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Thread: Exposure Compensation on E cameras

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    Exposure Compensation on E cameras

    Does the exposure compensation function on the E-620 do the same thing as neutral density filters?

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    Super Duper
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    Re: Exposure Compensation on E cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by daysleeper View Post
    Does the exposure compensation function on the E-620 do the same thing as neutral density filters?
    These are two entirely different things:

    - Exposure Compensation, on any camera, shifts (or "biases") the meter reading. It's a photographer's manual override to help automated exposure do the right thing.

    - Neutral Density filters reduce the amount of light passing through the lens. They are used typically to allow longer exposure times or larger apertures to be used in bright light.

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    Re: Exposure Compensation on E cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post

    Exposure Compensation, on any camera, shifts (or "biases") the meter reading. It's a photographer's manual override to help automated exposure do the right thing.
    The way I have understood neutral density is that if I want a certain aperture at certain shutter and film speeds, and that if that would overexpose the film, then I could put some "sunglasses" on the lens to correct.

    When I read how exposure compensation works, it seems like it does the same thing. If too much light will hit the sensor, then the electronics corrects for this.

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    radatax
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    Re: Exposure Compensation on E cameras

    Exposure compensation is done if you want more or less exposure in Program, Aperture or Shutter-priority mode.

    Neutral density filters are dark filters which reduce the amount of light coming in through the lens. This is useful if you want to use a wider aperture (for low depth of field) or slower shutter speed (to get blurry motion) on a really bright day and still get the right exposure. Without the ND filter, you'd get an overexposed image when you use wide apertures or slow shutter speeds because there's too much light coming through. Exposure compensation can't correct for this because it would be beyond the maximum aperture or shutter speed for the camera.

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