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Thread: Internet Security With MacIntosh

  1. #1
    Sean_Reid
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    Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I build my own Windows computers and have gotten to know the world of Windows, for better or worse, passably well. And on our XP machines, I use Kaspersky for Internet security. Norton's best days seem to be far behind them.

    I haven't owned a current Macintosh since about 1994 or so, and so I have lots to learn now that I may be switching over. I know that Macs, in general, have fewer virus problems, reportedly, than PCs but how much security software do they need and what software are folks using? Leopard has its own firewall, yes? Is that enough for the firewall.

    Educate me please if you'd be so kind.

    Thanks,

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Sean,

    I've had an older G5 for about 5 years and a Macbook Pro for a year. Have NEVER added any other protection to either machine and have had zero problems !! And, I use them daily for extended periods of time on the internet. Now I don't download a lot of crap, but do open numerous emails with attachments and so far no trouble. I hope this doesn't jinx me !!

    As an aside, thanks for your very easy to understand reviews. Many are way too technical. Now that I've given you all this praise, think I need to resubscribe !! Don't remember, but do you send out reminders?

    Just my experience,

    Jim

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Macs have essentially NO virus problems. You don't need a firewall. You don't need a virus scanner.

    OS X is UNIX, and it's got 30+ years of top-level geeks making it bulletproof. I avoided Macs until OS X came out. I don't think I'd switch now. Especially since I've made substantial investments in a Logic-based recording studio!

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Sean totally non technical answer but I thought the airport software also adds another layer of security.
    Like the others, I do not add extra security software to my macs.

  5. #5
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Thanks for the responses. It seems amazing to be able to run a computer on the web without a security suite.

    Jim,

    Thanks for the comments. We don't send renewal reminders because we're very low key about sales, etc. But you can request an expiration date from the site if needed or, if the subscription has lapsed, you'll know at log in.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  6. #6
    Member Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I just recently purchased a MacBook Pro, but I also run Windows on it because I use software that is made for PC's. My question about security is this, if I'm running Windows on the net with the Mac am I just as virus free?

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    Subscriber Member TRSmith's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I send and receive a lot of files from clients and in order to avoid any chance of embarrassment or liability, I use a software called VirusBarrier. It's completely invisible and seems bulletproof. Looking through the log of auto-scans for the past 5 years, I found only one item that was labeled as "infected" back in March of 2006. It intercepted and sanitized it before it could cause any damage.

    The MAC OS is worry free for the most part (re: viruses, etc.) but no system is completely hack-proof. I'm guessing that as Apple's market share grows it will attract more attention from the malevolent and bored. The last thing I want is to find out that I have inadvertently passed something nasty on to a client, so I opt for the belt and suspenders approach.

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Lockrey View Post
    I just recently purchased a MacBook Pro, but I also run Windows on it because I use software that is made for PC's. My question about security is this, if I'm running Windows on the net with the Mac am I just as virus free?
    You are on the Mac side, but not on the Windows side. Windows is Windows, no matter what computer it's running on at the moment.

  9. #9
    Member Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Maggie O View Post
    You are on the Mac side, but not on the Windows side. Windows is Windows, no matter what computer it's running on at the moment.
    Interesting. So it is a software thing.

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    The real issue is it's harder, but not impossible to hack Macs. (Mac doesn't load software components all over the place like Win does, meaning fewer entry points.) As was said above though, it's becoming more of an issue for Mac users as Mac gains market share.
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    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Never had a issue , i also use a airport extreme so my laser printer can be used wireless for all 4 computers in the house also.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Lockrey View Post
    Interesting. So it is a software thing.
    It is ever since the Mac moved to the Intel chipset.

  13. #13
    Member Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Maggie O View Post
    It is ever since the Mac moved to the Intel chipset.
    So I take it then if the Windows side is hacked then the whole 'puter is screwed.

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Well, not really. Just the Windows part of it. Windows can't talk to the OS X part in any meaningful way.

    If you got hacked, you could shut down, reboot in OS X and wipe the Windows files off your HD and then reinstall and start over with Windows.

  15. #15
    meilicke
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    If you are virtualizing your Windows world via VMware or Parallels (both have worked great for me, but there are subtle differences), use Time Machine to backup your virtual disk files. Then if you do get infected, just roll back to a prior version. I have done this in the past when I had a serious glitch and it worked like a champ. Alternatively, you can take snapshots with either tool, say one per week over a rolling month, and similarly roll back. The disadvantage to snapshots is that you have to manually make them, and they chew up disk space.

    Scott

  16. #16
    Member Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Maggie O View Post
    Well, not really. Just the Windows part of it. Windows can't talk to the OS X part in any meaningful way.

    If you got hacked, you could shut down, reboot in OS X and wipe the Windows files off your HD and then reinstall and start over with Windows.
    This is what I was hoping as to how it worked, that's one reason I went this route. BTW, the Mac Geek that sold me my system did say that the latest CS3 was 'made' for the 10.5.

  17. #17
    Member Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by meilicke View Post
    If you are virtualizing your Windows world via VMware or Parallels (both have worked great for me, but there are subtle differences), use Time Machine to backup your virtual disk files. Then if you do get infected, just roll back to a prior version. I have done this in the past when I had a serious glitch and it worked like a champ. Alternatively, you can take snapshots with either tool, say one per week over a rolling month, and similarly roll back. The disadvantage to snapshots is that you have to manually make them, and they chew up disk space.

    Scott
    This is an excellent tip, Scott. I was wondering what the Time Machine was all about. I still have to get used to how Macs do things. When I turn this on and attempt to choose a back up disk, the drop down window isn't giving me any choices. What am I missing??
    Last edited by Greg Lockrey; 17th January 2008 at 17:19.

  18. #18
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    If one's web browsing, e-mail, FTP, etc. (ie: all the stuff that requires Internet connectivity) is all being done using Mac programs, would a virus, trojan etc. be able to make its way to the Windows section because of the virtualization?

    Or would it need to actually enter through a Windows program that connected to the web? I ask because I'm hoping to use Windows emulation for just a couple of programs that do not, necessarily, need to have Internet access. In fact, Breezebrowser is really my only "go to" program (that I can think of) that doesn't have a Mac version.

    Ironically, some of the other programs I like and use are specifically designed to secure Windows, fix up the registry, etc.

    It's too bad my Netflix movie downloads are now in competition with Apple and require IE.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  19. #19
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    If one's web browsing, e-mail, FTP, etc. (ie: all the stuff that requires Internet connectivity) is all being done using Mac programs, would a virus, trojan etc. be able to make its way to the Windows section because of the virtualization?
    Nope. That would be impossible.

    You're good.

  20. #20
    Subscriber Member TRSmith's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Some pretty straightforward advice directly from Intel about security on Macs running Windows can be found here: http://www.intel.com/cd/personal/com...ome/339206.htm

  21. #21
    meilicke
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I was wondering what the Time Machine was all about. I still have to get used to how Macs do things. When I turn this on and attempt to choose a back up disk, the drop down window isn't giving me any choices. What am I missing??
    Greg, it sounds like you are missing an external drive, either directly attached to your mac or to another mac on your network. Having an external drive connected to an airport access point is not enough.

    Scott

  22. #22
    Member Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by meilicke View Post
    Greg, it sounds like you are missing an external drive, either directly attached to your mac or to another mac on your network. Having an external drive connected to an airport access point is not enough.

    Scott
    You mean I'm not done buying Mac stuff?

  23. #23
    meilicke
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Yeah, Apple is funny that way. Realistically you would buy an external drive for a PC as well to get some measure of data safety. The difference being that Apple requires it, so you are less likely to shoot yourself in the foot.

  24. #24
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Maggie O View Post
    Nope. That would be impossible.

    You're good.
    Cool. Breezebrowser is really useful to my work (and I've had its shortcuts, etc. memorized for years). It doesn't need regular access to the Internet at all. So I take it that installing a Windows virtualization program itself does not open the door to Internet security problems unless something in Windows need to access the web?

    I'm gradually starting to figure this out. Thanks Maggie.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  25. #25
    meilicke
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    So I take it that installing a Windows virtualization program itself does not open the door to Internet security problems unless something in Windows need to access the web?
    True. In fact, using virtualization software you can share your Internet connection with the Mac in such a way that the Windows box is completely hidden from the Internet. You can also run in a parallel mode, so that the Windows box seems like a peer along side the Mac, but unless an outside services needs to contact your Windows box (like in a corporate setting with central IT), there is little to no need for this mode.

  26. #26
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Thank you, this is getting clearer. Amazingly, I think I'm going to end up installing my virtualization software just so that I can run Breezebrowser. Otherwise, I'd be tempted to not install XP on the computer at all. But that one program is really key to my daily work. Everything else I use, it seems, has a Mac version.

    Can I hide the Windows area from the Internet using either Parallels or Fusion? Is one better than the other in this respect? What about the fact that XP itself, upon install, will probably want to connect to the Internet for updates, etc? Once that's done, can I block it from having web access? Might that be as simple as turning off auto-updates?

    Thanks all for the help. I am emphatically not an IT expert.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  27. #27
    meilicke
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I am emphatically not an IT expert
    I am no photographer, so we are getting closer to even (I owe you more I am afraid, since reading your reviews and posts)

    Either fusion or parallels can run in a 'shared private mode' (sorry, I forget the exact term the products use) equally well, at least in my experience. Consider this -

    At home, you have, in this order:
    1. Internet connection (cable, phone line, etc.)
    2. Then a router (some call it a modem)
    3. Then a cable (or wireless) connecting your router to your computer

    It is the router that hides your computer from the Internet. In exactly the same way, when using a shared private network between your Mac and the virtual Windows box, your Mac is a router. So then you have at home:

    1. Internet connection (cable, phone line, etc.)
    2. Then a router (some call it a modem)
    3. Then a cable (or wireless) connecting your router to your Mac
    4. Your Mac
    5. A virtual cable
    6. Your virtual Windows box

    The other way to run it is to share the same network that your Mac uses to talk to the Internet, just as if you had a physical Windows box connected to your router (#2 above). Likely not what you want.

    When you connect to a public wifi hot spot, that connection is essentially an untrusted network. You can no longer trust the router (#2) above, and so you will want to keep your virtual Windows box behind your Mac (shared private mode).

    Sorry about the long winded way to get to your question... but, I think your Windows box, as long as you are behind your home router or Mac, is reasonably safe from anyone trying to connect to you without you connecting to them first. It is only when you are surfing (and sometimes email, although I think that is less so with the excellent AV software out there now) that you may risk falling victim to a virus/trojan. While you can block Windows from the Internet using either virtualization product, I think getting MS updates is a great defense against virus/trojans, so please do not turn off auto-updates. An unpatched Mac is worse than a patched Windows box, security wise.

    -Scott

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    Subscriber Member TRSmith's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Scott: that was a very clear description. I have yet to run both OS so that was very helpful.

    I have a question. Suppose you download a file on the Mac side that's infected by a nasty aimed at Windows. Leopard ignores it and you save it to your hard drive. If you then access that same infected file from your windows side, aren't you vulnerable to the virus/worm?

    Tim

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I think the bottom line here is that if you have Windows on your Mac, you'd better have a anti-virus program. Kaspersky or BitDefender are among the best.

  30. #30
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Hi Simon,

    As I mentioned in my first post, I use Kaspersky and it is excellent though, to do its job well, it needs regular attention from me about what things are and are not allowed.

    If I could find a really great replacement for BB Pro I might be able to skip a Windows installation all together.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  31. #31
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    You know, after looking at Breezebrowser's website, I can't help but wonder if Apple's Aperture would be a suitable replacement on the Mac side. For that matter, Adobe's CS3 Bridge (which comes with Photoshop) might do the trick, too.

  32. #32
    meilicke
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I have a question. Suppose you download a file on the Mac side that's infected by a nasty aimed at Windows. Leopard ignores it and you save it to your hard drive. If you then access that same infected file from your windows side, aren't you vulnerable to the virus/worm?
    Tim, you are right on the money. Simon has the right idea, plus you can use Time Machine to recover if anything gets past your AV solution.

    Sean, I am not familiar with BB Pro, but what features are you looking for?

    -Scott

  33. #33
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by TRSmith View Post
    I have a question. Suppose you download a file on the Mac side that's infected by a nasty aimed at Windows. Leopard ignores it and you save it to your hard drive. If you then access that same infected file from your windows side, aren't you vulnerable to the virus/worm?

    Tim
    That is correct. There was no detection on the Mac side so the file is still infected. If in doubt first scan the file on the Windows side before opening.

    Not only operating systems can be vulnerable. Many applications that access the internet have a risk of being vulnerable too like Quicktime, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, Flash and Adobe Reader (not only the Windows versions). I personally believe you should always protect you system (Mac, Linux or Windows). For instance to avoid the change of distributing infected files to clients. You might be on a Mac, but they probably not.

  34. #34
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I work with large numbers of pictures so often and so extensively that I've developed very specific needs. C1 is my RAW developer of choice but it can't replace BB Pro. Bridge can't replace BB Pro. I'll look at Lightroom again and I'll need a Mac to try Aperture. What BB Pro has, and here I sound almost like a commercial, is a very intelligent set of tools and shortcuts that allow me to work very efficiently. There may be another program to match it but I'll need to find it.

    The way an image management program works, for me, is as specific and important as is the way a suspension works for a race car driver. I work a program like that so hard that it really needs to be bang-on.

    Thanks for the ideas.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  35. #35
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Sean, it would really help if you could tell us exactly what BBPro does and how it does it, because without that info, we can only guess at what you want.

  36. #36
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Hi Sean, You might want to look at Parallels Desktop http://www.parallels.com/en/products/desktop/. You can run Windows applications like native Mac applications and than open your image files directly in the Mac version of Photoshop for instance.

  37. #37
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Hi Wouter,

    Yes, thanks, the plan was use either Parallels or Fusion to run BB Pro. I'd just really love to avoid installing Windows at all if I can.

    Anyone have experience with CrossOver Mac? It apparently is a bottle program that allows one to use some Windows programs (BB seems to be one of them) on Mac OS-X without installing windows.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  38. #38
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Hi Maggie,

    You're right, of course. It's a great question for the thread and for me to ask myself. Here are some things that I find useful (they aren't all unique to BB Pro, I'm sure):

    - Ability to toggle a color picture between a color and BW version using just "Control W", setting stays at color or BW for other pictures until/unless reset

    - Ability to do a relative batch adjust the date/time data for a folder of pictures. (This can be invaluable on a shoot done with multiple bodies/photographers where one of the cameras wasn't synched with the others)

    - Ability to go to full screen, 100% version with "Control B"

    - Ability to toggle a given picture between a full screen, resized, view and view with histogram plus EXIF using "Control Tab"

    - RAW + JPEG files are automatically associated and moved/organized as if they were one file (unless one sets them to work otherwise). The folder can be set to show only the RAW files as thumbnails but the previews will all draw from the JPEG versions

    - abilility to tag/untag, tag selected, untag selected, select only tagged, etc.

    - adjustable thumbnail sizes

    - right/left arrow key shortcuts to move through folders of pictures

    - full folder operations available

    - ability to sort and order pictures by EXIF fields (by aperture, by shutter speed, etc.), also by timestamp, etc.

    - ability to view a picture full screen and also toggle a histogram view on and off using "Control A"

    - ability to preview a picture sharpened (degree can be set in preferences) using "Control Q"

    Cheers,

    Sean

  39. #39
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Hmm...according to MacWorld:

    " Viruses, malware not as much of an issue

    Another benefit of CrossOver Mac’s approach to running Windows software is that it’s much less susceptible to infection by Windows-based viruses or malware than a true Windows-based solution, according to Parshall.

    “A virus needs to affect the guts of Windows,” he explained. “Theoretically, if you were really, really good you might be able to get your virus to run under WINE, but we’ve yet to hear about anyone who has, even in the laboratory.”

    Parshall said he expects that this protection will extend to CrossOver Mac as well."

    http://www.macworld.com/article/5163...crossover.html

    Cheers,

    Sean

  40. #40
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh


  41. #41
    Subscriber Member TRSmith's Avatar
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    In response to your list of frequently used features of BB Pro, here is a link to a list of the keyboard commands available in Lightroom: http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/l...shortcuts.html

    It may not have every single feature you're used to, but it has most of them. Might be worth downloading the Lightroom demo and giving it a shot.

  42. #42
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Thanks and, yes, I will. It's long-overdue, actually. Adobe has contacted me about beta-testing various programs but I just haven't had enough time free to do a proper job with that. But I'll download Lightroom today.

    Cheers,

    Sean

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Command + shift + E is the Export command than hit enter to process and right arrow key in develop mode to next image. My fingers are formed that way from overuse. Sean you can really fly fast with LR
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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  44. #44
    Lewis
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    I LOVE my Mac Powerbook G4!

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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Well, I just got a Mobile Broadband Express card, for MacBook Pro, from Telecom New Zealand, = internet anywhere in cellphone coverage areas. It took the telecom person 2 hours work to get it going, had to take "Internet Connect" out of Applications, put it in Desktop and Dock. Do not know why, however it works. ?Something to do with Telecom NZ not supporting Mac/Express card.

    So, been surfing internet a lot, made purchases with paypal. Yip...freee as a bird now

    Results of a 1MB download test.
    Below is the data used to calculate your download speed:

    Download time: 5.105 seconds
    Size of file: 1058 Kilobytes
    Estimated line speed: 1691.1 (kilobits/second)
    Estimated line speed: 207.2 (kilobytes/second)

  46. #46
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    If one's web browsing, e-mail, FTP, etc. (ie: all the stuff that requires Internet connectivity) is all being done using Mac programs, would a virus, trojan etc. be able to make its way to the Windows section because of the virtualization?

    Or would it need to actually enter through a Windows program that connected to the web? I ask because I'm hoping to use Windows emulation for just a couple of programs that do not, necessarily, need to have Internet access. In fact, Breezebrowser is really my only "go to" program (that I can think of) that doesn't have a Mac version.

    Ironically, some of the other programs I like and use are specifically designed to secure Windows, fix up the registry, etc.

    It's too bad my Netflix movie downloads are now in competition with Apple and require IE.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Time for me to chime in as an IT professional of 20+ years and one who has administered and secured networks of all stripes for about the last 10+ years.

    And to do so in a more lighthearted vein (computer security is notoriously dry and boring) we are about to play an episode of Computer Security Mythbusters!

    Myth #1: The Mac is immune to viruses and hacking - FALSE

    The Mac represents a far smaller share of the personal computer market than Windows based systems. It's all simple economics. Why write a virus that only affects a tiny percentage of the population? Hackers and virus authors target low-hanging fruit. UNIX based systems were designed by engineers for engineers, not by security minded folks. Check the update logs of any UNIX (or UNIX derived) OS to see how many patches are released to close security holes. If you want a really bulletproof OS, use OpenBSD which has the best security track record of all computer OS's.

    Myth #2: Virtualized Windows systems can't get infected. - FALSE

    A virtualized Windows system is just as vulnerable as a hardware hosted one. The VM will need antivirus/antispyware/firewalls as well. Be sure to include them in the cost of the build. Granted, the use of Time Machine or other snapshot systems makes it easier to roll back to a pre-infected state but any system connected to the public internet is a target. Therefore, it stands to reason that if you never connect your Windows VM to the internet, you greatly reduce the chances of infection. Also, hackers won't target a non-connected machine as it is of very little use to them.

    Myth #3: Really good Internet security is really expensive and complicated - FALSE

    Unified Threat Management systems (UTM's) are used in enterprise networks to mitigate threats and secure the network. Such technology is also available to the home/SOHO user for little or no cost. I will be publishing a review of three UTM's (Untangle, Astaro Secure Gateway, & ComixWall) which can be deployed on small networks at no cost beyond dedicating a single machine to becoming an edge device on your network. The article will be published on PlanetX64 soon, but you can read a preview of it on my blog.

    Myth #4: If I setup one of these UTM thingies, I don't need to install security software on the rest of my computers. - FALSE

    The phrase "Don't put all of your eggs in one basket" comes to mind here. Relying on an edge device solely as your line of defense is foolish. The best defense is called layered defense. Yes, your UTM scans for viruses, spam, phishing attempts and other nasties, but the best practice in this scenario is to have security software on each machine in your network (where possible). Internal firewalls (called bastion firewalls) add another stumbling block to a hacker trying to gain entry into your network. Antivirus software (of a different brand) on your workstation will assist in catching any viruses the UTM may miss.

    These topics and more will be covered in my article. I hope that this has helped you guys get an idea of how to do this properly. The article will cover the ease-of-use of these systems as well as the features and performance.
    Carlos Echenique | Carlos Echenique Photography |Olympus OM-D E-M1 MK II | Olympus Pen-F - M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 25mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8, Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS, M.Zuiko 75mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

  47. #47
    7ian7
    Guest

    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Bridge is a fantastic editing tool precisely because of it's deceptively drilled-down functionality. Since i began using it just a few assignments back, I've been spending much less time in the "placeholder utility" universe, more quickly committing to selections and proceeding to full-on processing.

    I encourage anyone was turned-off by Bridge's earlier incarnations (as I was), to check out how it has evolved.

  48. #48
    7ian7
    Guest

    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Regarding MAC security, for what storage costs these days, an up-to-date but disconnected terabyte backup external drive is never a bad idea.

  49. #49
    Senior Member
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    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    Regarding other people's comments on Mac security I'd agree that a security suite isn't currently needed. I've been using my Macs for about 5 years and never had security installed and I haven't had any problems. My laptop went for about 4 years through two OS upgrades, but I never reinstalled.

    VMware Fusion vs Parallels vs Crossover. I'm using Parallels right now, mainly because it's the first one I bought and it's the only one that runs a game I rarely play. Parallels maybe has the most features, but it is also the biggest resource hog. If you can get the software to work with Crossover that would probably be the best. Otherwise I'd go with Fusion over parallels right now. From a couple trials and other people's experiences it seems more responsive and uses less resources.

    Another note on VM machines. If you give your Windows VM machine access to your Mac drive viruses on your Windows machine could possibly do something to your Mac drive. Not as likely though. Parallels tends to make it easier for your Windows machine to interact with the Mac side, while Fusion tends to isolate the two making it a little safer. Crossover I'm not as sure about, but I've also read it's less likely to infection then the other two. I also believe every application runs in it's own separate container making it safer and you only have to reinstall one app rather then the whole machine if there is a problem.

  50. #50
    Sean_Reid
    Guest

    Re: Internet Security With MacIntosh

    What I'm doing now is running Fusion with Kaspersky installed in the XP virtual machine.

    Cheers,

    Sean

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