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Thread: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

  1. #51
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    Re: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

    The box ISO. But as I said, just shoot it at the box ISO first and see how it comes back. The reason I said shooting 1/3rd to 1/2 sop lower is because negative film tolerates overexposure better than underexposure, so when in doubt, overexpose. But still, it is best to shoot the film at the box rating if you are sending it to a lab, because they are developing based on that speed (and they go through a lot of trouble to figure all that out in testing!...or at least they should!).
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    Re: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

    Well, only one way to find out Shoot, develop, print, compensate!
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  3. #53
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    Re: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    with respect to metering, the in-camera meters are problematic as they evaluate various parts of the total scene with more or less influence. I liked my Blad TCC 205 because it was a spot meter, not usually found, but the blad prisms are center weighted. Averaging, center weighted, matrix, all are practically useless with a zone system approach, where the basic concept is to evaluate the amount of reflected light from specific parts of the image.
    If you are serious about zone work, you need a spot meter to examine specific areas.
    overall exposure is usually done by measuring off a middle gray part of the scene, for that you need to use experience to select the right area, OR, Picker's insight was to meter off of your hand (assuming you are caucasion, and your hand is in the same light as the subject, which should be in Zone VI, hence his workshop title, and then overrexpose one stop, so you are exposing as if you had measured zone V.

    another approach is to use an incident meter at the same position as the subject which will set exposure for zone V as well.
    ghoonk - why not meter of a gray card and see where your camera is biased towards?

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    Re: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

    DOH.

    I didn't think of that.

    *facepalm*
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    Re: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

    That is basically what you would be doing if you followed what wentbackward suggested below:

    "With regards to the original question, I think Ansel Adams called these differences, the K factor or something like that, where the meter was biased. If you have a grey card and direct sunlight. Just cover the metered area with the grey card (doesn't matter if it's close to the camera, but just ensure direct light is hitting the card) and set f16. The meter should measure the same as the ISO setting, if it is biased in favour of shadows, it will register a higher shutter speed to under expose slightly."

  6. #56
    Senior Member mathomas's Avatar
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    Re: Advice needed on Hasselblad and Mamiya exposure meters

    ghoonk:

    Here is my simplified method, based on reading here and there, and quite a few rolls of film. For B&W negative film, on sunny days with strong shadows, and for photographs that I really care about and fuss over (not snapshots), and that I am going to process myself, and scan:

    - Rate film at 1 stop slower (so Tri-X is shot at 200, for example)
    - Do incident "metering", or sunny-16. Reflective is too variable, unless done off a gray card.
    - Develop for 20% less time than normally recommended
    (if you send out for processing, then tell them to pull 1 stop, and pray)

    The above assures details in the shadows (via overexposure), and reduces the chance of blowing out highlights (via underdevelopment). Due to the latitude of B&W negative film, any other variance from "perfect" exposure aren't usually harmful.

    If I'm shooting snapshots, then I just use built-in reflective metering and take the good with the bad. Sometimes you just have to relax and take pictures.

    (Also, personally, I'm not sure I believe any camera manufacturer calibrates their meter's sensitivity for any particular film type. It's more likely that there are just sample variations. That being said, someone's suggestion of using a gray card to test it is great, if you insist on reflective).


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    Last edited by mathomas; 9th September 2011 at 21:53.

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