Site Sponsors
Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: NSFW: How is this for a pose

  1. #1
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    NSFW: How is this for a pose

    I apologize for posting this before finishing, and when I have time I will complete it, but today's model Sasha had some interesting poses.
    This is one example.
    Attachment 18948
    -bob

  2. #2
    Ranger 9
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Sheesh, half the girls I photograph want to do that pose (we've named it "the spider.") Apparently some big-name ballerina was photographed that way for a magazine or a calendar -- I haven't been able to track down the source image, but seems as if all the dancerettes have seen it. I'm attaching a shot of my friend Katrinka doing it as a gag.

    Given that the basic concept of the pose is kind of well-known, I like what you've done with the heavy, moody lighting -- it makes it seem stronger and more serious. That, plus the fact that your model has more cleavage than the average ballet dancer, keeps it out of the realm of cliché -- it has an almost ominous look.

  3. #3
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Well, it is kind of unique -- at least for right now!

    ,
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  4. #4
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Finished it up. Along came a spider

    -bob
    Last edited by Bob; 4th July 2009 at 06:43.

  5. #5
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    What's up with the clothing Bob? I thought that you preferred au natural like me!

    I like the pose but the lighting isn't working for me on this one.

  6. #6
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by ddk View Post
    What's up with the clothing Bob? I thought that you preferred au natural like me!

    I like the pose but the lighting isn't working for me on this one.
    I post nudes and nobody peeps,
    So I post one with clothing and now you complain? sheesh!
    Well, I thought I would try something different.

    I have been playing lately with side and rim lighting, so that is how I was set up.
    What lighting would you have preferred?

    -bob
    Last edited by Bob; 4th July 2009 at 07:20.

  7. #7
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    I post nudes and nobody peeps,
    doesn't mean that we didn't look.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    So I post one with clothing and now you complain? sheesh!
    Well, I thought I would try something different.
    As the caveman said: different, gooood, clothes no good

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    I have been playing lately with side and rim lighting, so that is how I was set up.
    -bob
    Depending on the angle I was shooting her, I would go loop or have a fill if I was side lighting (edit) I'd lower the main and bring it down closer to her, maybe get some interesting shadows, she's a very unique model who can control her body too, would have been nice to see more of her...

    just my 2 cents.
    Last edited by ddk; 4th July 2009 at 07:36.

  8. #8
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    You just might

  9. #9
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    You just might
    When?

  10. #10
    Ranger 9
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    I have been playing lately with side and rim lighting, so that is how I was set up.

    What lighting would you have preferred?
    I think the lighting you used is a great start -- it gives a terrific sense of sculptural mass and volume. (Mass and volume aren't always what young women want in their photos, but it looks as if this model is comfortable with displaying her own form of beauty.)

    Since you mentioned rim lighting, I'd have wanted to try adding a hard rim light from the back diagonal on the side away from the main light. Just a skim of hard light would help separate the dark side of her figure from the background, and add some glints that would emphasize her musculature.

    Of course that would mean you'd wind up with crazy shadows coming toward the camera, as in the example picture I've attached, but hey, if you're experimenting...

    [The attachment is a poor scan of an old print, but I'm showing it as an example of me struggling with the same concept. Nancy was a sweet girl with a beautifully soft quality to her dancing -- but she also had broad shoulders, a strong back, and a tremendous level of determination, and I wanted to light her in a way that would respect all those qualities. So, the old soft-light-opposite-hard-light trick...]

    The way I see it, the picture you've made is all about contrasting ideas of strength. (Which sounds better than saying it's all about cleavage!) Classical dancing is supposed to look effortless, but making it look effortless requires a tremendous amount of hidden strength. By making that strength visible, you're unifying two contrasting concepts visually, which is almost always a cool idea for making photographs!


    Incidentally, I'm glad you did NOT shoot this picture as a nude... that would have made the picture all about the nudity, and any other ideas would have gotten submerged in that...

  11. #11
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    Incidentally, I'm glad you did NOT shoot this picture as a nude... that would have made the picture all about the nudity, and any other ideas would have gotten submerged in that...
    Care to explain why nudity would submerge ideas?

  12. #12
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by ddk View Post
    Care to explain why nudity would submerge ideas?
    Well, this particular angle given her build, nude might have not looked as good.
    I plan to shoot some implied of her later this summer.

  13. #13
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    I think the lighting you used is a great start -- it gives a terrific sense of sculptural mass and volume. (Mass and volume aren't always what young women want in their photos, but it looks as if this model is comfortable with displaying her own form of beauty.)

    The way I see it, the picture you've made is all about contrasting ideas of strength. (Which sounds better than saying it's all about cleavage!) Classical dancing is supposed to look effortless, but making it look effortless requires a tremendous amount of hidden strength. By making that strength visible, you're unifying two contrasting concepts visually, which is almost always a cool idea for making photographs!


    Incidentally, I'm glad you did NOT shoot this picture as a nude... that would have made the picture all about the nudity, and any other ideas would have gotten submerged in that...
    It is interesting that lately more young women seem to be comfortable with displaying their musculature. Form and Mass may be getting more fashionable at least for the trim.
    Here are two examples the models liked:





    -bob

  14. #14
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    Well, this particular angle given her build, nude might have not looked as good.
    I plan to shoot some implied of her later this summer.
    You're not giving yourself enough credit Bob, I'm sure if you put your head to it you'll come up with some creative ways to shoot her without making it about T&A, if that's what you're worried about.

    Looking forward to seeing more.

  15. #15
    Ranger 9
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by ddk View Post
    Care to explain why nudity would submerge ideas?
    Happy to. One view of information theory says that information consists essentially of surprises; if it only tells you what expected to hear, it isn't really information. (This is why image compression works, for example: you can drop out the pixels whose values can be predicted, and store just the ones whose values can't be predicted.)

    Like every other kind of "data processor," the human perceptual apparatus has a limited bandwidth (supposedly about 40 bits per second, although what defines the brain's "bit" is debatable.)

    We all know from experience, and lots of experiments, that when the mind's bandwidth is exceeded by too much information -- too much unexpected stuff, in other words -- it can't process all of it, and resorts to strategies for discarding some of it. In other words, it "drops packets," just like your computer network does when the lines are noisy.



    Now, when it comes to looking at people, the fact is that the vast majority of the people we see the vast majority of the time are wearing clothes. (And for the vast majority of people, that's a darned good thing!)

    So when you see a representation of someone who is not wearing clothes, it represents an unexpected event -- a piece of information.

    Moreover, this particular piece of information has a lot of collateral implications: artistic, cultural, erotic, and even economic (remember how in old cartoons, somebody who had lost everything was represented as wearing a barrel instead of clothes?)



    Parsing all these potential implications consumes a lot of mind bandwidth, so during this process a lot of other "packets" -- other aesthetic or cultural associations that might also be present -- are more likely to be dropped, or at least deferred.

    That's why nudity works fine in certain photographic contexts for which our minds are already pre-calibrated for it: a Weston fine-art print, a Helmut Newton fashion shot, or a foldout in Playboy magazine, for example. Our response to the nudity aspect of these contexts is already, you might say, pre-compiled, so we can use our mind-bandwidth to enjoy the other aesthetic and intellectual aspects of the presentation.


    When we get outside those well-defined contexts -- as I would argue Bob has done in his photo -- we're entering a realm of ambiguity.

    That's good, because you're much more likely to find interesting stuff in the Realm of Ambiguity than in the Kingdom of the Frickin' Obvious, which (unfortunately) is where most photographs get made.

    Still, there's no denying that ambiguity requires more of the mind's processing horsepower. Dump too much workload on it, and it's going to have to skip over some of the nuances. That's why nudity can submerge other aesthetic elements in an artwork, and why it can be a good choice to leave that element out of the equation. QED.



    If that's not convincing enough for you, try this simple thought experiment: Imagine that President Obama has decided to have his official executive photo done as a full frontal nude. How much public-discussion bandwidth do you think would be consumed before people in general got around to such observations as, "Good Lord, his teeth look really yellow"...?

  16. #16
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    I agree with Ranger 9's points. Thank you, by the way.
    The somewhat obscure or visual surprise, the unexpected if you will, makes a better picture than the frank and obvious.
    OTOH, if you look at a lot of street photography, there is often an element of the literal to the extreme. Most of those are not as interesting to me as the shots that excerpt or abstract the literal in some manner or introduce interesting juxtiposition of elements.
    If our minds are forced to engage to process an image, it naturally draws our attention perhaps out of necessity.
    -bob

  17. #17
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    Happy to. One view of information theory ...

    ...Still, there's no denying that ambiguity requires more of the mind's processing horsepower. Dump too much workload on it, and it's going to have to skip over some of the nuances. That's why nudity can submerge other aesthetic elements in an artwork, and why it can be a good choice to leave that element out of the equation. QED.
    :sleep006: :sleep006: :sleep006:

    Fortunately Eikoh Hosoe, Connie Imboden and many others never heard of your theories otherwise they would have never produced any work.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    If that's not convincing enough for you, try this simple thought experiment: Imagine that President Obama has decided to have his official executive photo done as a full frontal nude. How much public-discussion bandwidth do you think would be consumed before people in general got around to such observations as, "Good Lord, his teeth look really yellow"...?
    You forgot about Jesus, people don't dwell on his nudity, and isn't Obama the new Messiah?

  18. #18
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Did Jesus pose nude Eek
    Never read that in scripture
    -bob

  19. #19
    Ranger 9
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by ddk View Post
    Fortunately Eikoh Hosoe, Connie Imboden and many others never heard of your theories otherwise they would have never produced any work.
    That's why I was careful to say "can be" and "choice." And you'll notice that while the two photographers you mention certainly employ ambiguity in their work, they carefully control how much and what kind. That's what separates art from noise.

    Repeat after me: "Read, then type. Read, then type. Read, then type..."

  20. #20
    ddk
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    That's why I was careful to say "can be" and "choice." And you'll notice that while the two photographers you mention certainly employ ambiguity in their work, they carefully control how much and what kind. That's what separates art from noise.

    Repeat after me: "Read, then type. Read, then type. Read, then type..."
    LOL Ranger 9, its July 4th, too much typing and reading already.

  21. #21
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    4,043
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1253

    Re: How is this for a pose

    if i might make a suggestion or two:

    the human figure is capable of very subtle expression and capturing that is an art and worth striving for. you might try figure models who pose for drawing classes.

    what i tend to do with the figure is work close and treat the form or that portion in your frame as sort of a landscape, not necessarily horizontal

  22. #22
    Ranger 9
    Guest

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by ddk View Post
    LOL Ranger 9, its July 4th, too much typing and reading already.
    Okay, fair enough. I was feeling cranky when I wrote that reply. Shoulda gone out and set off some firecrackers instead!

  23. #23
    Administrator Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prescott, Arizona
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    367

    Re: How is this for a pose

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    if i might make a suggestion or two:

    the human figure is capable of very subtle expression and capturing that is an art and worth striving for. you might try figure models who pose for drawing classes.

    what i tend to do with the figure is work close and treat the form or that portion in your frame as sort of a landscape, not necessarily horizontal
    John,
    You have a good point here. The life-drawing models have a polished ability for whole-body expression second to none.
    I am an opportunistic shooter, when a dancer comes along, well ok, why not!
    -bob

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •