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907x 50c now available

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
How is everyone?
I am back from a photographic trip to the Kootenays in British Columbia. This time I was travelling with the Hasselblad 907X 50c and... I haven't had so much fun for a long time. It is a very unique camera, beautifully made and cleverly designed. I will be working on a full-fledged review, which should finds it way to the Medium Format Magazine.

©osztaba_907X_20201009_B0000437.jpg
907X 50c
XCD 35-75
 

Tim Floyd

New member
Olaf, I have wanted a back like this for a long time but I wonder how awkward is it to make portrait orientation photographs, either with the 907X or a 500/200 series camera. I hope your review will discuss this. Thanks!
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Olaf, I have wanted a back like this for a long time but I wonder how awkward is it to make portrait orientation photographs, either with the 907X or a 500/200 series camera. I hope your review will discuss this. Thanks!
I'm not Olaf, but with the 907x if I want to shoot full format I just turn the camera on its side. Not a big deal at all. Add the control grip if you do it a lot, makes it easy and fluid at the expense of compactness. Use an L-bracket with a tripod. It f using the back on the 500CM, I just crop to 39Mpixel square images most of the time since I prefer to use the WL finder or a magnifying finder. With this body, I generally shoot full format only horizontals since I sold off all my prism finders ages ago.

G
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
HASSELBLAD 907X 50c – Fresh from the field

I am working on a comprehensive review of the Hasselblad 907X 50c camera but I thought I would share with you my first, rather random, thoughts after shooting with this new system for the last five days.

The moment you take the camera out of the box, you know you are dealing with something different. It’s very small for medium format and its cube-like shape fits perfectly into your hand. It is a truly beautiful camera. The materials are of the highest quality. Every edge, button and surface makes me think of a collectible item rather than a typical photographic tool. Even the battery door is beautifully made with a quality H letter engraved on it. The way the door opens and closes is just genius, especially compared to the clumsy cheap battery doors in so many cameras nowadays. I have to say that from the industrial design perspective it is currently the most beautiful camera on the market. Many of you may not care about that but it matters to me.

The first lens I attached was the XCD 45p – a small but capable glass. This combo means the system is so small and light you can hold it comfortably in one hand. Then, there are the operations. The shutter button is located on the right bottom corner of the lens and it feels right on target when you hold the camera. In fact, you can operate the camera with one hand if you want to.

The operations are stripped to the bare minimum. The shutter button is wrapped in a scrolling wheel, which allows you to change the aperture. The LCD screen has five solid buttons along the lower edge of LCD – that’s all you have and all you need. The Hasselblad menu system is one of the most elegant, simple and photography-oriented on the market. It is the bare minimum for what you need for photography and I really enjoy it. Despite the emphasis on design, I could find everything I needed in the menu without looking at a manual. A simple thing such as formatting the card requires two steps without needing the menu. I wish other camera manufacturers would stop the frenzy of adding functions and buttons to their cameras. The spartan approach here is very refreshing.

For those who would like to add more functionality, the additional grip (beautifully matched to the camera) provides all the answers and more. My favourite is the focus point selector positioned on the upper part of the grip, which works beautifully. Interestingly enough even with the grip the camera feels light and playful. At the beginning I thought the separation of the grip from the camera by a metal attachment would feel strange but it’s quite the opposite. It feels so refreshing, reassuring and comfortable to hold (your hand can wrap around it, unlike the built-in grips).

How does it work in the field? I really enjoyed it. I noticed that I used the camera differently depending on whether I wanted to have the grip attached or not. It is so tempting to put on a small lens like the XCD 45p and play with the camera, using it in a straightforward and photographic-centred way. On the other hand, the grip adds functionality and allows you to shoot in a more traditional way.

One of the biggest surprises was the battery life. I was expecting to go through batteries very quickly but just two were enough for the entire day of shooting in the field.

In terms of the imagery, it has the same sensor as the X1D 50c II so the image quality is equally impressive and more than adequate for most people. For those who need more resolution and detail, Fujifilm GFX 100 or the Phase One system will take you there.

One of the revelations of this system is its compatibility and possible expansion, including all the range of lenses. I will write more about it in the upcoming review.

Yes, I am working on a comprehensive piece about this new system in which I will share more detailed information with you. I have to say I’m glad Hasselblad tapped into its rich heritage and came up with this product, which allowed them to differentiate themselves from the competition. They managed to create a camera that goes beyond being a dry photographic tool and taps into nostalgia, the fun factor and a feeling of photographic elation (actually not that easy to evoke). I like this new form so much that I will consider investing in the system myself.

Below please find a few images taken with the 907X 50c and the XCD 90mm, 45p and 35-75 lenses. Many more to come.

©osztaba_907X_20201009_B0000427-2.jpg©osztaba_907X_20201009_B0000428-2.jpg©osztaba_907X_20201009_B0000419-2.jpg©osztaba_907X_20201009_B0000464-2.jpg©osztaba_907X_20201009_B0000449-2.jpg
 

spb

Active member
Thanks Olaf, I look forward to the full review. If the pictures are anything to go by, I look forward to receiving my version of the 'cube' as I shall call it. Aesthetically they have created a gem of design.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Thanks Olaf! Have to say, for me this camera is a dream. The 907x used with the XCD lenses is just plain brilliant, the CFVII 50c back used with my much-loved old 500CMs and their lenses equally so. Through the use of lens adapters, the expansion of the 907x to use a wider range of lenses and lens accessories than I could possibly afford to buy new all over again enhances the value and preserves the utility of all the various equipment that I've acquired over many years.

The 907x is a landmark achievement for me. And yes, I love the little plaque on the side of the Special Edition which says "On the Moon since 1969" ... Some of the lenses I have used on it pre-date that event, so it has extra meaning! :D

G
 

spb

Active member
Yes I love the casual flip and catch of the camera.......:sneaky: won't find me doing that with mine even if it will be insured!
 

rdeloe

Active member
In the video Joe posted, Thomas Heaton says there's no live view histogram, but he thinks it might come in a future firmware upgrade. What have owner heard about that?
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
In the video Joe posted, Thomas Heaton says there's no live view histogram, but he thinks it might come in a future firmware upgrade. What have owner heard about that?
If you would like it, send a note to Hasselblad technical support. My understanding from my contact there is that engineering reads all such enhancement requests and bug reports and prioritizes what they'll work on based on what they see there, at least in part.

Not really. You don't have the correct viewing conditions with which to judge DoF on the camera LCD
I don't know why you say that. I can see the change in DoF on the LCD very clearly when I'm using a V system lens with the XV Adapter on a tripod and I stop the lens down to taking aperture after focusing. If I were out in the field, I'd need a focusing cloth or other shade to see the LCD clearly enough, but you can certainly see the DoF, and more clearly the closer the focus distance.

DoF Preview on demand is an available 907x option for the Control Grip with XCD (and maybe H system) lenses, but it isn't working yet. I filed a bug report and my contact said that it will be in a future firmware update. It is available already with adapted V system lenses (because in those lenses it's a part of the lens operation and independent of the body controls).

G
 

Shashin

Well-known member
I don't know why you say that. I can see the change in DoF on the LCD very clearly when I'm using a V system lens with the XV Adapter on a tripod and I stop the lens down to taking aperture after focusing. If I were out in the field, I'd need a focusing cloth or other shade to see the LCD clearly enough, but you can certainly see the DoF, and more clearly the closer the focus distance.

DoF Preview on demand is an available 907x option for the Control Grip with XCD (and maybe H system) lenses, but it isn't working yet. I filed a bug report and my contact said that it will be in a future firmware update. It is available already with adapted V system lenses (because in those lenses it's a part of the lens operation and independent of the body controls).

G
Yes, you will see the DoF change. But DoF is in relation to viewing conditions. If you make a print, are you going to maintain the same conditions? Probably not. So while you can see the change in DoF, the DoF will not be the same as in the displayed image. (BTW, cameras with a viewfinder have better conditions with which to evaluate the DoF in the image as the viewfinder sets up more typical conditions.)

If you want to judge DoF, I suggest taking the image and then evaluating it in playback.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Yes, you will see the DoF change. But DoF is in relation to viewing conditions. If you make a print, are you going to maintain the same conditions? Probably not. So while you can see the change in DoF, the DoF will not be the same as in the displayed image. (BTW, cameras with a viewfinder have better conditions with which to evaluate the DoF in the image as the viewfinder sets up more typical conditions.)

If you want to judge DoF, I suggest taking the image and then evaluating it in playback.
This seems to be in direct contradiction to the statements you made in the just prior, previous few sentences. Why would it be any different to see the DoF after the capture vs when you are setting up to make the capture?

Of course DoF is in relation to viewing conditions and a larger view creates a different viewing condition. But that doesn't mean that you cannot learn to previsualize a print's DoF by studying the DoF presented on the LCD or even in an EVF or SLR viewfinder. Or a ground glass on a view camera. People have been doing exactly this for coming up on two centuries now.

I can easily see and estimate what I consider to be the sweet spot with a DoF preview on my 907x when using an adapted Hasselblad V system lens or an adapted Leica M or R lens. A DoF Preview function will allow the same capability using an XCD lens, as soon as Hasselblad takes care of the bug I filed. :D

G
 

Hausen

Member
I agree totally on the nostalgia and design aspect of the 907x, it makes me happy everytime I take it out of the bag and being extremely kinesthetic I really enjoy just holding it. In use it is the perfect camera for my long exposure work.
 

tcdeveau

Active member
In the video Joe posted, Thomas Heaton says there's no live view histogram, but he thinks it might come in a future firmware upgrade. What have owner heard about that?
X-users have been asking HB for live view histogram for years. Hoping they get around to it at some point but it certainly doesn’t hurt to ping HB support and let them know it’s a feature you’d like.
 

Shashin

Well-known member
This seems to be in direct contradiction to the statements you made in the just prior, previous few sentences. Why would it be any different to see the DoF after the capture vs when you are setting up to make the capture?
I am not contradicting myself. I never said the effects of DoF cannot be perceived. I said you will not have the correct viewing conditions to judge DoF.

It will be better to judge DoF using playback in the field as you can magnify the image to better represent the size of the final image to judge sharpness.

Of course DoF is in relation to viewing conditions and a larger view creates a different viewing condition. But that doesn't mean that you cannot learn to previsualize a print's DoF by studying the DoF presented on the LCD or even in an EVF or SLR viewfinder. Or a ground glass on a view camera. People have been doing exactly this for coming up on two centuries now.
Certainly you can try to judge the DoF from the preview, but that is random and will depend on the person. I also suspect there will be confirmation bias in the process and so you will probably over estimate your ability--that is just how our minds work. The process has always been tricky--I have done it myself and the camera system and tools make a big difference. Looking at DoF on an 8x10 ground glass with a loupe is very different from judging it on a small LCD.

I can easily see and estimate what I consider to be the sweet spot with a DoF preview on my 907x when using an adapted Hasselblad V system lens or an adapted Leica M or R lens. A DoF Preview function will allow the same capability using an XCD lens, as soon as Hasselblad takes care of the bug I filed. :D

G
BTW, I was not arguing against the feature. I was just pointing out it is not that valuable. I am not sure if I would get upset because it was missing. I have always judge DoF from the playback image in my digital cameras. I have not found the DoF preview features that useful (in film it is different (unless I had Polaroids) because you really don't have the advantage of seeing that captured image).
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
...It will be better to judge DoF using playback in the field as you can magnify the image to better represent the size of the final image to judge sharpness.
...
BTW, I was not arguing against the feature. I was just pointing out it is not that valuable. I am not sure if I would get upset because it was missing. I have always judge DoF from the playback image in my digital cameras. I have not found the DoF preview features that useful (in film it is different (unless I had Polaroids) because you really don't have the advantage of seeing that captured image).
You can use focus magnification to enlarge the view during capture, and judge DoF from the magnified image the same as from post-capture review. There's no difference.

(bolded) The fact that I hadn't even realized that it was missing when I used the XCD lenses indicates just how much I find it affects me... :)
I'd been pre-visualizing DoF without any ability to display it on a screen for forty years before digital cameras existed.

G
 
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