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D780 - living in the past?

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
I don't know the source of this generalisation but these points are the least important for me. I did change part of my kit to mirrorless for the short flange distance allowing to adapt many different lenses and the possibility of a magnified view through the viewfinder. The reduced weight/size is only a benefit if you choose the right bodies and lenses (as your table shows) :lecture:
I see the weight claim often from people who have changed or consider changing, as well as in marketing of mirrorless cameras. However, many will deny it when confronted with the facts, either the facts or the reason for changing. The only roads to lighter gear are smaller sensors and/or smaller apertures. Mirrorless does have an advantage when using smaller sensors though; the fact that the size of the viewfinder is independent of the sensor size.

The adapted lens thing is only valid for a small group of enthusiasts. Most people use native lenses for the system they've bought into. Most don't even know that they can adapt lenses, lenses with full functionality, like F-mount lenses on Nikon mirrorless included. I've had that discussion wiyth converts a few times lately.

There is of course a size advantage with mirrorless, since the shape of the camera isn't dictated by the mirror box, and I understand that many like the "always bright" viewfinder. Me? My liking for the original way of looking through a viewfinder, using optics rather than electronics, is gaining strength though. I don't care if the EVFs will probably be as good as OVFs in 5 years or 10 years or 20. If they are, fine, but in the meantime, I'll enjoy mirrors and lenses and cameras that say click clack.
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
But when all that is said, I think Nikon has done a fantastic job with the Z Series, and they are easily the full frame mirrorless that suit me the best. Nice, compact size, but still with great ergonomics.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
I think OVF's and EVF's will never be the same but they each have their strength and have some aspects that can't be replicated by the other. So choose what suits you best or choose both so you can use each to their strength.

And the Nikon Z series are fine cameras but ergonomically I've never held a Nikon I really liked including these mirrorless models, but ergonomics is also a very personal aspect that's more than just big hands or small hands. Making statements about good or bad ergonomics "in general" always sound a bit silly to me.
 

iiiNelson

Active member
Can’t help but think this should’ve been the Z6II... Seems like a capable camera that has many of the features that many expected in the original Z6/7 lines.
 
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Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Can help but think this should’ve been the Z6II... Seems like a capable camera that has many of the features that many expected in the original Z6/7 lines.
Nah... they didn't have the tools available to drill a hole for the OVF on the Z6 :ROTFL:

Here's a useful walkthrough of the features. This will become a very much liked camera. Looks like an almost perfect upgrade of the D750 to me.

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/0982367212/hands-on-with-the-nikon-d780
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Here's someone who really likes it, and he points out one thing that I agree with: shooting a long day, like 8-10 hours and several thousand photos, my eyes get tired from looking into an EVF but not so much using an OVF. Apart from that, he mentions an almost 70 shot RAW buffer and a few other things:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO2EX1UOyhU
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Great camera... :) not so much the dp video review above. Technically and scene-wise, it was very good.

I made the mistake of waking up early and watched it before I was entirely awake. The video made me feel like I was on a caffeine high after a gallon of coffee! Presentation was too much for me as I prefer simply to read the reviews and not watch a nervous presentation. Now I will skip my own coffee for breakfast and find something to calm me down. :ROTFL:

Silence is golden!:)
 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
I did not read it all thoroughly, but my takeaway is that it's a Z6 with native F mount and no IBIS... Seems to me, with the FTZ adapter on the Z6, you get identical features plus IBIS, plus the ability to utilize Z lenses should you want them later. Am I missing something?
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
The OVF

But it's up to the individual user if he "misses" this or not ;)
Yes, obviously the OVF, which would be the most important feature for me. Then much longer battery life and lastly the ability to AF with older AF lenses.

However, for my current use, I could as well buy a new F6 at a similar price which in my view is unsurpassed when it comes pure "joy of photography", and use mirrorless when I need digital. I had the F6 for a few years, and it's the camera I miss the most of those I've sold, particularly since I shoot film more and more for personal enjoyment.
 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
Jorgen, just curious if you’ve played at all with Z evf? I ask because initially I was skeptical, but after about a week, I realized the benefits of magnified focus peaking and “real exposure” views were more advantageous , more wysiwyg, for my uses than traditional ovf.
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Jorgen, just curious if you’ve played at all with Z evf? I ask because initially I was skeptical, but after about a week, I realized the benefits of magnified focus peaking and “real exposure” views were more advantageous , more wysiwyg, for my uses than traditional ovf.
I hear you Jack, I hear you. Only very briefly so far. It's on my list, but my regular shop doesn't stock them for the time being, and I would need more than the five minutes that I would be allowed in most shops in this country.
 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
I hear you Jack, I hear you. Only very briefly so far. It's on my list, but my regular shop doesn't stock them for the time being, and I would need more than the five minutes that I would be allowed in most shops in this country.
I do understand...

My point is, there is a ----let me call it freedom for lack of a better term---- to composition with the WYSIWYG display. If I'm shooting in B&W mode, I see the image in the evf in B&W. If I shoot in color at night, the image in the evf is normalized, previewing the actual lighting I'm about to capture. If I shoot manually, the display darkens and lightens appropriately as I adjust my exposure. At first, I didn't like those aspects -- or thought I didn't, simply because it wasn't what I was used to. After a week, I saw it for the rather significant advantages it offers. YMMV :)
 
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