The GetDPI Photography Forum

Great to see you here. Join our insightful photographic forum today and start tapping into a huge wealth of photographic knowledge. Completing our simple registration process will allow you to gain access to exclusive content, add your own topics and posts, share your work and connect with other members through your own private inbox! And don’t forget to say hi!

CFV II 50C flash sync

Heh Doc thank you for the detailed info. That puts my mind at rest on this subject.
Sorry, I just re-read my post and I didn't mean for that last line to sound like I was callin' ya cheap or poor... I meant that people who already spent $20K+ on their strobe won't go try and save a few dollars to get a third-party trigger when they would just get the matching OEM. Those people are either sponsored or have enough work that their lighting pays for itself in a few jobs usually. The rest of us just gotta wait until their packs get used heavily and we buy them beat up...

The Bron stuff is nice though in that it's all matched and you can use a computer/tablet to control your lighting setup between multiple packs/heads/monos from one location, save the setup, and reload it at will. I think Profoto has the same concepts too.
 
  • Thanks
Reactions: spb
Not directly on camera. I have from previous setup 2 Godox AD200 which are triggered upto now by a Godox XPRO-N and two TT350N all which I had when I had Leica and Fuji gear.

I am buying a Godox X2N to trigger via Flash Output cable on 907. A TT350N can then sit on the X2N aboard a flash bracket.
You should be fine with that setup...stop worrying and go shoot the gear!
 
  • Like
Reactions: spb

spb

Active member
Sorry, I just re-read my post and I didn't mean for that last line to sound like I was callin' ya cheap or poor... I meant that people who already spent $20K+ on their strobe won't go try and save a few dollars to get a third-party trigger when they would just get the matching OEM. Those people are either sponsored or have enough work that their lighting pays for itself in a few jobs usually. The rest of us just gotta wait until their packs get used heavily and we buy them beat up...

The Bron stuff is nice though in that it's all matched and you can use a computer/tablet to control your lighting setup between multiple packs/heads/monos from one location, save the setup, and reload it at will. I think Profoto has the same concepts too.
No problem that is how I took it.

Bron stuff is very nice - but you do need work of some sort to help pay for it. I also come in the 'rest of us' bracket.
 
No problem that is how I took it.

Bron stuff is very nice - but you do need work of some sort to help pay for it. I also come in the 'rest of us' bracket.
I use a bunch of Bron lights in the studio, all packs though. And none were bought new, all well beat up and I've repaired them all. I'm not much into monolighting, TTL, or small flashes. I currently have 4x 2400ws packs set up for a product shoot. I also like the Bowens (actual, not knockoff) packs especially the QuadX/Creo stuff. It does get a bit hair raising at times when all the heads need fired near full power. A dozen heads with the *POP* that comes along with the nice ozone smell can be unsettling. With Pocketwizards firing across the whole line, I'm not as worried as if I was wired, but the first time that fires in a quiet studio...yikes.

And even with Bron/profoto, the really old stuff had some nasty sync voltages, which was the norm for the day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: spb
"as if I was wired" - just imagine all those lovely cables to trip up over..........
I did that in the early days of Pocketwizard when they were expensive. Using 1 Pocketwizard MAX (the original, not the MultiMax) to a PC distributor, which was a 1-PC sync to 6-port outlet. The distributor usually sat under the shooting table or behind the backdrop with wires spidering out all over to the different packs. 50ft and 100ft PC cables were common (and so were those stupid air-bulb shutter cable releases). I shot Norman then, so I had all these little 2-head 2000w/s packs everywhere. A LOT of gaff tape was used to "safe" cables in those days!
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
It doesn't matter if it's a flash, a passthrough, or just a wireless trigger. It's based on the shoe terminal/input terminal looking for a short (low resistance) in order to trigger. Yes, there's going to be some current passing, but it's miniscule. Any voltage is going to be very, very low.
So you didn't actually respond to my query but you confirmed what I thought: It's the "trigger voltage" of the transmitter that counts, not the trigger voltage of the flash unit, in the case of a wireless transmitter/flash setup. And yes, I agree—any modern equipment with transistorized trigger circuitry is going to be low voltage and safe, the old HV studio flash packs of the 1970s with 200-400V popping across a mechanical switching circuit should be a thing of the past.

If, however, you still have a couple of those old HV flash packs poking about that you want to use, for use with any modern camera like the Hasselblad 907x/CFVII 50c, you should put a "safe sync" unit in the circuit if you're connecting directly to the camera's sync terminal, something like the "Speedotron Safe Sync Hot Shoe Adapter" from B&H, which provides the isolation from HV needed to keep the circuitry in the camera safe.

G
 
So you didn't actually respond to my query but you confirmed what I thought: It's the "trigger voltage" of the transmitter that counts, not the trigger voltage of the flash unit, in the case of a wireless transmitter/flash setup. And yes, I agree—any modern equipment with transistorized trigger circuitry is going to be low voltage and safe, the old HV studio flash packs of the 1970s with 200-400V popping across a mechanical switching circuit should be a thing of the past.

If, however, you still have a couple of those old HV flash packs poking about that you want to use, for use with any modern camera like the Hasselblad 907x/CFVII 50c, you should put a "safe sync" unit in the circuit if you're connecting directly to the camera's sync terminal, something like the "Speedotron Safe Sync Hot Shoe Adapter" from B&H, which provides the isolation from HV needed to keep the circuitry in the camera safe.

G
I did respond to your query... the pertinent value is the measurement of the *highest* voltage item in the stack. If you have an X2N, Flex TT5, or equivalent by itself, then it would be the only one that matters. Since they are battery powered, they are going to be low voltage with very little current, probably never more than the voltage of the battery powering it. It's also the case of the PW Plus III, where the trigger is the only item with no external shoe. In this case, it's [email protected] or so. Both voltage and current matter. That same 2.9V at 3A can cause quite a spark on mechanical syncs.

However, if you put a flash on the transmitter, then you should pay attention to the flash's sync voltage as it may be higher. If it's too high, it can short out the wireless trigger device and/or arc. Not too many devices are designed with discrete bipolar transistors anymore. Most are gated semis of some kind or another, but in a much smaller chip SMT format. That makes it much more likely to arc. If there were straight SCR/triac/bipolars still being used and they took a large voltage or high current, they'd just burn out or pop. With the smaller SMT or SOIC packaged designs, they can arc the device into a shorted state rather than open. It happens in power supplies a lot where older designs would just quit working, but newer ones get hot, melt, catch fire, or surge out the load. With older devices, you'd find pieces of the semis inside the casing. With newer designs, you'll see scorch marks, arc marks, or lots of magic smoke inside the case.

The other issue is if the highest voltage exceeds the lowest in the stack and/or has a very high current. Any arc it starts can forcefully burn with more current. Once it starts, it's harder to self-quench. Mechanical syncs are more tolerant of this as they will pit the coating slowly until they stop conducting which could be years. With modern, solid state syncs, they are much more delicate since one surge exceeding the device can cause it to blow.

When I shot the Flex system or played around with the cheap Yongnuo system, I often had flashes on the remote transceiver as a receiver. BUT, I usually also had a flash on top of the unit on camera too. That's the one that matters. If the voltage on the remote flashes exceeded the max of the receivers, then it would just blow that unit. But if the one on camera did the same, it could very likely go straight through to the camera's shoe so it is the important one to watch. These were all 580EXIIs so they were fine, other than the interference issue with PW. So glad to have gotten rid of those nowadays with the 600EXRT-II system.
 
Top