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Thread: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

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    Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    I test drove the Fuji X-Pro2 for a few days. Coming from an extensive kit of FF DSLR's and Medium Format Hasselblad, I was intrigued by the Rangefinder design and the Hybrid EVF/OVF. Out of the box, I was a fan. The camera is small enough, I like the styling. The grip is adequate, but not great. Turning the camera on, I'm still a fan. The AF is very fast and the EVF is clean and crisp. The one lever switch to OVF from EVF is simple enough. Images, out of camera, I'm still a fan. They look great. The 35mm f2 is a nice lens. Light and sharp. Balances well with the camera. The ability to apply film styles is innovative. The ability to process RAW images in camera is impressive.

    So where am I not a fan? Basically it's simplicity and ease of use. The camera just has too much stuff. It's trying to be all things to all photographers. I think it lost the essence of a Rangefinder. There are way to many buttons and each button does way to many things. The wheels scroll and push. There are 7 function buttons, yet no way (that I could find) to back button focus. The spacing on the buttons are awkward. The menu systems are organized, but ridiculously deep. To me there is just to much. This was the camera that was created by designers listening to every nit feature that customers could dream up. It might be a technological tour de force, but the camera has no Soul. I ended up returning it. I wanted it as the camera I would drop on the passenger seat every time I went out. After two days, I knew that wouldn't be the case. It's a great camera, but it just doesn't work for me.

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    That's odd. I find the X Pro2 just as simple to use as my Mamiya 6 rangefinder. You actually do not have to use all the buttons and menu options.
    Will

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Perhaps you should give the XT2 a try instead. I've owned a couple Hasselblad MFD's, a Phase One, Nikon D800, Sony A7 series, M9 and Q. I'm sure they're other digital cameras, but none as satisfying as shooting with a Fuji XT2. No diving into menus for the essentials. ISO, comp. and shutter dials are right there. They also have speed modes and bracketing switches right on top. An amazing weather resistant lens selection and incredibly built cameras using metal not plastic! Lenses imo, are as nicely built as Leica and are less expensive then almost every other manufacture. I can shoot at 8fps and use gorgeous lenses in inclement weather without thinking twice. I won't bother with MFD because at 16x24 there's no difference in image quality. If I need bigger wall sized photos for galleries or clients. I shoot with MF film cameras. The XT2 also has a battery grip that adds performance. After all that gear, this is the camera I bring everywhere. It's also given me peace of mind because i'm not chasing tech anymore or cringing at depreciation of the obscene marketing of MFD. That's not to say I won't be tempted by an XT3

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shashin View Post
    That's odd. I find the X Pro2 just as simple to use as my Mamiya 6 rangefinder. You actually do not have to use all the buttons and menu options.
    I decided to give it another try. I reread he manual and I can simplify my use of the camera. One thing I haven't figured out is if the camera can be set to back button focus in AFC mode. Doesn't look like it, but when reviewer on You Tune said it was possible.

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Not sure if this is your focus question or not but I'd for sure swap functions of the AFL button on the far right back of the camera with the AEL button closer to mid camera. That way I could use my thumb for focus as I do on my Nikon D3.

    I had rented an X100F for a recent trip and used the AF/AE button on back to focus. That worked great. Between that button and the toggle for moving focus points it was very much like the Nikon.

    Neil

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Quote Originally Posted by mkerouac View Post
    I test drove the Fuji X-Pro2 for a few days. Coming from an extensive kit of FF DSLR's and Medium Format Hasselblad, I was intrigued by the Rangefinder design and the Hybrid EVF/OVF. Out of the box, I was a fan. The camera is small enough, I like the styling. The grip is adequate, but not great. Turning the camera on, I'm still a fan. The AF is very fast and the EVF is clean and crisp. The one lever switch to OVF from EVF is simple enough. Images, out of camera, I'm still a fan. They look great. The 35mm f2 is a nice lens. Light and sharp. Balances well with the camera. The ability to apply film styles is innovative. The ability to process RAW images in camera is impressive.

    So where am I not a fan? Basically it's simplicity and ease of use. The camera just has too much stuff. It's trying to be all things to all photographers. I think it lost the essence of a Rangefinder. There are way to many buttons and each button does way to many things. The wheels scroll and push. There are 7 function buttons, yet no way (that I could find) to back button focus. The spacing on the buttons are awkward. The menu systems are organized, but ridiculously deep. To me there is just to much. This was the camera that was created by designers listening to every nit feature that customers could dream up. It might be a technological tour de force, but the camera has no Soul. I ended up returning it. I wanted it as the camera I would drop on the passenger seat every time I went out. After two days, I knew that wouldn't be the case. It's a great camera, but it just doesn't work for me.
    This seems to be a typical 2 days user reaction. Granted there is a learning curve at first, it was for me buying X-Pro2 after selling M 240 and placing order for M10. But, after a while using it I could not go back to rangefinder with its inaccurate frame lines, removable bottom plate and illogical frame line selector, size would be the only plus. X-Pro2 made me to cancel M10 and now I am in the process ordering Leica SL. X-Pro2 can be setup for as simple operation as you like it.
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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Quote Originally Posted by mkerouac View Post
    I test drove the Fuji X-Pro2 for a few days. Coming from an extensive kit of FF DSLR's and Medium Format Hasselblad, I was intrigued by the Rangefinder design and the Hybrid EVF/OVF. Out of the box, I was a fan. The camera is small enough, I like the styling. The grip is adequate, but not great. Turning the camera on, I'm still a fan. The AF is very fast and the EVF is clean and crisp. The one lever switch to OVF from EVF is simple enough. Images, out of camera, I'm still a fan. They look great. The 35mm f2 is a nice lens. Light and sharp. Balances well with the camera. The ability to apply film styles is innovative. The ability to process RAW images in camera is impressive.

    So where am I not a fan? Basically it's simplicity and ease of use. The camera just has too much stuff. It's trying to be all things to all photographers. I think it lost the essence of a Rangefinder. There are way to many buttons and each button does way to many things. The wheels scroll and push. There are 7 function buttons, yet no way (that I could find) to back button focus. The spacing on the buttons are awkward. The menu systems are organized, but ridiculously deep. To me there is just to much. This was the camera that was created by designers listening to every nit feature that customers could dream up. It might be a technological tour de force, but the camera has no Soul. I ended up returning it. I wanted it as the camera I would drop on the passenger seat every time I went out. After two days, I knew that wouldn't be the case. It's a great camera, but it just doesn't work for me.
    Well. I think that everyone could just use the functions on a camera what they really need. I never ever had this problem with any of my (unfortunately very many) cameras and systems. AND especially with the Fuji's you have the Q menu that gives you just the most important functions at your fingertips.

    So I do not understand these types of complaints. Actually I think a Leica M10 might be just the ideal camera for you, definitely much more different and less deep menus but all for at least 4x the price of the Fuji XPro2. If this is what you like, why not just spend this money and be happy?????

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Quote Originally Posted by neils View Post
    Not sure if this is your focus question or not but I'd for sure swap functions of the AFL button on the far right back of the camera with the AEL button closer to mid camera. That way I could use my thumb for focus as I do on my Nikon D3.

    I had rented an X100F for a recent trip and used the AF/AE button on back to focus. That worked great. Between that button and the toggle for moving focus points it was very much like the Nikon.

    Neil
    That is kind of my focus question. I can get backbutton focus by setting the camera to manual and then using the AFL button on the far right for backbutton focus. But its not a great location. I can't figure out how to swap the AFL button with the AEL button. That would be a big help. Time to dig into the manual again.

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Most of the time I have a manual focus prime mounted on my X-Pro2. That is one way to avoid fuss over AF operation!

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Quote Originally Posted by mkerouac View Post
    I test drove the Fuji X-Pro2 for a few days. Coming from an extensive kit of FF DSLR's and Medium Format Hasselblad, I was intrigued by the Rangefinder design and the Hybrid EVF/OVF. Out of the box, I was a fan. The camera is small enough, I like the styling. The grip is adequate, but not great. Turning the camera on, I'm still a fan. The AF is very fast and the EVF is clean and crisp. The one lever switch to OVF from EVF is simple enough. Images, out of camera, I'm still a fan. They look great. The 35mm f2 is a nice lens. Light and sharp. Balances well with the camera. The ability to apply film styles is innovative. The ability to process RAW images in camera is impressive.

    So where am I not a fan? Basically it's simplicity and ease of use. The camera just has too much stuff. It's trying to be all things to all photographers. I think it lost the essence of a Rangefinder. There are way to many buttons and each button does way to many things. The wheels scroll and push. There are 7 function buttons, yet no way (that I could find) to back button focus. The spacing on the buttons are awkward. The menu systems are organized, but ridiculously deep. To me there is just to much. This was the camera that was created by designers listening to every nit feature that customers could dream up. It might be a technological tour de force, but the camera has no Soul. I ended up returning it. I wanted it as the camera I would drop on the passenger seat every time I went out. After two days, I knew that wouldn't be the case. It's a great camera, but it just doesn't work for me.
    Coming from my experience with Nikon FF DSLRs, the XP2's menu system is simple, and I like simple. My ALPA Max and Hasselblad collect dust because of my preference for the TC, and medium format does not get any simpler than that except when I am shooting my Mamiya 6 which has a built in meter. Seriously spend more time with the camera because my XP2 has lots of soul!



    Shot through a storm door. The XP2 is easy to handle and fast to respond. Look at that soul!!
    "Creativity takes courage." ~ Henri Matisse
    Darlene Almeda, photoscapes.com

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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    Quote Originally Posted by darr View Post
    Coming from my experience with Nikon FF DSLRs, the XP2's menu system is simple, and I like simple. My ALPA Max and Hasselblad collect dust because of my preference for the TC, and medium format does not get any simpler than that except when I am shooting my Mamiya 6 which has a built in meter. Seriously spend more time with the camera because my XP2 has lots of soul!



    Shot through a storm door. The XP2 is easy to handle and fast to respond. Look at that soul!!
    Darr,
    There is certainly much character to that image! The screen door creates a film-like quality. I'm going to try that.
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    Re: Test drove the Fuji X-PRO2. I'm a fan, well sort of.

    MK
    I'm late to the thread but I wanted to chime in. I sold all my Leica bodies and lenses why hit rate, no zoom, bad rangefinder those ar e the cons the pro were many. That being said I miss having the Leica M and the last firmware did solve many issues that made it a shootable camera for static subjects. That's where the XPro2 came into play I bought th e 18-55 and the. 100-400 you really need the 50-140 the 100-400 is good for distance but hard to use closer. The 56 is also on my hit list along with another body and one ove the 12-? Zoom to complete the kit. So I currently own the H6D 100 with 4 lenses and th Fuji kit and couldn't be happier it solves all my needs for professional and personal shooting.
    Shooting the XPro2 is easy ya like any camera you need to date it for a while and spend hours going over images to work out all and any mistakes you made in capture.
    Take the Hasselblad for example capture some high dynamic images or shoot a beach sunset, use. A light meter, use the meter in camera then take those supposedly perfect images into rawdigger or fast rawvier and behold...alll your exposures are out of whack. The Hasselblad H6D 100 when first released had a serious issue suffering from the. Blue and Red channel was one to one and a half stops under exposing. Now that they corrected that after having to prove to them with Rawdigger files it still needs a learning curve to shoot high dynamic or low light images. Don't go by the videos you see when the camera is shot in studio thethered and fully corrected for highlight and color shooting solution using Phocus.
    This hold true for every camera the Screen on the back unless it showing you a raw histogram and not a converted JPEG rendition you shooting blind in certain lighting and you images will be hit and miss.
    Bottom line when you know the limitations of your system you can then focus on only making images, at my age I forget more than I knew.

    Ha ha have fun with the Fuji until Leica make a better solution right now it doesn't exist!
    Oh shot with Fuji just for fun original image didn't look like this but files are very flexible.
    Click image for larger version. 

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