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Anybody using a digicam to capture the aerial projected image at a LF cameras film-plane?

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
Hey, it's an idea. In theory, I could set up a 5x7 (or any LF format) with a legacy lens for a look I wanted, then mount a DSLR or Mirrorless with a macro lens at the rear to focus on the now "aerially projected" image at the view cams film plane that would normally expose film. I know you can focus a loupe on that aerial projection, so I assume it's possible to focus a camera on it. Obviously the resulting image will be inverted and mirrored and would need to be flipped and rotated in post, but I think this concept should work.

I'd have all of the view cam adjustment benefits but capturing the latent image digitally. I realize the camera set-up would be longer than a traditional film view cam as normally used with the digicam as a rear standard unit, but then I wouldn't be carrying a dark-cloth, film and holders or even a loupe or meter either. The ability to obtain a classic LF look without having to deal with film and chemistry definitely spaks interest in getting back into LF.

Thoughts?
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
I experimented with this concept years ago and found it mostly unworkable to rely purely upon the aerial image: getting the digital camera focused and capturing *just* the aerial image proved to be next to impossible with the equipment I had at hand then. What I found did to work reasonably well was to use a fine-ground glass (or fine-ground matte fresnel focusing glass!) at the focus plane and then use the digital camera to capture the image formed on that.

However, I never had a good enough setup (easy to set up correctly, sturdy enough to deal with typical handling...) that I could take out into the field and good digital cameras that could use PC type Nikon lenses appeared soon enough; I abandoned the endeavor.

G
 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
I experimented with this concept years ago and found it mostly unworkable to rely purely upon the aerial image: getting the digital camera focused and capturing *just* the aerial image proved to be next to impossible with the equipment I had at hand then. What I found did to work reasonably well was to use a fine-ground glass (or fine-ground matte fresnel focusing glass!) at the focus plane and then use the digital camera to capture the image formed on that.

However, I never had a good enough setup (easy to set up correctly, sturdy enough to deal with typical handling...) that I could take out into the field and good digital cameras that could use PC type Nikon lenses appeared soon enough; I abandoned the endeavor.

G
Interesting Godfrey -- I had wondered about that and figured it was "too much stuff" between the images. Certainly worth a try and might be a more easily workable solution.
 
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