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Apple M1, a revolution in the making?

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Read/Write speed comparison of the internal SSD of
1TB late 2013 Mac Pro: READ ~830 MB/s, WRITE ~830-980 MB/s
2TB 2020 M1 Mac mini
: READ ~2900 MB/s, WRITE ~2720-3020 MB/s
as recorded by Blackmagic Disk Speed Test.

Well, quite an improvement and noticeable in daily use! I like it! :cool:
That means that if a T3 connected SSD works at only half the nominal speed, it's still 50% faster than an internal SSD on a 2013 Pro.
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
Thanks Jorgen for the well reasoned educated guess.

By T3 you mean TB3 = Thunderbolt 3 or 4, right?
On a Mac TB3 and TB4 run both at 40 Gbit/s.
Apparently what’s different between the two is their protocol.
On a PC only TB4 is guaranteed at 40 Gbit/s or 5 GB/s max speed.

Jorgen, indeed your guess seems to be correct for M.2 storage media.
Some external SSDs actually are a bit faster than a mere 50%over a 2013 internal Macintosh SSD. (y)
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Thanks Jorgen for the well reasoned educated guess.

By T3 you mean TB3 = Thunderbolt 3 or 4, right?
On a Mac TB3 and TB4 run both at 40 Gbit/s.
Apparently what’s different between the two is their protocol.
On a PC only TB4 is guaranteed at 40 Gbit/s or 5 GB/s max speed.

Jorgen, indeed your guess seems to be correct for M.2 storage media.
Some external SSDs actually are a bit faster than a mere 50%over a 2013 internal Macintosh SSD. (y)
Yes, I mean TB3. No, I don't deal with Windows PCs, except the one my daughter uses to watch Harry Potter etc.

The transfer speed differences are becoming a bit confusing, USB 4 which only seems to exist in the minds of Apple's developers even more so, but they are a bit theoretical anyway, since there aren't any (correct me if I'm wrong) commercially available devices that can deliver 5 GB/s anyway. Even to reach 2.8 GB/s, I have a feeling that an external enclosure would have to be kept as "clean" as possible, with no SSD or HDD units that deliver lower speeds than the maximum aimed for. The relative slowness of a HDD would possibly have the potential of slowing the whole unit down just by being present, and certainly if it's involved in any processing.

What I would do is to have a separate enclosure for HDD units, and transfer material that I'm working on to an SSD at the faster unit.
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
Thanks Jorgen. Yup, also actual use transfer speeds can plummet greatly depending on the size of data files being transmitted and the block size chosen for a RAID, for example. Of course, the larger the file size transmitted the higher the transfer speeds.

IIRC I seem to have noticed, when copying with Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) my entire 25% filled internal drive to an external OWC Envoy Pro EX or FX SSD for backup, both read and write speeds for extended periods flattened out at slightly above 1 GB/s as if they hit a ceiling. CCC also generates its own overhead. Nevertheless, all data had to be moved twice, namely read from the internal and then written to the external drive for a combined transfer speed of well over 2 GB/s, as reads and writes are going on in parallel. Not bad, not bad at all.

Also for a RAID 0 of two 18TB Seagate IronWolfe hard drives in an OWC 8-bay TB3 enclosure, Blackmagic found read and write speeds of ~450-500 MB/s each. Incredible.
 
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k-hawinkler

Well-known member

Quote:”
"Percentage Used: Contains a vendor specific estimate of the percentage of NVM subsystem life used based on the actual usage and the manufacturer’s prediction of NVM life. A value of 100 indicates that the estimated endurance of the NVM in the NVM subsystem has been consumed, but may not indicate an NVM subsystem failure. The value is allowed to exceed 100. Percentages greater than 254 shall be represented as 255. This value shall be updated once per power-on hour (when the controller is not in a sleep state)." - SMART Attribute Details

This makes it clear what "Percentage Used" means.”

SMART Attribute Details
 
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