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Thread: Question about film fogging

  1. #1
    New Member camperbc's Avatar
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    Question about film fogging

    Well, yesterday was the big day! I developed my first two rolls of film; the first in 35 years! I had so much fun, and I must say the results pleasantly surprised me, particularly when you consider that my two old Soviet rangefinders (Zorki-4 and FED 2) are over a half century old! I had used the "Sunny 16" rule, and it worked just like a charm for every last frame, I kid you not! I've got a couple sample images posted on my Flickr Photostream already, and a few more on my website, under the "Film" heading if you care to see what I did; I'd love to hear your opinion regarding my first film captures in many years, and my first developing since I was in high school!

    I used Ilford Delta 100 Professional film, developed in Ilfosol 3, then scanned to my computer using my new Epson V600 scanner. I was a bit worried about loading the reels, and I struggled just a little at first, but it wasn't nearly so bad as I had been expecting. The actual developing went splendidly, and it was in fact a very enjoyable afternoon for me, particularly for a fellow who spends most of his time flat on his back in bed. (permanent spinal issues) I can hardly wait to do some more!

    I was completely blown off my feet when I saw my first results. With zero experience at this, and having shot the two test films using decades-old cameras of questionable quality, I was thrilled to see what I ended up with. Now, you may look at them and think they're adequate, and I'm sure I will continue to grow and improve with more experience, but I really like what I see. I didn't even go out that day with the idea of getting some seriously "artsy" captures; rather I just wanted to take a few quick test shots to see if the cameras were even capable of taking pictures!

    Now, to the reason I am posting this thread... I've got some questions for anyone who can offer some answers. I'm STILL waiting for a changing bag to arrive in the mail, so in the meantime we taped up a spare room as best we could until I can start using the bag for loading my reels. Anyhow, just a few minutes ago, I decided to load up one of my 120 rolls, so that if my spine allows, I can develop it later on. Well, I struggled a little with this wider film, and ended up handling it much more than I would have liked; ie there is bound to be some fingerprints all over this one. But I eventually got it correctly wound onto the reel, but not before I realized that some tape around a window has loosened off, and it was letting in a line of light! Not much, (barely noticeable) mind you, but light nonetheless. The film is Ilford Delta 100 Professional. So my question is, will this roll be definitely ruined? Is there any chance at all that a tiny bit of light is not enough to fog this film? (I kept my back to the light source) I was devastated... and angry with myself, that I didn't notice it until I was in the middle of spooling. I was sorely tempted to just throw it out and try the next one once I got the window resealed. But then I got to wondering just how sensitive this ISO 100 film is, and whether the rather brief exposure would actually noticeably damage it. I'm sure, for those with experience, you can offer some thoughts on this? And about those %$#@'ing fingerprints, any chance that the actual developing/washing process may eliminate, or at least reduce them, to an "acceptable" level?

    If you think the film is damaged, I won't even bother wasting any chemistry on it, but I will wait to read some replies here first. I'm thinking the fingerprints may not amount to much, but sheesh, if only that changing bag had arrived on schedule, I would not be losing sleep about my possibly fogged film!

    Here is the link to my Flickr Photostream with a couple of pics from yesterday's developing/scanning adventure:

    Flickr: Focus On Newfoundland's Photostream

    And I have six test images from those first two rolls on my website here:

    Focus On Newfoundland: Film

    Looking forward to hearing any thoughts/suggestions you may have!

    Thanks,
    Glen

  2. #2
    richard.L
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    Re: Question about film fogging

    ALWAYS, examine your accidents!

    run the film.

    look at it -- probably increased base fog. maybe even "moons" from folding the film. not likely as many finger prints as you expect, unless your hands are "stickier" than most peoples.

    Let the Gods Of Photon speak -- most people are deaf to them and pass through life duplicating pictures, instead of making pictures.

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    Re: Question about film fogging

    Good images there Glen and nice PP treatment.

    I'll second Richard's comment in that you should process the "fogged". It'll answer a lot of your questions.

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    Re: Question about film fogging

    Quote Originally Posted by camperbc View Post
    So my question is, will this roll be definitely ruined?
    Not necessarily.

    Quote Originally Posted by camperbc View Post
    Is there any chance at all that a tiny bit of light is not enough to fog this film?
    Yes.

    Normally I'd say go ahead and develop the film. But it sounds as though the amount of time that you feel well enough to develop film - and no doubt to be out in the field taking pictures, too - is very limited. So you need to decide whether the particular pictures on that roll are important enough to spend such a precious and limited resource on.

    Your first round with the 35mm is great - I'm not the least bit worried about your ability to make good pictures on film!

    I'm sure you'll get the hang of 120, too. If necessary, you can practice loading a reel in the light with an expired roll of film before you try again in the dark. But given that you perhaps need to husband your good time carefully, I wouldn't feel compelled to develop anything you wouldn't otherwise want to, just to teach yourself a lesson. If you really do want to develop that film, then of course please do - just don't feel compelled, is all.

    Good start, good luck, and here's hoping you will have much more of the good time and much less of the not-so-good time!

  5. #5
    richard.L
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    Re: Question about film fogging

    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    So you need to decide whether the particular pictures on that roll are important enough to spend such a precious and limited resource on.

    Y I wouldn't feel compelled to develop anything you wouldn't otherwise want to, just to teach yourself a lesson.
    soup the film, not out of punishment, but out of experiencing -- the film, fully.


    Step One: the subject
    Step Two: the experience

    get past the nouns of art.

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    Re: Question about film fogging

    I think you will be OK. The leak at the window will appear far brighter than the light actually reaching you--if you could not see the film as you were winding, then the light falling on it was most likely insignificant.

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    New Member camperbc's Avatar
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    Re: Question about film fogging

    Thanks so much, everyone, for your kind comments and advice, as well as your well-wishes; very much appreciated! I'm bedridden again at the moment, so have not had an opportunity to develop the 120 yet. I'll let you know what I come up with!

    Many thanks again,

    Glen

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    New Member camperbc's Avatar
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    Re: Question about film fogging

    Hi everyone,

    Well, as I've been bedridden almost entirely for the past two weeks, (thanks to my ongoing spinal issues) I finally yesterday got around to developing the roll of 120 that you may recall I had struggled with getting spooled onto the reel. You may also remember that I had experienced a "darkroom malfunction", in that the duct tape I had used to seal my window, decided at that precise moment to let go, and in the midst of my struggling to get the film onto the reel, I suddenly discovered that light was streaming into the room. And let's not forget about the tons of inevitable fingerprints and creasing after several minutes of panicky fumbling!

    Well, the results are in, and I'm pleasantly surprised! I see absolutely no sign of any fogging, no fingerprints, and no creases/scratches are visible at all! And here I thought that I'd ruined this film!

    Anyhow, here are a couple of my test photos from this first roll through my beloved 1958 Yashica 635 TLR. Nothing too earth-shatteringly artsy here; was simply testing to determine if my lovely old camera was functioning correctly, and to see if I could get the hang of film developing again, after my 35 year hiatus.

    These two photos were taken just steps from our oceanfront home on Fogo Island, located off the northeast coast of Newfoundland. The light was poor for the first one, and by time I took the second one, the sun had long since set, so I'm quite surprised how well they turned out. I used Ilford Delta 100 Professional, developed with Ilfosol 3, and scanned to my computer using my new Epson V600 flatbed scanner.

    I'm extremely pleased with my Yashica 635. Its images are sharp and contrasty, and it's a real pleasure to shoot with.

    Thanks for your well-wishes, encouragement and support; very much appreciated!

    Glen






  9. #9
    richard.L
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    Re: Question about film fogging

    fogo, heh? looks like a nice place.

    bet that these would look even nicer as organic (silver) rather than synthetic (digital) images.

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    Re: Question about film fogging

    Quote Originally Posted by camperbc View Post
    Well, the results are in, and I'm pleasantly surprised! I see absolutely no sign of any fogging, no fingerprints, and no creases/scratches are visible at all!


    Quote Originally Posted by camperbc View Post
    Anyhow, here are a couple of my test photos from this first roll through my beloved 1958 Yashica 635 TLR. Nothing too earth-shatteringly artsy here; was simply testing to determine if my lovely old camera was functioning correctly, and to see if I could get the hang of film developing again, after my 35 year hiatus.
    No need to be self-consciously artsy - you'll make fine pictures just straightforwardly documenting what you see around you.

    Feel better - I'll look forward to seeing more!

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