/curves, gamma and such. That is usually not more work than it is with any other image.

    We have been discussing PTGui here but I don't doubt any advanced panorama software (Autopano Pro, for example) does the same thing.

    By the way I loved this image when I saw it the first time.
    Hey, thank you Michael.

    /Jonas

  16. #16
    Senior Member pellicle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Southport, Australia
    Posts
    1,429
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Hi Jonas

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas View Post
    pellicle, I think I miss some nice flowing water in that pano?! It's an exciting image making me curious about what more to see at the same place.
    well there is actually a small weir there which holds back the water a bit. I thought it looked artifical to include it, as there are indeed lake shore and river mouths looking more like that here.

    Just down from the weir is a small rapid (like 2 meters)


    click for larger


    which is also nice ... but I didn't have any ND filter for my 4x5 and so the shots are too 'fast' for my taste. Although if I was working more telephoto (as a zoomed in segment from the 4x5 shows) I would perhaps have enough motion blur for my taste


    click for larger


    for interest, the above is about 1600dpi scan from the 4x5 neg. Looks sharp enough under my loupe to tolerate a nice 2400 dpi scan from a better scanner than my Epson 4990, which would be about 10,904 x 8,608 pixels from my image area on the film. Considering I use a 90mm lens, I'll insert 4/3 relevence to this post by saying that a mosaic done with a 50mm lens on a 4/3 camera will be as sharp and is the reason I want a tilt lens for my G1 ... mosaics of things which aren't at infinity and aren't at a flat angle to the camera.

    I do sometimes think its easier to take one sheet with the 4x5 however...

    sorry about inserting misunderstandings into your posts :-)
    Last edited by pellicle; 23rd March 2010 at 23:10.

  17. #17
    Senior Member m3photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,043
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    28

    Re: PP Corrections

    I appreciate the explanation, as I am sure many others will have learnt a little more on this fascinating subject.
    Thank you Jonas.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Posts
    1,309
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: PP Corrections

    Quote Originally Posted by m3photo View Post
    I appreciate the explanation, as I am sure many others will have learnt a little more on this fascinating subject.
    Thank you Jonas.
    No problem.
    What anyone new to panos should do is to read one or two of the numerous tutorials freely available. We'll all forget a lot of things trying to squeeze anything into the forum format.

    regards,

    /Jonas

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    North Carolina western foothills
    Posts
    1,860
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas View Post
    Hi Dragos,

    I think your technique for taking the pano is about the same I use. "area focus for every shot" can work unless you experiment with shorter distances. I try to avoid it. Did you try different projection methods when stitching?

    I like stitching. It is like making a bigger sensor in the post processing, and as a life saver when you haven't brought the right lens for the job. I sometimes use it for land- or cityscapes for the traditional wider shot but here are two other ones:


    Above: G1, Zuiko OM50/2 Macro, handheld, 2 images just to cover the scene. It was about -7 degrees Celsius and there was spraying water so I didn't care for switching lens. I also had a shorter shutter time for the top part to handle the DR.


    The image above is over 30 exposures with hefty overlap. I was out walking with one lens only. The light happened to be right for the building and I fired away. The grid overlay is great (I just wish one could turn it grey instead of the intense white). Here is the initial result before further processing:


    Good luck with the panos, I think it is fun and rewarding.

    /Jonas
    You've shown that one before and I marveled at the number of shots as I do again. (I've never tried more than 9 total-- 3 over 3 on tripod with shifting on TS lens--I've done handheld, but usually 4--2 over 2). Thanks for the workflow you give in another post.

    Diane

  20. #20
    Member sangio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    24

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    220 degrees is pretty wide Santo, no?!


    /Jonas[/QUOTE]

    Thanks Jonas,

    I keep looking at that multi shot building pano, it's a great capture.

    I've done a few 360 degree pans, but they're not easy to print. Here's a 360 pano that I wrapped around itself using polar coordinates in PS.

    cheers
    Santo

  21. #21
    Senior Member pellicle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Southport, Australia
    Posts
    1,429
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Santo

    thats really cute! I'll have to try that

  22. #22
    Member sangio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    24

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by pellicle View Post
    Santo

    thats really cute! I'll have to try that
    Thanks,

    I have a large print of that pano hanging in my den....

    This process has been around for a while, I saw it on some website a couple of years ago, but can't find the link so here's a condensed how-to

    1. after creating the 360 degree pan, crop any overlap out of the image so that it's exactly 360 degrees.
    2. flip the image vertically, so it's upside down
    3. apply the "polar coordinates" filter in PS.
    4. use the "distort" function in Edit to stretch the image out so that the center is roughly circular.

    There's a lot of distortion on the edges, so a clear blue sky without clouds works best.

    regards
    Santo

  23. #23
    Senior Member Devon Shaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by jwestra View Post
    Really good nice! Might save me some money on a wide angle lens. Is Photoshop the best software to do this? Or is special software like panoramo editor in the example above more suitable?
    If you'd like a free option to start out with I've had good results with Hugin.
    http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    Once I get past 10 or so images it's choked up a bit and refused to finish stitching them.. but that could be more related to the speed of my computer than anything


    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3617/...65569be6_o.jpg

    -Devon

  24. #24
    Senior Member ggibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    743
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Nice work, Devon! I like how the shot is framed on either side with the fence and the tree in the middle grabs your attention.

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    76
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Forgive the rather bland pictures but I just got my Fotodiox shift adapter for the Minolta MD mount. I put a 28mm 2.8 Rokkor on it for a quick test.

    Primarily got this setup for panos. The adapter has a tripod mount so that the lens will maintain position while the camera shifts, avoiding parallax. Very easy to use and quick to setup for panos.

    The adapter rotates so that vertical shift is possible but using the adapter mount, the camera interferes and does not allow the rotation. I will have to figure something out with some sort of spacer.

    I use CS4 and it gives stellar results. I first use LR 2.6 to adjust exposure, white balance, etc using auto synch so that the images are all the same. Manual exposure of course.

    I have a 45mm 2.0 coming and plan to get the 50mm macro. I got this setup because I wanted to try using panos on macro flower shots, something I've not seen much of and think may give interesting results.

    For landscapes I tend to use longer focal lengths so this will fill the bill. Not too good for architectural shots because there are no viable wide angel lens available.

    The aspect ratio is close to 3:1 which is near what I usually use for landscapes.

    Larry

  26. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Posts
    1,309
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Diane B View Post
    You've shown that one before and I marveled at the number of shots as I do again. (I've never tried more than 9 total-- 3 over 3 on tripod with shifting on TS lens--I've done handheld, but usually 4--2 over 2). Thanks for the workflow you give in another post.

    Diane
    Hi,
    I had to go back and check again. Yes, I posted it April 13 last year. I couldn't believe people remembered any of my images that long. I was wrong btw, it was 40+ images in that mosaic. Seeing it now again I wonder I overcorrected it. I used a bigger overlap than usual as the lens doesn't cover the full sensor. And Thank you.


    Thanks Jonas,

    I keep looking at that multi shot building pano, it's a great capture.

    I've done a few 360 degree pans, but they're not easy to print. Here's a 360 pano that I wrapped around itself using polar coordinates in PS.

    cheers
    Santo
    Santo,

    That's a fun image. Maybe more pop art than photography but good to look at anyway. I guess one have to think about the vantage point for a successful circular image in that style.

    Quote Originally Posted by leuallen View Post
    Forgive the rather bland pictures but I just got my Fotodiox shift adapter for the Minolta MD mount. I put a 28mm 2.8 Rokkor on it for a quick test.

    Primarily got this setup for panos. The adapter has a tripod mount so that the lens will maintain position while the camera shifts, avoiding parallax. Very easy to use and quick to setup for panos.

    The adapter rotates so that vertical shift is possible but using the adapter mount, the camera interferes and does not allow the rotation. I will have to figure something out with some sort of spacer. (...)
    Larry,
    I'm not sure I understand your setup. Are you saying you just moved the camera in parallel to the target and then made your panos from (probably) three images each? I have seen that technique earlier and it seems very good but perhaps a little limiting as well.

    regards,

    /Jonas

  27. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    76
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    I'm not sure I understand your setup. Are you saying you just moved the camera in parallel to the target and then made your panos from (probably) three images each? I have seen that technique earlier and it seems very good but perhaps a little limiting as well.
    That's the idea. Works well. Will be useful for lots of things. I have other pano setups if needed.

    Larry

  28. #28
    Member sangio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    24

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by leuallen View Post
    Forgive the rather bland pictures but I just got my Fotodiox shift adapter for the Minolta MD mount. I put a 28mm 2.8 Rokkor on it for a quick test.

    <snip>

    The aspect ratio is close to 3:1 which is near what I usually use for landscapes.

    Larry
    Hi Larry:

    It looks like you're getting about double the horizontal FOV with this adapter, is that correct? I can see how this would be very interesting to use for macro panoramas as you mentioned.

    How does the camera interfere for vertical shots? Is it because the clamp extends under the camera body?

    I definitely need one of these, I wish fotodiox would make one for OM lenses.

    cheers
    Santo

  29. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    76
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    How does the camera interfere for vertical shots? Is it because the clamp extends under the camera body?
    The body hits the tripod head. I use the Manfrotto quick release adapters (square) and the body prevents the quick plate from going into the head. I can probably cook up a fix.

    I am pleased with the field of view. It gives me what I usually shoot when using normal pano techniques. My normal pano is usually 8+ images with camera vertical and a longish focal length. This method requires only 3 images, camera horizontal with shorter focal length. The trade off is that the normal pano is higher resolution but the resolution with the shift method is sufficient for the sizes I usually print.

    The shift method has the advantage that the gear is much lighter and simpler too use. I can use an ordinary ball head and lighter tripod instead of my geared Manfrotto 410 and L bracket and heavy tripod. So I am much more likely to have it with me.

    Attached is pano I took last fall. G1 and about a 200mm focal but I don't remember which lens as I have several and there is no EXIF data and I am not good at noting.

    Larry

  30. #30
    admactanium
    Guest

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    One from my recent trip to Turkey.


  31. #31
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    3,541
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    I made a sliding back for my 4x5 so I could attach the Lumix G1 body and then use my large format lenses. Sort of a big tilt/shift arrangement. Think I may have posted this last year, but here is a garden pano made with this contraption and the Rodenstock APO-Sironar-S 135mm/5.6 lens.

    Carl
    Gallery

  32. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by scho View Post
    I made a sliding back for my 4x5 so I could attach the Lumix G1 body and then use my large format lenses. Sort of a big tilt/shift arrangement. Think I may have posted this last year, but here is a garden pano made with this contraption and the Rodenstock APO-Sironar-S 135mm/5.6 lens.
    That's awesome! I was thinking of doing the same thing once I get a 4x5. Can you only slide the G1 horizontally with the setup, or can you flip the back so you can do the same thing vertically?
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  33. #33
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    3,541
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by photoSmart42 View Post
    That's awesome! I was thinking of doing the same thing once I get a 4x5. Can you only slide the G1 horizontally with the setup, or can you flip the back so you can do the same thing vertically?
    The back can be flipped and you can also use rise/fall for multi row stitching if desired. I later bought a commercial version (chinese ebay) made for the eos mount and tried it with the G1 via an eos to m43 adapter, but the adapter adds too much extension to be useful. I do use it now occasionally with my 5DII.

    Carl
    Gallery

  34. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by scho View Post
    The back can be flipped and you can also use rise/fall for multi row stitching if desired. I later bought a commercial version (chinese ebay) made for the eos mount and tried it with the G1 via an eos to m43 adapter, but the adapter adds too much extension to be useful. I do use it now occasionally with my 5DII.
    Thank you for the photo of your setup! Wouldn't using rise/fall on the back plate affect your focus plane because of the Scheimpflug effect? For the setup I'm designing I'd be doing rise/fall for the camera adapter only, but keeping the camera geometry fixed.
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  35. #35
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    3,541
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by photoSmart42 View Post
    Thank you for the photo of your setup! Wouldn't using rise/fall on the back plate affect your focus plane because of the Scheimpflug effect? For the setup I'm designing I'd be doing rise/fall for the camera adapter only, but keeping the camera geometry fixed.
    I used rise/fall on the front standard for multi-row stitching with the camera in landscape orientation. Sample using 4 images:

    Carl
    Gallery

  36. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by scho View Post
    I used rise/fall on the front standard for multi-row stitching with the camera in landscape orientation.
    Interesting. Guess I need to refine my understanding of the Scheimpflug as it relates to back plane motion. Thanks!!
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

  37. #37
    Member Arjuna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    203
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    I thought that Scheimpflug applied to tilt/swing, not to shift/rise/fall?

  38. #38
    DougDolde
    Guest

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    That is such a cool building with the multicolored balconies. Love it.

  39. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    776
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Adventures in pano stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Arjuna View Post
    I thought that Scheimpflug applied to tilt/swing, not to shift/rise/fall?
    I honestly don't know for sure now. I thought it applied to any movement of the lens with respect to the film plane, but in hindsight I suppose shift/rise/fall would only affect the location of the focus plane along the film plane, but not the orientation of it.
    -Dragos
    Panasonic GH1/G1, Canon FTb(n)/F-1, Mamiya C330F/RB67 Pro SD, Chamonix 45N-2, Nikon F5 + Assorted Lenses

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •