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Thread: New to 120 Scanning

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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    New to 120 Scanning

    I haven't shot Medium Format since the 1970's. I've just purchased a Fuji GX 689III.

    I'm looking for a custom lab for scanning in Los Angeles.

    Recommendations for a decent scanner which won't break the bank.

    Thanks,
    Gary

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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    A good scanner would be the Epson V700, excellent for MF and LF, not so good for 35mm though. I use the Betterscanning film holders with ANR glass but the standard holders still do a good job if you take the time to test the focus calibration. With a good workflow you can get a very high quality scan.

    Steve

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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    Thanks for the tip. I'll check it out.

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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    +1 for the V700/750/800/850. A good film holder that keeps the film flat is the key to success.

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    Senior Member 4season's Avatar
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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    I'm new to scanning film too, but I recently scored a new-in-box V700 for $350 from a local Craigslist seller. I updated to the latest Epson Scan software, and also purchased VueScan software which allows greater control.

    I'm pleased with what I'm seeing, though color correction, particularly of color negatives, is still proving kind of tricky in VueScan.

    The stock plastic film carriers are working okay for me but I'll probably upgrade these at some point. Impression is that my film (up to 6x6 images anyhow; I haven't gotten to my 6x9 and 4"x5" negatives yet) are being held reasonably flat, but the carriers are kind of annoying to work with, and once I get past the practice phase, I'll want something that can be loaded and unloaded faster, and which allows me to scan clear to the edge of the emulsion.

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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    To get the best image from the stock holders you need to do a focus test using the adjustable feet and see which setting gives the sharpest image. The Betterscanning holders have finely adjustable feet and can be an improvement.

    For the colour correction in Vuescan as always try to aim for a flat low contrast scan without any clipping (it should look horrible) and choose a film type from the menu that most closely matches what you are scanning, with any luck the exact type will be on the list. You should then get another drop down menu with further options and you just choose the one that is nearest to perfect in terms of colour balance. Scan and then adjust contrast to how you want it in Photoshop and then tweak the colour balance.

    Ultimately it isn't worth trying for a finished product direct from the scanner.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/
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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    To get the best image from the stock holders you need to do a focus test using the adjustable feet and see which setting gives the sharpest image. The Betterscanning holders have finely adjustable feet and can be an improvement.

    For the colour correction in Vuescan as always try to aim for a flat low contrast scan without any clipping (it should look horrible) and choose a film type from the menu that most closely matches what you are scanning, with any luck the exact type will be on the list. You should then get another drop down menu with further options and you just choose the one that is nearest to perfect in terms of colour balance. Scan and then adjust contrast to how you want it in Photoshop and then tweak the colour balance.

    Ultimately it isn't worth trying for a finished product direct from the scanner.

    Steve
    Really good tips. Thank you very much. Keep 'em coming ... lol.

    Gary

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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    You can get some anti reflective glass cut that will sit in the Epson 120 film holders. Remove the hinged piece of plastic, lay the film strip in the holder, then the ANR glass on top of the film. If the film is really curly, tape the film at the ends to the ANR glass.

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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: New to 120 Scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    You can get some anti reflective glass cut that will sit in the Epson 120 film holders. Remove the hinged piece of plastic, lay the film strip in the holder, then the ANR glass on top of the film. If the film is really curly, tape the film at the ends to the ANR glass.
    Thanks. It seems that a bit of ANR glass is the trick ... or buy a Plustek at twice the cost. I have decided between an Epson or Plustek. No real rush yet as my film backs haven't arrived.

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