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CFV II 50C flash sync

antuk

New member
Hi all,

Has anyone with either the 907X SE or the standard 907X managed to connect it up to a wireless flash trigger with one cable? Im trying to avoid using the provided 3.5mm to PC sync and then connect the flash or the trigger to the "floating" PC sync cable

From what I can tell I would need a 3.5mm stereo (50C end) to 2.5mm/3.5mm mono for the flash/trigger - struggling to find stereo to mono cables though.

Wondering if anyone has got this to work and if so what cable you used

Thanks,
Anthony
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
All of my RF flash triggers have a standard hot shoe synch terminal on them, so I use a standard Nishin Hot Shoe Tripod mount fitted to the foot of the RF transmitter/transceiver along with the Hasselblad-provided 3.5mm stereo plug to female PC plug connection from CFVII 50c back for my connection. The Nishin tripod mount has the hot shoe on top and the bottom is a standard accessory shoe mount (with knurled locking ring) with a 1/4-20 threaded bolt hole drilled in the bottom, so I can fit it to any standard accessory shoe (on a bracket or whatever) or fit it onto a tripod with a PC-PC extension cable. I haven't used it more than a couple of times, but it works well.

G
 

nameBrandon

Active member
I'm not entirely clear what you're asking, so apologies if this is useless.. but I run the 3.5mm from CFV2 to PC-sync to my wireless transmitter (which has a pc-sync port). My receivers have both a hot-shoe as well as a PC-sync port, so when using my studio strobes I run another sync cable from the PC port on the receiver to the strobe (either 1/4" for my old White Lightnings, or 2.5mm for my Alien Bees). The rest of the lights are optical slaves to that light. If I were using speedlites I would just mount the speedlite in the hotshoe of the receiver.

FWIW, this is what I use, just leftover from my Canon days (it is TTL for Canon). I know they make a Nikon version that's TTL and I think Hasselblad is compatible with Nikon TTL.. so perhaps worth the investment if it has the connections you need.. only $85.

 
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antuk

New member
My receivers have both a hot-shoe as well as a PC-sync port, so when using my studio strobes I run another sync cable from the PC port on the receiver to the strobe (either 1/4" for my old White Lightnings, or 2.5mm for my Alien Bees). The rest of the lights are optical slaves to that light. If I were using speedlites I would just mount the speedlite in the hotshoe of the receiver.

FWIW, this is what I use, just leftover from my Canon days (it is TTL for Canon). I know they make a Nikon versi
Right ok maybe this is why my situ is more confused, neither of my wireless receivers or the lights have a pc sync port - the receivers have a 2.5mm jack and the lights have a 3.5mm jack.

So my current solution is 907X (3.5mm to PC sync socket) Triggers (2.5mm to PC sync port) with the two cables connecting together but the PC sync port to pc sync cable connection is very easy to come apart since its a flylead - was looking for a one cable solution. I guess if my triggers had a PC sync port then i wouldnt have this problem
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
Right ok maybe this is why my situ is more confused, neither of my wireless receivers or the lights have a pc sync port - the receivers have a 2.5mm jack and the lights have a 3.5mm jack.

So my current solution is 907X (3.5mm to PC sync socket) Triggers (2.5mm to PC sync port) with the two cables connecting together but the PC sync port to pc sync cable connection is very easy to come apart since its a flylead - was looking for a one cable solution. I guess if my triggers had a PC sync port then i wouldnt have this problem
I run into this problem whenever I have to use a PC to PC extension cord. The solution is a small rubber band or a bit of tape to securely hold the two connectors together ... I've never had a taped or rubber-banded connection come apart. :)
 
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antuk

New member
Thanks ill try that - annoyingly the included Exposure cable CW looks like the perfect cable for what i need, and has the right connectors on both end but its way too short to be of any sensible use and I can't find anywhere that sells a longer version
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
Thanks ill try that - annoyingly the included Exposure cable CW looks like the perfect cable for what i need, and has the right connectors on both end but its way too short to be of any sensible use and I can't find anywhere that sells a longer version
Perhaps you can find an extension cable for one or the other of the two plug ends, and then just tape that together so that it cannot come apart. I know I have a half dozen 3.5mm Stereo mini-jack extension cables like this somewhere in my mess (I can never find one when I want it, end up going down the street to buy another, then find the one I was looking for in the first place.... LOL! :D)

G
 
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spb

Active member
(I can never find one when I want it, end up going down the street to buy another, then find the one I was looking for in the first place.... LOL! :D)

G
Oh I know about that little issue!! LOL, then I have to break out in laughter.......
 

B L

Member
Godfrey, I dont own 907X or 50C but this discussion about using flash is interesting. Any precautions about trigger voltage?
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Godfrey, I dont own 907X or 50C but this discussion about using flash is interesting. Any precautions about trigger voltage?
I'm sure that a message sent to Hasselblad Customer Support asking "What is the maximum safe flash trigger voltage that the CFVII 50c back can handle?" would net a response from Hasselblad engineering. :)

I don't know anything specific about the Hasselblad 907x/CFVII 50c and don't see any flash trigger voltage specification in the spec sheet, but I would imagine that like with any other modern digital camera you should avoid putting huge voltage loads on the flash sync circuit. My RF flash triggers have a trigger voltage around 5V DC (I measured it long long ago). Some old electronic flash units without transistorized, isolated trigger circuits could have trigger voltages up to a couple hundred volts: I wouldn't risk $5000 worth of electronics with anything like that ...
 
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spb

Active member
I am trying to find out from a couple of sources this 'safe flash trigger voltage' for my Godox X2N trigger. Personally I don't know how to do that. I see nothing in the documentation. Nothing in reviews either.
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
I am trying to find out from a couple of sources this 'safe flash trigger voltage' for my Godox X2N trigger. Personally I don't know how to do that. I see nothing in the documentation. Nothing in reviews either.
Take a volt-ohm-meter set to the Volts-DC scale and, with the Good X2N transmitter powered on, connect it across the center and side terminals of the hot shoe foot (or to the center and side of its PC connection). The static voltage show is the trigger voltage level. I suspect that any modern trigger or flash unit will max out between 6 and 12 V DC.
 
Take a volt-ohm-meter set to the Volts-DC scale and, with the Good X2N transmitter powered on, connect it across the center and side terminals of the hot shoe foot (or to the center and side of its PC connection). The static voltage show is the trigger voltage level. I suspect that any modern trigger or flash unit will max out between 6 and 12 V DC.
You wouldn't measure the transmitter, but rather the center to side terminal of the flash's shoe in question for the actual trigger voltage. Most of the Godox, Yongnuo, etc. Chinese knockoff style triggers have a max of 12vdc at the shoe with a few capable of 24vdc. Pocketwizard (Flex) is usually around 50vdc max on the shoe with the cable ports (Flex P2/II/III/Max) safe up to around 200-300vdc.

The trigger source voltage always comes from the flash and the camera/trigger just "shorts" out the firing pin to ground. Most modern cameras and triggers use a semiconductor gate to trigger and V-lenses use a little gold plated contact pad. Too high of a voltage and it'll destroy the gate on semis, locking the device into a constant shorted state (or letting out the magic smoke). On the V lenses, people who had ridiculous HV flash systems (and a lot of older Speedotron packs) had too high of a voltage (some in the neighborhood of 50-300v), which would make the contacts arc and pit. The arc generates carbon tracking and the pitting removed layers of the (thin) plating, eventually causing the sync to fail.

Realistically, flash designers could simply make modern flashes that fire on < 1vdc. However, the lower the voltage, the more likeliness of failure to fire due to oxidation of the contacts. So a slightly higher voltage of around 3-6v is ideal to get around any oxide resistance.
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
You wouldn't measure the transmitter, but rather the center to side terminal of the flash's shoe in question for the actual trigger voltage. Most of the Godox, Yongnuo, etc. Chinese knockoff style triggers have a max of 12vdc at the shoe with a few capable of 24vdc. Pocketwizard (Flex) is usually around 50vdc max on the shoe with the cable ports (Flex P2/II/III/Max) safe up to around 200-300vdc.

The trigger source voltage always comes from the flash and the camera/trigger just "shorts" out the firing pin to ground. Most modern cameras and triggers use a semiconductor gate to trigger and V-lenses use a little gold plated contact pad. Too high of a voltage and it'll destroy the gate on semis, locking the device into a constant shorted state (or letting out the magic smoke). On the V lenses, people who had ridiculous HV flash systems (and a lot of older Speedotron packs) had too high of a voltage (some in the neighborhood of 50-300v), which would make the contacts arc and pit. The arc generates carbon tracking and the pitting removed layers of the (thin) plating, eventually causing the sync to fail.

Realistically, flash designers could simply make modern flashes that fire on < 1vdc. However, the lower the voltage, the more likeliness of failure to fire due to oxidation of the contacts. So a slightly higher voltage of around 3-6v is ideal to get around any oxide resistance.
Hmm. But if you're using a Godox X2N wireless transmitter, the flash isn't attached to the camera but to the Godox receiver, therefore the flash's trigger voltage is completely isolated from the camera...? The transmitter has to supply trigger power for it to be tripped and send the signal to the flash. (Looking at these units on-line, I believe they are transceivers with a transmit mode and a receive mode. You connect one to the camera and up to five others to flash units to fire when the transmitter sends the signal...

Please correct me if I have that wrong, I just don't see how it could work any other way as a wireless trigger system.
 

spb

Active member
With the Godox XPRO N, which doesn't have a hot-shoe on top, AD200 and all other Godox 2.4 enabled wireless flash works perfectly with the X1D II.
As I understand it the X2N is a Transmitter, the flash range from Godox are all receivers (built-in). There should be no problem for these to work with the 907 either albeit connected through the Flash Out terminal, my concern is whether or not the signal sent between 907 and X2N is within the tolerated flash trigger voltage range or even whether or not connected by cable has any danger of too high voltage.
 
Hmm. But if you're using a Godox X2N wireless transmitter, the flash isn't attached to the camera but to the Godox receiver, therefore the flash's trigger voltage is completely isolated from the camera...? The transmitter has to supply trigger power for it to be tripped and send the signal to the flash. (Looking at these units on-line, I believe they are transceivers with a transmit mode and a receive mode. You connect one to the camera and up to five others to flash units to fire when the transmitter sends the signal...

Please correct me if I have that wrong, I just don't see how it could work any other way as a wireless trigger system.
It doesn't matter if it's a flash, a passthrough, or just a wireless trigger. It's based on the shoe terminal/input terminal looking for a short (low resistance) in order to trigger. Yes, there's going to be some current passing, but it's miniscule. Any voltage is going to be very, very low.
 
With the Godox XPRO N, which doesn't have a hot-shoe on top, AD200 and all other Godox 2.4 enabled wireless flash works perfectly with the X1D II.
As I understand it the X2N is a Transmitter, the flash range from Godox are all receivers (built-in). There should be no problem for these to work with the 907 either albeit connected through the Flash Out terminal, my concern is whether or not the signal sent between 907 and X2N is within the tolerated flash trigger voltage range or even whether or not connected by cable has any danger of too high voltage.
Both are modern devices, so they'll be fine together. There's miniscule voltage being output as it's more of a resistance trigger nowadays than the old voltage vs closed circuit setup of HV packs.
 
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spb

Active member
Heh Doc thank you for the detailed info. That puts my mind at rest on this subject.
 
Heh Doc thank you for the detailed info. That puts my mind at rest on this subject.
Pretty much any modern day, battery operated trigger is always safe. Most modern day flashes are (there are some Nissins that can get fairly "high", close to 12v). If you were to connect any studio strobes directly, then I'd be more weary, even for the newest models as they can be low voltage, yet "unsafe". If you were firing old hammerhead flashes, old Vivitar 28x, or stuff like that, I'd be very weary. I've seen some of those even toast SafeSync isolators when they get old and stuff like ground wires inside break from being brittle. I've seen an old Speedo brownline short out internally, shoot sparks, and send the high voltage burst up a sync line...the 150CF had smoke coming out of the lens from the sync contacts burning.

Pocketwizard has the highest sync voltage handling and nowadays it's best to fire via a wireless trigger almost anytime nowadays as it's cheaper to blow up a trigger than camera board. The only time you'd really need/want to fire via direct wire is if you needed extremely high sync speeds (1/2000+) or high burst rates. But then again, if you needed those, you'd be shooting something like a Scoro S pack with the dedicated Bron trigger which can handle those rates (and if you are affording those, you ain't gonna use Godox stuff...)
 

spb

Active member
Not directly on camera. I have from previous setup 2 Godox AD200 which are triggered upto now by a Godox XPRO-N and two TT350N all which I had when I had Leica and Fuji gear.

I am buying a Godox X2N to trigger via Flash Output cable on 907. A TT350N can then sit on the X2N aboard a flash bracket.
 
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