Site Sponsors
Results 1 to 47 of 47

Thread: Digital Asset Management

  1. #1
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Digital Asset Management

    I'm about to revamp my image filing system with an eye towards a more logical and comprehensive structure. This is a bit of a daunting task and I'd like to make sure that, once done, I never have to do it again. My current plan is to group images by content type with a keyword(s) that will clue me in as to what's in the folder. By way of example, one of my main groupings will be Landscape, Subfolder: Sunsets ; Sub-sub folder: Merritt Island Preserve (a location I've shot at frequently). This structure has the advantage of having all my Sunsets in one folder but the disadvantage that I will need to break up a shoot into separate folders, e.g. if I shot Birds during that shoot they would go into Landscape>Birds. I'm not an event shooter so filing by date doesn't seem appropriate for me. I mean, who cares whether the sunset was shot in 2007 or 2008. Any suggestions about how to best organize will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    David,
    This is always a difficult thing to do. If you use the meta data tags for keywords and stuff, and also have a tool that searches those, it can be a bit less daunting. If not, there will always be some shots "lost" in other folders, relying upon your memory to find them.

    I am an event shooter, so storing stuff by date is more logical, but even there, I do break things out by subject or location. For example, I shoot wildlife at a nearby state park, so it gets its own folder, but then subfolders are done by date, and sometimes by subject, such as Brazos Bend SP > 061508 > Alligators, or Shore Birds, etc. Could just as easily swap those folders/subfolders to become Brazos Bend SP > Alligators > date, or type (close-ups, breeding, feeding, etc.) where date may be less important.

    A lot really depends on what kinds of things you shoot, and how much you shoot of them, as that gives you some idea of how finely you may want to divide subjects in sub- or sub-sub-folders. I also rename all of my files to start with the date, so even if they are redtributed into other folders, I will at least know what season things were shot.

    I use Aperture on my Macs, and am still mapping out the keywords and stuff I will apply to images for searching. The nice thing here is being able to leave all the images in whatever folder they started (by shoot date), importing things as referenced files, and then tagging keywords to those and rearranging their locations within Aperture, not the original file folder structure. Not sure if there is a similar capability in LR, since I do not use it. The nice part about having a fairly clean folder structure is that you can then access it by any other tool, such as Bridge, C1, etc. The downside to being too defined with subfolders is dividing things out in a way that may make it really hard to find anything after a while. This is the real plus of a good DAM tool like Aperture, since it will let you search for things in so many ways....as long as you tag the keywords for it to search. That is where placing "birds", "sunsets", "ripples", etc., into the keywords will let you find things more easily. If you do not use the meta data, breaking thing out into the folder structure you suggest will work for you, but you will still run the risk of forgetting where some things may be located. Different folks recall things differently. I tend to think about each shooting session as its own package, even if it covers more than one subject. If it covers too many, I usually break things down within the shooting session (event date) as subfolders. But that is how I tend to recall things. Placing all "sunsets" in one folder will work also, but I prefer creating those collections on the fly with the searches from the large database of images in Aperture.

    Doing good DAM has components of both technical structure, and personal preferences in it, so no one method is best for all.

    LJ

  3. #3
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    LJ,
    Thanks for the input. I'm using Aperture as well so I can relate to advantages of the keyword tags and also that, even if the files are in different locations they can still be imported into the same Aperture project folder. Curious if you limit the number of images in a given Aperture Project. I'm finding that a project with several hundred images seems to get bogged down with thumbnail generation, etc. Just for the record, where I originally went wrong was by filing my images by camera used so that if I shot with both my Aptus back and my Canon I had two folders from the same shoot. I did this thinking that it would be safer not to mix different file types within the same folder since I was using different software to process them. It wasn't such a bad idea until the camera folders started to proliferate... Canon, Nikon, Aptus back, Sinar, etc. The problem with this system is that now I have to remember what I shot with This is what I'm in the process of undoing.

  4. #4
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    LJ,
    Thanks for the input. I'm using Aperture as well so I can relate to advantages of the keyword tags and also that, even if the files are in different locations they can still be imported into the same Aperture project folder. Curious if you limit the number of images in a given Aperture Project. I'm finding that a project with several hundred images seems to get bogged down with thumbnail generation, etc. Just for the record, where I originally went wrong was by filing my images by camera used so that if I shot with both my Aptus back and my Canon I had two folders from the same shoot. I did this thinking that it would be safer not to mix different file types within the same folder since I was using different software to process them. It wasn't such a bad idea until the camera folders started to proliferate... Canon, Nikon, Aptus back, Sinar, etc. The problem with this system is that now I have to remember what I shot with This is what I'm in the process of undoing.
    Hi David
    I use Aperture too (love it).
    I fiddled about with lots of different methods, and what I currently do is to use folders by date e.g.

    2008 subfolders 2008 01 suffolk, 2008 01 holland, 2008 02 cornwall, 2008 04 grogono wedding etc.

    I reflect this structure in Aperture, with a folder for each year, and a sub folder for each trip per month (so I have 12 projects per year for Suffolk, which is where I live).

    I then use keywording for subjects / people whatever, so that if I need to find sunsets, then I simply do a library filter on sunsets. Nowadays I don't store any other shots than the original RAW - everything is made on the fly as needed - this makes organisation and concurrency a great deal easier.

    I keep all files on an external 1TB drive, and the Aperture library in the Pictures folder on my Desktop - that way, if I'm travelling and need it, I can copy the Aperture library to my laptop and take the external drive with me.

    I did think of splitting on subject, but I could see chaos looming . . . what do you do with that picture of your neice running in the waves in a sunset on the Scilly Isles? put it in three places? have a nervous breakdown?

    The way I do it the decisions are simple - that shot goes in it's correct date frame - I can easily add keywords for 'sunset', 'family', 'Scilly Isles'.

    I hope this helps

    Just this guy you know

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    David,
    You can create multiple Libraries with Aperture also. I am doing that now since some of my collections are just way too big. If you do create a new Library, you do have to attach to it and then restart Aperture, which is a bit of a pain. (However, rumor has it that Apple is working on being able to select Libraries without having to restart the app. Keeping my fingers crossed for that update!)

    In any event, you can create a new Library, and then export from your old Library to be imported to the new one in a new organizational scheme, should you want to do that. You just need to have some extra drives or disk space to do all of this, but in the end, you will be able to get things into the scheme that works best for you. Also, as Jono points out, it is good to make Folders in the Library and then have Projects beneath those folders. So you could have a Folder of Landscapes with Projects below that for several places. Since they are all in the main Library, you can do the keyword search on the Library, and pull from any/all Folders and Projects to find what you want. This is a very flexible system, contrary to what some folks have complained about in the past.

    So, you could rearrange all those camera folders by subject/date/location, or whatever you wanted and mix and match the entries from various cameras. (That camera info will always be in the EXIF data, so it does not really matter. If you need to shell out to a different RAW processor, you could export the RAW file for that and then re-import any referenced file.

    The performance hit comes with creating the thumbnails and previews. There are ways to speed that process up by adjusting those file creations (lower res or off, then creating a higher res version when editing the selects). As mentioned, I do not import the RAW files, nor any images completed outside of Aperture into the Folders and Projects in my Aperture Library. I leave all of those in their original folder locations on the various storage drives of my system. This keeps the Aperture Library a lot smaller, holding only thumbnails, previews and instruction sets. However, I do need to be attached to the original source file locations for exporting and stuff. I keep the Aperture Library on my MacBook Pro very small and delete or add Projects as needed to show folks things. I keep a master Library connected to my G5, but can be networked from the laptop. There are a ton of ways of organizing and using things, so what works for one may not be best for another. Since I have about 14TB of files now, no way I can keep all of that in a single Library, but I can keep the references in a relatively compact Library that allows me to search, breeze through things, etc., very quickly.

    Sorry of all that starts to sound jumbled, but as I have discovered, you can pretty much take things in any direction you want with Aperture for DAM.

    LJ

  6. #6
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Jono,
    It helps a lot... it's precisely the shot of your niece that's giving me pause about trying to create my filing structure. I sketched out a possible filing structure for my files and, before I was half thru, could see the problem. Where to put that odd sunset or macro shot that I took during a model shoot. Maybe keywording is what really needs my attention and file by date as you do. My head hurts thinking about this

  7. #7
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    LJ, 14 TB of images... my head hurts for you too

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Jono,
    It helps a lot... it's precisely the shot of your niece that's giving me pause about trying to create my filing structure. I sketched out a possible filing structure for my files and, before I was half thru, could see the problem. Where to put that odd sunset or macro shot that I took during a model shoot. Maybe keywording is what really needs my attention and file by date as you do. My head hurts thinking about this
    Keywording is THE key to success for this stuff. Aperture allows lots of keywords and even an hierarchy, so you can narrow things down quite a bit. Might be worth spending a bit of time thinking about those keywords. Once you have a good start there, it just will take time to apply to the various files, but then you are golden. And you can always add things later if you wanted. Keeping diligent with the keyword entries upon import is important, I have found.

    As for the 14TBs.....during peak equestrian and polo seasons, I sometimes shoot 3-5k frames a week. That adds up really fast. I am terrible about culliing on those, as many times I need to go back to a frame before or after a key image for some clients.

    LJ

  9. #9
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    I organize by date then shoot as well. Inside the shoot folder I often create subfolders by day, then even separate further by subject. Not perfect, but it has worked very well for me for the last several years. I used to cull, but don't bother anymore -- drive space has gotten cheap and occasionally enough, I'VE gone back and reworked a file or found a crop from another I would have discarded on the initial pass...
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  10. #10
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Thanks guys... I'm starting to get the picture. Couple of follow ups please. Are you renaming your images following import. Take a model shoot with Carol who does four wardrobe changes. Is it wise to rename the images, Carol Red Top; Carol White Dress, etc or does this make finding the original RAW image (should you need it) more problematic. Also, do you put your processed images into a separate Develops folder inside the shoot folder or just let them mix in and organize the folder by file type (as I believe Jack does).

  11. #11
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Thanks guys... I'm starting to get the picture. Couple of follow ups please. Are you renaming your images following import. Take a model shoot with Carol who does four wardrobe changes. Is it wise to rename the images, Carol Red Top; Carol White Dress, etc or does this make finding the original RAW image (should you need it) more problematic. Also, do you put your processed images into a separate Develops folder inside the shoot folder or just let them mix in and organize the folder by file type (as I believe Jack does).
    David You need to keep the integrity of the original card or you will lose your backup scheme. 2008-07-01.3 Paris......would be my the third card imported from my Paris trip shot on July 1,2008. This folds into 2008 Paris and then 2008. I keep this independent of my processing software (Lightroom) . Your requirement is typically solved by coding key words into the metadata . This requires a lot of thought and you will change your mind overtime. Beyond a few keywords will be overkill for most . IMHO an important decision that isn t frequently mentioned ...how will you edit ... Using your example ..lets say you shot Carol a few times a year ...even if you have a few thousand images .....the best 10% can be reviewed in a few minutes . You could add metadata to the top images. In other words I would recommend editing/rating before investing time in adding keywords. Roger

  12. #12
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Roger, I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean by keeping the integrity of my original card... maybe you could explain that a bit more. I'm a bit surprised to find you filing by date too since I put both of us in the advanced amateur category and neither of us shoots extensively for clients. Sitting here I can think of a few of my best images I've taken over the years and I can recall the content and remember where I took them. I guess those are my keywords. I can't remember what year they were taken nor, any longer, can I remember which camera I took them with. If I had all my images keyworded and rated I'm sure I could put my hands on them pretty quickly... assuming that the keywords and rating system were being recognized by the software (Aperture) I'm now using. I can't help but think that there's more than a touch of irony in the fact that, in my business life (whether practicing law or doing construction) , my filing system was as good as anybody's, and that was with paper. Very few pieces of paper just got thrown into a folder... might as well throw them in the garbage if you can't retrieve them when needed. None of my file cabinets or folders were organized by date (with the exception of the "correspondence" file within each folder which always had the most recent item on top). They were all organized alphabetically.

  13. #13
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Thanks guys... I'm starting to get the picture. Couple of follow ups please. Are you renaming your images following import. Take a model shoot with Carol who does four wardrobe changes. Is it wise to rename the images, Carol Red Top; Carol White Dress, etc or does this make finding the original RAW image (should you need it) more problematic. Also, do you put your processed images into a separate Develops folder inside the shoot folder or just let them mix in and organize the folder by file type (as I believe Jack does).
    Hi David
    Unlike Glen I don't have separate folders for cards - I think it's unnecessarily cumbersome - just months and shoots.

    I NEVER rename files on import BUT I do change the file naming in the camera to identify:
    1. the camera
    2. the month

    so I've renamed the D7 files (which would be DSC) to:
    D7 7 (then the sequential number)
    the D7 indicating the camera, and the 7 indicating the month. (I'll probably start putting a year prefix on as well - I do that with the M8 files.

    I find it sometimes helps in finding a file quickly or naming the camera that someone refers to on a website or something.

    As for renaming files with reference to a subject - there isn't any need if you keyword properly.

    Incidentally, although it's a big ask, if you've organised your library by date, you can keyword a month every day until it's done - cumbersome, but if you get into a routine it's not the end of the world . . . and searches become soooo rewarding!

    I don't have any processed files to relocate - I only save exported files when needed for a client. . . .Oh, except the occasional tiff file created when using Viveza or another plug in - these are by default given the same name as the Aperture version, and are created in the same place - suits me fine, and I leave it like that.

    Just this guy you know

  14. #14
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    David:

    I do not keep cards in separate folders either, and I also have my camera's identified by the filename. If it is a big shoot, the Raws, Converted, and Final (for delivery) or Print files all get saved in subfolders with those names nested inside the original shoot folder.

    I keep the original filename with the processed file too. So in my case, if the raw is CF028121.tif, I would use my software (C1) to rename on initial processing with the shoot data so processed raws in the "Converted" subfolder might look something like "CarolRedDress_CF028121. In this fashion I can get back to the raw again easily. Next, if I modify the converted file in CS, then the name gets truncated, but saved in the same shoot folder to the "Final" or "Print". So in the "Print" subfolder you might see CarolRedDress_16x24_8121. The last "8121" keeps it enough connected to the original raw to be able to find it, but separate from say a similar file in the same shoot that might be labeled CarolRedDress_16x24_8133.

    My total file path for the above shoot's raw files would look something like:
    Images/2008/Carol_080626/Raws/CF028121.tif. Note the date after Carol is the day of that shoot in YYMMDD format so the daily subfolders of a multi-day shoot will always automatically sort in chronological order.

    Hope that helps,
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  15. #15
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Jack, it does help and your naming convention makes a lot of sense. I can do what you're doing with my Sinar dng files after they've been converted from RAW. It still might make sense for a Sinar shooter to save the CF card to a folder within the shoot so that the "true" RAW's are still available should the processing software improve.

    Jono, if you're so inclined I'd love to see a screen shot of your Aperture projects directory. I have a feeling you know your way around that program better than I and are handling things better.

  16. #16
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Roger, I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean by keeping the integrity of my original card... maybe you could explain that a bit more. I'm a bit surprised to find you filing by date too since I put both of us in the advanced amateur category and neither of us shoots extensively for clients. Sitting here I can think of a few of my best images I've taken over the years and I can recall the content and remember where I took them. I guess those are my keywords. I can't remember what year they were taken nor, any longer, can I remember which camera I took them with. If I had all my images keyworded and rated I'm sure I could put my hands on them pretty quickly... assuming that the keywords and rating system were being recognized by the software (Aperture) I'm now using. I can't help but think that there's more than a touch of irony in the fact that, in my business life (whether practicing law or doing construction) , my filing system was as good as anybody's, and that was with paper. Very few pieces of paper just got thrown into a folder... might as well throw them in the garbage if you can't retrieve them when needed. None of my file cabinets or folders were organized by date (with the exception of the "correspondence" file within each folder which always had the most recent item on top). They were all organized alphabetically.
    David My system isn t purely by date....its by year....then by subject/location/event ...so I might have a folder on Paris ...called 2008 Paris . Using my Paris example.....I have a folder 2008 Paris ....next level down are the actual cards as I imported them 2008-07-01.3 Paris . So I have maybe 25 card imports identified. This is 2000 images ..I shoot maybe 20K per year. If I did more than one trip to Paris in 2008 ..I would add a an intermediate folder ....2008-07 Paris . Out of the 2000 raw images ...I try to edit down to 300 that I might ever use. These are flagged. Then I rate the 300 selectively getting them down to 120 then 60 and finally 24. By using the flags and ratings I can go in with 2008 Paris and find my best images in minutes . You don t have to remember which card its on ....only that it was in Paris in 2008 . Four issues with this approach.....one...it works best when you follow a practice of downloading frequently ..at least daily as this tends to keep the subject matter at least similar....two...you have to edit and rate the images as you go (otherwise you find yourself searching thru thousands ) three ...you must use keywording to create alternative views of the images(I haven t needed them) and four ...your flags and ratings are managed by either Aperture , Lightroom, CS3 etc. Keywording can be done at any stage..so on import ..I might add Paris,M8,Seine etc to the keywords ..later I might add Carolyn to a specific image. ............................................ OK How is this different from a more meaningful (or significant) set of folders? If you have a folder for Carol and a subfolder for Carol Red Sweater ..then How do you file Carol and Allison together or a shot illustrating a particular lighting technique? You need multiple copies to accomplish this. This is why the stock photographers rely on the metadata keywords. .........My point of view (my requirements may be different than others) . Its easy to spend a lot of time coding,filing,processing and admiring the thousands of digital images we can take each year. This can be fun for awhile; but , I need to get at the best and forget the rest. I did some rough estimates of my requirements......maximum 20K images per year . Thats 100K images in five years. Top 10% (2000) found in 10 folders (200 each). Its from the top 10% that I plan to work on post processing for web presentation and prints. .....Another way of saying this ...if I was trying to find that great shot of my Golden at the beach....I would look in 2008 Jupiter and select on ratings 2 and above ..do a grid view and I would have it in 5 minutes maximum. ........Another set of tools that you can use (at least in lightroom ) are the collections ....for example I am trying to build a multiyear collection on Kiteboarders.....I just keep adding my best kiteboarding shots as I go ..Lightroom maintains a pointer to the original and I can get at my best 300-400 images directly ...no limit on the duplicate use of an image ..and I am always just pointing to the original. ....Sorry if this is confusing...the key point is that any significant numbering scheme has the potential to breakdown ..if its used to provide the organization structure. ...Two sources of information....the DAM book O'reilly publishing and the Luminous Landscape tuitorial videos.

  17. #17
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Jono I use Mac OS X and Lightroom as the backbone of my DAM. While I know there are benefits to importing thru Lightroom or Aperture ....I create a single folder for an event/location/major shoot or subject . In my example 2008 Paris . I drag the card to my desktop and into the 2008 Paris folder and rename the card only ...2008-07-01.3 Paris . I then import the 2008 Paris folder into Lightroom referencing the originals (rather than importing them) . Lightroom only imports the new images but retains the full folder /card structure. This facilitates great flexibility to my backup scheme...on a short trip ..the cards act as a backup . (I generally Backup the entire 2008 Paris folder to an external drive as well). Once home I can off load the 2008 Paris folder to my external drives and do a decent backup. I pace myself through each card flagging the images worthy of further review. Once I have done this I am always working at the 2008 Paris level. Having the card identified keeps me honest on whats been imported,backedup and had a first pass at editing ..nothing more. The only other use I have had for them is to create an intermediate folder after the fact. Say I went to Paris again in October..I would want a 2008 Paris October folder and would create a 2008 Paris June one for the previous cards/images . There is really no overhead or complexity involved .....as the card level is ignored for most every use of the images after the initial pass and backup. Roger

  18. #18
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Roger, thanks for expanding on this. I do see the logic to your system and there's a lot to be said for not wasting time on images that we're not likely ever to use. With my Sinar files I don't believe I can rename the CF card at least not if I want to use Exposure software to make the conversions. If I do the program won't recognize the folder name.

  19. #19
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    Jono I use Mac OS X and Lightroom as the backbone of my DAM. While I know there are benefits to importing thru Lightroom or Aperture ....I create a single folder for an event/location/major shoot or subject . In my example 2008 Paris . I drag the card to my desktop and into the 2008 Paris folder and rename the card only ...2008-07-01.3 Paris . I then import the 2008 Paris folder into Lightroom referencing the originals (rather than importing them) . Lightroom only imports the new images but retains the full folder /card structure. This facilitates great flexibility to my backup scheme...on a short trip ..the cards act as a backup . (I generally Backup the entire 2008 Paris folder to an external drive as well). Once home I can off load the 2008 Paris folder to my external drives and do a decent backup. I pace myself through each card flagging the images worthy of further review. Once I have done this I am always working at the 2008 Paris level. Having the card identified keeps me honest on whats been imported,backedup and had a first pass at editing ..nothing more. The only other use I have had for them is to create an intermediate folder after the fact. Say I went to Paris again in October..I would want a 2008 Paris October folder and would create a 2008 Paris June one for the previous cards/images . There is really no overhead or complexity involved .....as the card level is ignored for most every use of the images after the initial pass and backup. Roger
    Hi Glen
    I only reference files as well - importing to the library makes it huge and unwieldy - it's just that I don't have separate folders for files from a shoot.

    So, if I have a folder:

    \\external_drive\aperture\2008\2008 07 smithwedding\D700

    then all the shots from that wedding will be copied to that folder - from different cards

    I'll then 'import' them by referencing them (just as you do). I agree, it makes backup simpler (I do it with time machine to another drive).

    Just this guy you know

  20. #20
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Hi Glen
    I only reference files as well - importing to the library makes it huge and unwieldy - it's just that I don't have separate folders for files from a shoot.

    So, if I have a folder:

    \\external_drive\aperture\2008\2008 07 smithwedding\D700

    then all the shots from that wedding will be copied to that folder - from different cards

    I'll then 'import' them by referencing them (just as you do). I agree, it makes backup simpler (I do it with time machine to another drive).
    Small difference in our approaches then ..after import ...i would be working at the wedding level as well. What I feel is important is that David doesn t establish subfolders within the wedding folder ..rather using some combination of flagging,rating and keywords to support his search requirements. If I was still shooting weddings or events ..break it down by 2008 Weddings/Brown Wedding ....below that the editing flags would work and I might only use limited keywording.

  21. #21
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    What I feel is important is that David doesn t establish subfolders within the wedding folder ..rather using some combination of flagging,rating and keywords to support his search requirements.
    Roger,
    I have been creating a Develops subfolder of late and, on occasion, a Selects subfolder which contains the images selected by the model. I think Jack has talked me out of the Develops folder and I suppose I could handle the Selects with flags or ratings.

  22. #22
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Roger,
    I have been creating a Develops subfolder of late and, on occasion, a Selects subfolder which contains the images selected by the model. I think Jack has talked me out of the Develops folder and I suppose I could handle the Selects with flags or ratings.
    Lightroom and Aperture will both work end to end for most requirements...but I would expect that if you want/need to use another raw convertor ...your workflow would have to handle a post conversion file as well as the original raw. Otherwise you can not go back to the raw ...as the raw convertors improve. I had good advice on this in a previous post but still can t seem to get my arms around it.

  23. #23
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    FTR, I am not anal about subfolders. I use them a lot on larger shoots, and rarely on smaller shoots. IOW their use is predicated on the shoot. So I would say use them if and when they make sense, don't bother with them if they don't; ou can always add them later. Your cataloging software will browse them regardless...

    But you do have a workflow constraint with your Sinar raw files in that the software basically forces you to convert your camera raw file to another usable raw format (DNG?) before you can manipulate it in conventional programs. So I would definitely keep a pair of subfolders, one with just the original camera-generated raws and a separate one with the DNG raws (or whatever they are), so you can easily access the original files for future reprocessing when Sinar gets the workflow constraints ironed out, or if a better raw processor comes along...

    Cheers,
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  24. #24
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Don t we have a similar set of issues on the output end of the process. If I remember correctly (from Jack s workflow) ..you go back into CS3 for final sharpening and other adjustments tailored to your print or web output. I am assuming that these are ..overtime ..optimized for a specific printer/paper combination. Since I might want to print another exact print...don t I also save my print files? Right now I just create a folder of my print files..the volume is low enough that its not an issue.

  25. #25
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    Don t we have a similar set of issues on the output end of the process. If I remember correctly (from Jack s workflow) ..you go back into CS3 for final sharpening and other adjustments tailored to your print or web output. I am assuming that these are ..overtime ..optimized for a specific printer/paper combination. Since I might want to print another exact print...don t I also save my print files? Right now I just create a folder of my print files..the volume is low enough that its not an issue.
    Let me try and clarify. One of my large shoot subfolders is usually going to be for "Print". I do work a file to it's optimal for output at its native size, then uprez or downrez and adjust output sharpening based on that final size. So my print files always have the size as part of the filename. Using my previous example, I might have both a CarolRedDress_16x24_8133 and a CarolRedDress_12x18_8133. Assuming this is a large shoot, I would have both of these in the same subfolder: Images/2008/Carol_080626/Print
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  26. #26
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Jack, do you have a specific file type that you always print from, i.e. jpeg, tiff, psd, or does it vary.

  27. #27
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    I have been creating a Develops subfolder of late and, on occasion, a Selects subfolder which contains the images selected by the model. I think Jack has talked me out of the Develops folder and I suppose I could handle the Selects with flags or ratings.
    David
    Not only do I not think you need a Develops subfolder - I think it's a bad idea . . . but not as bad as a Selects subfolder - just make a selects_smart_album within your project in Aperture - use 5* as the criteria, then as you mark shots as 5* they'll go straight into your album - if you mark them back they'll come out.

    Instead of using a develops subfolder use versions in Aperture - if you're processing in CS3 / viveza / whatever, then do it from within aperture - it'll make a new version up and store it with the original in the same folder. You can easily see it in your aperture library (preferably kept in a stack with the original RAW file). If you must have a version for printing you can keep that there as well - give it a keyword 'printing' if you like.

    The minute you shell out organisational work from within Aperture to something else, be it file structure or whatever, then you are missing the DAM point - instead of thinking what you want outside Aperture, think what you want inside Aperture. It makes life so much easier for backup and everything.

    I understand that Jack has developed a workflow over a long period, and he may shoot me down in flames - I had a similar one before I held my breath and jumped in with both feet - I cannot possibly tell you the amount of time it's saved me.

    Just an example - a client wanted a series of very large flower prints to decorate a new barn conversion - I made up a smart album with 4* and above rated pictures with 'flower' in the keyword and created a web page:

    Flower Gallery

    The whole process took less than ten minutes and he ordered a number of prints directly from the page.

    If you're a 'real' pro, then shoots are going to be pretty much self-contained; a wedding is a good example, a PR shoot for a company is even better. It's going to be really easy to find the shots in a well organised file structure like Jack's.

    If you're an occasional seller of photos you are often going to get requests for a type of photo you've shot before - using something like Aperture really REALLY helps here - before you allow any of your organisation to go outside the Aperture DAM you should think very hard about whether you can accomplish it from inside.

    Another example - I have an ongoing project of photos of scarecrows - I have a smart album which has 'scarecrows' as a criteria - any new shots taken and keyworded will automatically end up in that album.

    For me, the original file structure needs to be logical in case of disaster, and because it's easier to organise backups . . . but after those RAW files have been copied to my photography drive, everything else is done from within Aperture - even if I'm shelling out to another program.

    Just this guy you know

  28. #28
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Jono I am with you if you decide to use an integrated solution (aperture,lightroom etc). But Jack s workflow is really "best of breed" . He may use a number of different raw convertors ..either by choice or because its required by the manufacturer. This necessitates a raw file (for full backup and the opportunity to reprocess as raw convertors improve) and a converted file . So it would seem that a logical folder/file structure would be maintained by OS x . The files once converted would then be imported (referenced) in A/L to have access to the DAM tools. Does your workflow provide for this? or are you converting in Aperature. IMHO the perfect solution would be to have a virtual stack for any image....raw,converted,maybe BW conversion,print 13x19 etc,share web,large web etc. Obviously not for every image but once created ....stored(or referenced) as a stack. I dont care if the folder structure has a print folder,web folder etc..because the view is managed by the DAM software. Roger

  29. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Just wanted to echo some of Jono's comments. Aperture will let you manage things pretty much to whatever your needs.

    As Jack does, I create a new folder from a shoot. I dump all the RAW images from that particular outing into that folder. I then rename those files, by simply adding a date prefix to them, retaining the original camera naming convention (e.g., _X5Dxxxx.cr2 for shots from my 1DsMkII, or _L100xxxx.dng from a Leica M8, etc.). So the new files become 072708_X5Dxxxx.cr2, as an example from a July 27, 2008 shoot. That name stays with all files, regardless of what I do with them. Any that get processed, get another letter added to the end (p for PS, a for Aperture, C for C1, etc.), and print files get a "size" associated also. So a file processed in PS to a 11x14 size for printing would become 072708_X5Dxxxxp11.psd, or if done also in C1 it would become 072708_X5Dxxxxc11.tif as an example. (I keep the size telegraphic...4 for 4x6, 5 for 5x7, 8 for 8x10, etc., or if odd sized, use that size, such as 8x12, 22x26, etc.) All of those files stay in the original folder with the RAW files, so they never get separated. The naming allows me to know which have been processed, and even by which method and to what printing size. All of those also get referenced in Aperture, so that they can be arranged in whatever folder or sorting structure I want. The utility here is that Aperture allows me to place things into whatever folder structure is convenient, such as Jono's "Scarecrows" smart folder, or whatever, but I can still go back to the the original folder to retrieve RAW or processed images to use any other way I want.

    The concept of stacks applies nicely here also. I can keep the RAW and any versions of that image in a single stack in Aperture, so I may have 3-4 sizes, B/W, Viveza, different crops, etc., all in the same stack. As long as you keep the links back to the originals intact, you can work on new versions of things in Aperture, saving them back to the Aperture Library, or exporting those versions out to whatever folder or place you want, including back to their original folder (recommended). That keeps all files and versions of things processed differently or sized for printing all in one place. So if you need to pull up a file, make a print, or create a Web gallery from something other than Aperture, for example, all of the files are easily accessible. With the coding, you can do simple searches on file type, or even wild card searches for specific processing or sizes if you wanted. Very flexible. Things stay managed in Aperture, but are completely organized in their original folder for access/use by other apps as needed.

    One of the main reasons I have kept this structure from the very start, was that I did use Bridge and ACR/PS for a ton of my event stuff, and still do. I can access the files from Bridge by simply pointing to the original folder, no matter where it is, or from C1 the same way. The use of ratings and color codes help in sorting there. I have been able to find files very quickly, and know how they have been handled just by the file name. Nothing ever gets lost or misplaced, and by having things referenced in Aperture, I am able to take advantage of all the DAM and other offerings, but still not lose my original file structure. If having separate special folders is needed, that can always be done, but I still keep things with the originals as much as possible. The only exception is for client prints from an event. I keep a separate Prints folder that has each client in a sub-folder and all print versions for each client get copied there. (I started this practice to allow easier access and retrieval or images for clients, and also to permit easier use with a RIP. The RIP opens the Prints folder and I just cruise down to the client name and select images for printing or reprinting.) That Prints folder can get pretty big, but it is an independent file of all prints made for all clients, kept mostly as a business disaster recovery tool, and stored on an external FW drive to be accessed by any computer as needed.

    It sounds complicated, but in reality, it is quite simple and very flexible.

    LJ

  30. #30
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    It's clear I need further work on my Aperture skills... I'm reviewing the tutorials yet another time and am in the process of batch changing the IPTC info on my projects. Pretty simple actually, but a bit time consuming if you haven't kept up to date. Jono, I like the concept of smart albums replacing subfolders but not sure I'm quite with you yet. Let's say I want to post an image here on the folder. I'll typically open Finder, navigate to my Develops folder and pick the jpg (rather than tiff) image inside it. Of course if I set up my folder structure to sort by file type I guess I don't need the Develops folder. With regard to the Selects subfolder, I'm with you 100% on the smart album solution. Much more elegant.

  31. #31
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    I think we're all singing from the same prayer sheet - i.e. keep all files outside Aperture/LR, but use it for all organisation.
    The only difference is the amount of outside work one does - I have sooo many converters:
    Bibble
    NX2
    Silkypix
    Capture 1
    ACR
    Lightroom
    Aperture
    (and that's just off the top of my head).
    But on the whole I've decided to use Aperture for everything I can, because my extra skill with it (from using it more often) more than outweighs the extra features in different converters under different circumstances (if you see what I mean). If the camera isn't supported . . . then I convert to DNG (I'm thinking of doing that for everything anyway).

    Of course, I do understand that I'm not a professional - I don't mess with RIP software for printing any more (again, I've got good at beating Aperture in to what I want - 2 is really very good for printing, and if it's bigger than A2 (22X17") then I get it done outside anyway).

    Just this guy you know

  32. #32
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Jack, do you have a specific file type that you always print from, i.e. jpeg, tiff, psd, or does it vary.
    I usually flatten my final print files and save them as 16-bit tiffs. I save my working CS files at native image size with all of their layers, and will usually use PSD/B and occasionally tiff -- I have no distinct preference for one over the other and use them interchangeably depending on the original file. I almost never print from a jpeg unless it is a small file or requested as such by the customer.
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  33. #33
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter FL/Atlanta GA
    Posts
    2,279
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    This is good stuff ...obviously I need to get my act together before I drown . Roger

  34. #34
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    This is good stuff ...obviously I need to get my act together before I drown . Roger
    I think this sort of thread is really useful

    Just this guy you know

  35. #35
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Jono, Roger, couldn't agree with you more. One of the truly great things about this forum is the way people are sharing their experience and knowledge. I've been on many forums but never found one with as much good information (and less bickering about "my stuff is better than your stuff"). Just a great place to hang out and learn.

  36. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    549
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    One question. I've been using aperture, and really like it a lot. I've imported all the photos into the Aperture library, and in hindsight feel like this is a mistake, simply because I'd feel happier to manage the directories myself. However, I see no practical reason for doing this. So my question is - especially to those who use aperture for most of their work - what are the practical benefits of keeping referenced files?

  37. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Well, for one thing, the Aperture Library will not be as large if you are only storing thumbnails and preview images for the referenced files, rather than storing the entire file also. This speeds up doing things in the application, especially if the image files being referenced are stored on another drive.

    The "downside" is that you do need to be connected to the referenced files if you want to print, export, etc., as the thumbnails and previews are just meant for viewing in Aperture, and possibly for creating Web pages.

    By having the original files stored in their own folders, it will allow you to access them by other applications. If you have everything stored in Aperture, it will be a bit harder to get at things, or you will have to export the master file. However, Aperture will let you shell out to other apps for doing things, such as to PS, etc., but it sends a TIFF or PSD file, unless you export the master and then pick that up from the other app. (In other words, if you have RAW files in Aperture, if you shell out to PS or something, it will use a processed file as a PSD or TIFF or JPEG, and not send the RAW file to be processed in some other application like C1. By leaving the RAW files outside of Aperture and just referencing them, that external folder structure lets you get at those files with other apps, should you need to.

    LJ

  38. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    549
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    OK. I've cleared this up with myself. The only benefits to have a ref. library are to save disk space, if you're on a laptop, or if you're using other programs for raw conversion.

    I Recently got 300 gigs for my macbook. This should last for a long time.

    Am I happy to use aperture as the sole raw converter? Yes

    So, there's no problem really.

    I guess what I was afraid of was being locked into aperture long term, because of the managed library. But apparently it's quite easy to go from managed to referenced if I ever choose to: File->Relocate masters for library

  39. #39
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by sizifo View Post
    OK. I've cleared this up with myself. The only benefits to have a ref. library are to save disk space, if you're on a laptop, or if you're using other programs for raw conversion.

    I Recently got 300 gigs for my macbook. This should last for a long time.

    Am I happy to use aperture as the sole raw converter? Yes

    So, there's no problem really.

    I guess what I was afraid of was being locked into aperture long term, because of the managed library. But apparently it's quite easy to go from managed to referenced if I ever choose to: File->Relocate masters for library
    Absolutely - I have referenced files because . . . . . . I'm a coward.
    I think you may be right - and if you use the 'vault' for backup, what is there to worry about.

    Just this guy you know

  40. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    549
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Absolutely - I have referenced files because . . . . . . I'm a coward.
    I think you may be right - and if you use the 'vault' for backup, what is there to worry about.
    There's one benefit right there - Time Machine vs. vault. Time machine is MUCH better, and it doesn't work with the managed library, at leas not in a very useful manner. For example, I tend to erase files permanently, and keep only the photos which I think are worth keeping. With a terabyte time machine disk, they could all be kept, in case of a change of heart.

    To be fair, the vault also keeps the stuff you erased in a special directory, but the time machine interface would be much more useful.

    If I was starting clean, I'd also keep all the files referenced, but don't think I can be bothered to rearrange, at least until a very long boring weekend comes along.

  41. #41
    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    10,486
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1031

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    When I used to use Lightroom (I don't any more), I kept it's reference libraries on a dedicated partition of a large disk, referencing the actual files across the multiple image database drives. The library files were not all that large so I had the library included in the Time Machine back up routine. Seemed to work fine, though I never actually needed to use it. But definitely a good strategy to consider for library back-ups IMO.
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  42. #42
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    When I used to use Lightroom (I don't any more), I kept it's reference libraries on a dedicated partition of a large disk, referencing the actual files across the multiple image database drives. The library files were not all that large so I had the library included in the Time Machine back up routine. Seemed to work fine, though I never actually needed to use it. But definitely a good strategy to consider for library back-ups IMO.
    Hi Jack
    I do the same with Aperture - the library (about 50gb) stays in the pictures folder on my hard drive - the images take up about 500Gb on an external drive.

    Both are backed up via time machine.

    This is fine, as it means that if I go on a week's trip, I can copy the library to the Pictures folder on my 17"MBP, and take the 1tb hard drive with me. On my return, I only need to copy the library back to the desktop and plug in the hard drive . . simple.

    Just this guy you know

  43. #43
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Am I missing something or is metadata entered in one program, say Aperture, not imported/recognized by another, say LR. If that's the case, it sure puts a lot more weight on deciding which program you're going to use.

  44. #44
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    jonoslack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    East Anglia & Cornwall (UK)
    Posts
    11,778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Am I missing something or is metadata entered in one program, say Aperture, not imported/recognized by another, say LR. If that's the case, it sure puts a lot more weight on deciding which program you're going to use.
    Hi David
    I'm pretty sure that there is a way of 'exporting' RAW projects from Aperture to include the metadata - but I don't think it's added by default.

    I think that it's a really big decision to make, and not one to go back on lightly.

    Just this guy you know

  45. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    There is an option to export metadata from Aperture, as Jono mentions. I have not tried doing this yet, so it may be worth experimenting.

    I have seen Aperture pick up metadata that I added from Bridge, but I have not looked for things going the other way.

    This is worth thinking about, as if you do a lot of keywording and such in Aperture, being able to retain that work with exported files for use in other apps is important.

    LJ

  46. #46
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Jupiter, Fla.
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Since none of us started with Aperture does this mean that all the years of entering keywords, captions, etc. that were done with other programs like Photo Mechanic are not searchable within Aperture. LJ, glad to hear Aperture has picked up metadata from Bridge.

  47. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Digital Asset Management

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Since none of us started with Aperture does this mean that all the years of entering keywords, captions, etc. that were done with other programs like Photo Mechanic are not searchable within Aperture. LJ, glad to hear Aperture has picked up metadata from Bridge.
    David,
    If I get a chance later, I will test some things. I think Aperture can pick up most of the metadata. Some of it may not be applicable, such as color coding from other apps, since it does not use color coding. (It may still hold the data, however, just not have a way to use it.)

    You can check this by going to an image, selecting the Metadata tab, choosing the IPTC -Expanded part, and then going to the the little "gear wheel" and selecting Edit Meta Data. That will bring up a list of all the meta data that can be displayed, and you can then select what you want included in the Aperture display. The list is quite long, and does include Keywords and other stuff, but did not see colors or ratings. Those may be in conflict with how Aperture uses that info itself. Really do no know, but at least you can get an idea of what can be used.

    LJ

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •