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Thread: Best travel/street tips ever...

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    Senior Member bradhusick's Avatar
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    Best travel/street tips ever...

    This video is the best set of street and travel photo tips I have ever encountered. It's well worth your time to watch.

    It's here in the Fuji forum because he shoots with an X-T1.

    Mystical Marrakech | Street Photography with Zack Arias and the X-T1 - YouTube
    Brad Husick
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    Senior Member Mike Woods's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by bradhusick View Post
    This video is the best set of street and travel photo tips I have ever encountered. It's well worth your time to watch.

    It's here in the Fuji forum because he shoots with an X-T1.

    Mystical Marrakech | Street Photography with Zack Arias and the X-T1 - YouTube
    Very enjoyable - thanks for sharing.

    Mike

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    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Well done ..thanks for sharing . He knows his stuff and this is not an easy place to shoot . Carrying an INSTAX (Fuji s Polaroid ) has been on my list for years …time to add it .

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    Well done ..thanks for sharing . He knows his stuff and this is not an easy place to shoot . Carrying an INSTAX (Fuji s Polaroid ) has been on my list for years …time to add it .
    I took one to Kenya and gave pictures to the kids....amazing response.

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I took one to Kenya and gave pictures to the kids....amazing response.
    That must've been truly fun! Be careful though; in some cultures that's some bad juju.

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Agree...I asked local expert first.

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    All his recommendations, instant prints as gifts, guide, looking in different direction while shooting, have been well known among photojournalists and travel photographers for decades before.

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Excellent - Thanks for sharing that Brad.
    "There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." - Ansel Adams

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    Senior Member JohnW's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Really like that first aim-high fake out tip. Hadn't thought of that one. Thanks!

    John

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Some excellent ( albeit well known ) tips by Zack.

    Most important, as far as I am concerned, is to have a local with you.

    But, I have a serious issue with people who photograph others surreptitiously.

    One advise I can do without. Photographing surreptitiously. I have never done it
    anywhere.

    I do it in the open, in full view of those that are being photographed, or after having asked permission ( sometimes one cannot ask permission of tens of people in a crowd..but in full view ).

    If someone objects, erase the image. Be honest about it. Not go back and use some sw to restore the image. Cheating oneself, and others. Some can live with it, others cannot.

    Marrakesh; same place as where Zack was pointing up/down, trying to fool others when he could easily have either asked permission, or done it openly..

    This is how I did it..
    koffee & kamera
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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by rayyan View Post
    Some excellent ( albeit well known ) tips by Zack.

    Most important, as far as I am concerned, is to have a local with you.

    But, I have a serious issue with people who photograph others surreptitiously.

    One advise I can do without. Photographing surreptitiously. I have never done it
    anywhere.

    I do it in the open, in full view of those that are being photographed, or after having asked permission ( sometimes one cannot ask permission of tens of people in a crowd..but in full view ).

    If someone objects, erase the image. Be honest about it. Not go back and use some sw to restore the image. Cheating oneself, and others. Some can live with it, others cannot.

    Marrakesh; same place as where Zack was pointing up/down, trying to fool others when he could easily have either asked permission, or done it openly..

    This is how I did it..
    YES!

    We all see differently and we all shoot differently. I am not casting judgement on how others shoot Street. I shoot Street according to my code and you should shoot Street according to your code. My code was developed over four decades of shooting Street. This is a perspective on Street shooting technique, in particular my perspective. (Which leaves me to immediately wonder … who really cares about my perspective).

    This is my perspective, my code and how I arrived at my code. You Street photogs out there without a code … get one …. give it some thought. You can steal mine, steal Arias', steal someone else’s, or parts of mine, et cetera … or just develop one that works for you. (If I was a young Turk photog … I’d just steal one. It’s a lot easier than giving it any real thought.) But codes are good to have.

    Remember, I used to be a news photographer, a photojournalist. That job went a long way to define who I am. When you work news, it is one of those 24/7 types of jobs. When I wasn’t working I was always looking at the news, looking at what the competition published, always on-call when something really big breaks. How I shoot today, even though photography is now a hobby, contributes to how I see myself as a person. I believe that everything you do reflects upon who you are. While some actions reflect less significantly than others … all actions are reflective directly upon your person as seen by others and as seen by yourself, all to varying degrees.


    Broadway Street – Los Angeles, California, circa 1970’s
    Nikon F w/ Nikkor 28mm, Tri-X

    Two significant elements that are the bases of my code are:


    Broadway Street – Los Angeles, California, circa 1970’s
    Nikon FTn w/ Nikkor 180mm, Tri-X, circa 1970’s


    Respect

    Growing up in America as a minority (Latino), I am hypersensitive to respect. Much of my life centers around respect, respect for self, respect for others deserving of respect and finally earning respect. Respect is a commodity, which cannot be bought. It is a commodity of great value in all society but in particular the minority communities.


    Challenge

    I am driven by 'The Challenge', regardless of what it may be. If there is a contest, a challenge … I gear-up and focus-in. I am a bad loser. Every new day, photography offers a new challenge to better the image I captured yesterday. Photography also offers endless opportunities for photo opportunities and attempts to capture the exceptional photograph.

    Respect and Challenge are the tenants, which I used to develop my Street Code.


    Los Angeles, California – 2007
    Canon 20D, w/ Canon 70-200 @ 200mm

    The Code (finally ... and for what it's worth):


    Shoot with Respect

    Life is a two-way street. Shoot how you would want to be captured if you were on the other end of the camera. To me shooting from the hip is sneaky. Sneaky is disrespectful. I tried shooting from the hip. When I was finished I wanted to take a shower. Other photogs are fine with shooting from the hip, they call it stealth … and that’s okay, I don’t give a rat’s what others do. Shooting from the hip just isn’t me. Remember that you are on your subject’s street. That is where they work and play. It is their front yard and their backyard … treat it with respect.


    Los Angeles, California – 2014
    Fujifilm X-T1, w/ Fujinon 10-24 @ 10mm


    Shoot in the Open

    I prefer shooting everything with two cameras. One camera setup with for long and the other camera setup for wide, I don’t change my preferred shooting methodology for Street. I shoot with the EVF. I shoot with a camera bag hanging off a shoulder. I shoot in plain sight. That is part of the Challenge of Street for me, to capture the exceptional photograph according to my code.


    Los Angeles, California – 2014
    Fujifilm X-T1 w/ Fujinon 55-200 @ 77.9mm

    I do not believe in stealth as a ‘real’ and effective camouflage for Street photography. I just don’t think it works well, if at all. I’ve seen photogs go to great lengths to hide the camera … to hide what they’re doing. They’ll tape the camera; hide the camera in a bag, et al. No matter what you do, it is still a camera. To me the only difference between a 1D with a 70-200 and an X100s is that the subject can see the 1D from a mile away and the X100s from half a mile. I find that ‘blending’ in works best for me. My stealth is to integrate into the Street, to hide in plain sight. I try to be as much a part of the street scene as a mailbox or street lamp. This is a mental thing. Similar to highly trained elite forces willing themselves to be a rock, or bush or tree. Blending in has served me well shooting news and shooting Street.


    Long Beach, California – 2010
    Canon 5D, w/ Canon 300mm


    Appropriate Dress

    When I shoot Street I dress as I would when shooting news. I wear closed-toed shoes, (no sandals), long pant (jeans or khakis), short or long sleeved shirt (no T’s or tank tops, no messages whatsoever), … I try to look ‘professional’ … as in I am working … as in I am not here for entertainment … as in this Street is not the Zoo.


    Los Angeles, California – 2006
    Canon 5D, w/ Canon 70-200 @ 70mm


    Shoot and Walk

    This is the shooting methodology I suggest for the neophyte. Shoot and walk, shoot and walk, shoot and walk. If someone gives you the evil eye or shouts at you just keep walking. Don’t stalk an interesting subject … if the shot is there grab it … if not don’t linger there will be another shot in another half block. As you develop a Street Sense you’ll get the vibe of the Street of the people around you and you’ll have a better sense of when to linger when to stalk and when to get the hell out. But until then, just shoot and walk. If someone starts a friendly conversation … participate of course. Speaking to a subject prior to releasing the shutter, asking for permission to take their photo, more often than not, will completely alter the image from what you first saw and desired to capture. So usually I don’t converse prior to shutter release. I tend to like some eye contact between subject and camera. I try to release the shutter at the very moment the subject recognizes the camera and before the mood I sought to capture is changed.


    Broadway Street – Los Angeles, California – circa 1970’s
    Nikon F w/ Nikkor 20mm, Tri-X


    Los Angeles, California – 2007
    Canon 20D, w/ Canon 18-55 @ 22mm


    Be Aware

    Always be aware of your surroundings and the people around you. When I’m not snapping away I’m moving … looking here … looking there … looking forward … looking back … looking at everybody. I’ve only been accosted once by non-security personal in all my decades of photography all over the world. That was in Los Angeles, my hometown. It was by this huge guy who I think had a mental problem. After taking his snap, he attempted to grab my camera. So I went back to basic, shoot and walk, and starting walking. He started following … well more like chasing as I weaved in and out of the pedestrians crowding the sidewalk. Finally I said to myself enough is enough and I ducked into a restaurant and the giant didn’t follow. Time for a break and I order a bite. I don’t eat/drink while ‘on-assignment’ shooting Street which is distracting and ties up one’s hands. I think my vigilance has reduced the odds of robbery and maleficence. Thieves, I presume, look for an easy target, a tourist with a coffee in one hand, bumbling around the street without any real direction, unaware of their surroundings, makes a much easier target than an alert professional with street smarts. Awareness may save your neck, your gear and will increase your keeper rate.


    Los Angeles, California – 2014
    Fujifilm X-T1 w/ Rokinon 8mm (fish)


    Identification

    I always have a handful of business cards with me for those who are interested. The cards have my name, cell phone and website. Often I will carry a printout of “The Photographer’s Rights”. I’ve never had the need to pass that information out. The cards are a very good tool for lowering of tensions or in some cases complete disarmament and a cessation of hostilities. People respect, (remember that respect thing), if you’re working much more so than if they suspect you’re on holiday out for a stroll at the zoo.


    Anaheim, California – circa 2070’s
    Nikon F2 w/ Nikkor 20mm, Tri-X


    Know Your Rights

    Take the time to know what you can and cannot legally shoot. This has nothing to do with Respect or Challenge … just common sense. Do some research on the internet to familiarize yourself with your rights. Print out a few copies of “The Photographer’s Rights” and always take a few with you. The Constitution protects and ensures the Street photographer to work the streets. But there are a few catches like private property and an individual’s expectation of privacy. As an example, say a pedestrian has a wardrobe malfunction and disappears into an alley to correct the malfunction. There is an expectation of privacy created by the person diving into the alley and the Supreme Court states that expectation of privacy supersedes the fact that the person is in a public street. “So don’t go chasing that person into the alley, give them their space and respect.”

    Remember that just because you have the legal right to capture an image, does not mean that you should.


    Anaheim, California – circa 1970's
    Nikon F2 w/ Nikkor 20mm, Tri-X


    Street Ethics

    I tend to shoot everything … even kids. Yes, children. Children have no greater right to privacy than an adult. A mother bear type has never accosted me, frothing at the mouth, telling me about her children’s civil rights and of laws that don’t exist.


    Broadway Street – Los Angeles, California – circa 1970’s
    Nikon F w/ Nikkor 20mm, Tri-X

    (Then again I’m not sneaky about how I shoot … which may or may not have any bearing.) Just because you legally can do something, does not make it ethically right. I no longer shoot the homeless. As a former journalist, I recognize that there are at least two sides for every story. I also recognized that my homeless photos were only telling my side of the homeless story. I knew what I had to do to shoot homeless with a fair and equitable presentation. So until I sit with them and spend some time with them and learn and capture their story … my images were exploitive at best. So I no longer shoot the homeless. For me, I don’t see a real challenge in shooting homeless. Unfortunately the homeless are plentiful and they usually are sedentary. What challenge is there in shooting something you see everyday that doesn’t move?


    Dana Point, California – 2010
    Canon 1DsMKII w/ Canon 70-200 @ 200mm

    Think about what you are shooting. Think about how you would feel if you were the subject and the subject had the camera. Think about it when you take the shot and think about it later when the shot is processed. Often, shooting with Gestalt, can make an image whose principal value is shock into a meaningful sublime image. Shock can be great … but often shock is so overpowering that it becomes the only message.

    Shoot by listening to what drives you … listen to your gut and heart.


    Broadway Street – Los Angeles, California, circa 1970’s
    Nikon F w/ Nikkor 20mm, Tri-X

    Good Luck and Good Shooting,

    Gary
    My Snaps are Here
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Gary, great post.

    And yeah, I hate the stealth thing.
    Will

    http://www.hakusancreation.com
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Great attitude, Gary, and great photos. Every street shooter should read your post.

    Martin
    Martin Ranger - Seattle, WA
    www.martinrangerimages.com

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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by Shashin View Post
    Gary, great post.

    And yeah, I hate the stealth thing.
    Thanks Will.


    20D w/ 10-22 @ 10mm
    My Snaps are Here
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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by mranger211 View Post
    Great attitude, Gary, and great photos. Every street shooter should read your post.

    Martin
    Thanks Martin.


    Broadway Street, Los Angeles, California - circa 1970's
    Nikon FTn w/ Nikkor 85mm, Tri-X

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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Wonderful images Gary. Your accompanying street shooting comments should be given serious consideration by all. Well done.

    Kindest regards.

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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by rayyan View Post
    Wonderful images Gary. Your accompanying street shooting comments should be given serious consideration by all. Well done.

    Kindest regards.
    Thank you rayyan,

    Gary


    Broadway Street, Los Angeles, California - circa 1970's
    Hasselblad 500 C/M, w/ 80mm Planar, Tri-X
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Great post, Gary. I couldn't agree more. I wish more photographers would live by these principles.

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    Member GaryAyala's Avatar
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgen Udvang View Post
    Great post, Gary. I couldn't agree more. I wish more photographers would live by these principles.
    Takk Jorgen Udvang.

    Last edited by GaryAyala; 21st September 2014 at 22:16.
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  20. #20
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    Re: Best travel/street tips ever...

    Some more tips...

    Street Photography


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