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Fun with MF images

docholliday

Active member
While I totally agree that a thorough understanding of the geometry is helpful (to avoid large confusing errors, mostly), when it comes down to setting the tilt in the field, one either has to use an app, a calculator, a rule of thumb, or very good eyesight. Computing (180/Pi)*ArcTan(focal length/height) is not my idea of fun. Ok, it IS my idea of fun, but I'm weird. BTW, it's 30 mm=1 degree for 5 1/2 feet. My memory was off. Since the formula is very close to linear in MOST landscape uses (not product photography!), I'm happy with the approximation.

Also, as noted above, f/22 is your friend.

Matt

BTW, laser pointers mounted vertically parallel to the sensor plane and lens plane would be helpful. Tilt until the spots line up. Someone should market it...

And does anyone know a simple proof of Scheimpflug? I'm a geometer - I'll give it a try...
Yes, I definitely agree that a lot of it is overkill for hobbyists. But, there's quite a few who I feel can do better than some working pros. I had a landscape shot with model that was especially difficult. There was a hill/cliff on the right that had one model halfway up with another model on the flat ground. So, part landscape, part editorial with a heavy breeze blowing through the narrow passage. There was also some nasty swamp-like crap to the opposite side of the frame and the time-window was very narrow. The icing on that cake was that strobes were mixed, so apertures had to be fairly wide.

Ended up shooting it with all kinds of crazy movements around f5.6 on sheet film. It was definitely the most memorable shoot I've had where I had to do all kinds of drawing and calculations to get it in the can.

I had a "bore sight" style filter I made which screwed onto the front of the lens and projected the beam along the image path. It was milled brass with a smaller laser diode and optics inserted into a center well, then collimated. I haven't used it in years, but it doubled as a focus aid for long distances in the dark!
 

nameBrandon

Active member
Another one from this morning on Lake Michigan. Lesson learned on driftwood.. I should probably do two exposures, one for the driftwood without any movement due to the water / tide, and then a long exposure for the actual water itself. The front part of this driftwood has a fair amount of motion blur. I still liked how it turned out though.

 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Scheimpflug - We'll keep the lens plane fixed. The best I can do is the 2-dimensional case, where (x,y) -> -a*(x,y), and (1/x) + 1/(a*x) = (1/f). (1/a is the magnification) Plug in y = m*x+b (the film plane) and you get a mess of the form (x1, m1*x1 + b). The intercept stays constant, and so the in-focus plane and the film plane pass through the same point on the lens plane. I wish I had something more concrete, but the calculation isn't very hard.

Yes, I had Mathematica do the heavy lifting, but x1 = f*x/(f+x) and m1 = m-(b/f). If you're worried about signs, remember that x is negative, and more negative than f is positive! And b is large, so m1 and m have opposite signs, as they should.

I'll think about lenses in 3D, but really, I think I'm the only one who cares to derive this stuff from scratch.

:OT:? Is this :OT:? Yep...

Matt
 
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docholliday

Active member
Scheimpflug - We'll keep the lens plane fixed. The best I can do is the 2-dimensional case, where (x,y) -> -a*(x,y), and (1/x) + 1/(a*x) = (1/f). (1/a is the magnification) Plug in y = m*x+b (the film plane) and you get a mess of the form (x1, m1*x1 + b). The intercept stays constant, and so the in-focus plane and the film plane pass through the same point on the lens plane. I wish I had something more concrete, but the calculation isn't very hard.

Yes, I had Mathematica do all the calculation, but x1 = f*x/(f+x) and m1 = m-(b/f). If you're worried about signs, remember that x is negative, and more negative than f is positive! And b is large, so m1 and m have opposite signs, as they should.

I'll think about lenses in 3D, but really, I think I'm the only one who cares to derive this stuff from scratch.

:OT:? Is this :OT:? Yep...

Matt
You're not the only one...:D

I believe that a full understanding of the tools make for better results. Hence, why I believe that the more intimately involved with the technicalities and design, the more effectively the tools can be used and the limits maximized. It's not about the sharpest, most contrasty, most CA-lacking lenses or the richest color sensor to me. I pick the tool, even if it's an old "nasty" lens, that'll get the job done quickest and easiest. And the only way to do that is to understand what the origins and boundries are!
 

AlanS

Well-known member
River Wear.
Stacked from 6 images (and some fudging)....
(Note, no tilt was used at any time in the making of this image)! :ROTFL:



 

dave.gt

Well-known member
My eyes glazed over at "Is your horizon level?"

Joe
Where is the FUN in perfection?:ROTFL:

Nothing in my life has ever been perfect, and I doubt it is ever going to happen, right? While I appreciate the journey toward excellence, I will simply admire those who post with such detailed work! All the hard work is rarely appreciated by others.:salute:

I just finished some research on an amazing gentleman who had cerebral palsy and in spite of that, he produced a lifetime of amazing portraits, landscapes and countless other works of art with a typewriter!!! Amazing!!!:thumbup:

https://www.cerebralpalsy.org/inspiration/artists/paul-smith

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=svzPm8lT36o

But in reality, as a friend recently mentioned, that such excellent work only confirms how average I am. And that is ok. It doesn't inspire me to follow the same path at all... I am incapable of that! It does, however, inspire me that the human spirit will eventually allow for expression of art through whatever medium works for each individual. I look forward to more masterful images in this thread!

(Unfortunately, I have no such/any talent.:banghead: So, I continue on with my own self-expression and I am quite happy with it. This is a "Fun" with MF thread, so maybe I will be allowed to continue enjoying others' remarkable work posted here.:))

Thanks to all!:):):)
 
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mristuccia

Active member
Finally today I've found the time to walk a little bit around Berlin with my Hasselblad 503CW + CFV-50c handheld.
Not the easiest way to do some street photography, but I had a lot of fun!

Despite the coronavirus people were cool and relaxed. :)

Handheld with the 80mm.

20200823_BERLIN_Around_02_FramedMetadata.jpg

Another one from the same place.

20200823_BERLIN_Around_01_FramedMetadata.jpg

Thank you for looking.
 

Mexecutioner

Active member
Continuing this series of my wife's garden produce. Today we chose 2 Jalapeño peppers that she pulled from the vine to incorporate to some salsa verde I made for breakfast. I also had an immature oro blanco grapefruit that some critter pulled off the tree and left on the ground so I added that one to the mix. Interesting to see how thick the peel is at this stage. Those grapefruits still need 3 or 4 months to be ready.


My Lovers Garden0504 MASTER copy.jpg
 
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jotloob

Subscriber Member
Finally today I've found the time to walk a little bit around Berlin with my Hasselblad 503CW + CFV-50c handheld.
Not the easiest way to do some street photography, but I had a lot of fun!

Despite the coronavirus people were cool and relaxed. :)

Handheld with the 80mm.

View attachment 151049

Another one from the same place.

View attachment 151048

Thank you for looking.
Hello Marco

I love number two .:thumbs: But tell me , has autumn already arrived in Berlin ? ? ?
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Finally today I've found the time to walk a little bit around Berlin with my Hasselblad 503CW + CFV-50c handheld.
Not the easiest way to do some street photography, but I had a lot of fun!

Despite the coronavirus people were cool and relaxed. :)

Handheld with the 80mm.

View attachment 151049

Another one from the same place.

View attachment 151048

Thank you for looking.
Marco, love them both! Color and composition are wonderful, thanks for sharing!:thumbs:
 

nameBrandon

Active member
This is why I got into the habit of bringing the cfv2/45p with me everywhere.. this was just sitting in the grocery store parking lot.

1960, I believe.

 

mristuccia

Active member
Hello Marco

I love number two .:thumbs: But tell me , has autumn already arrived in Berlin ? ? ?
Thank you very much Jürgen!
Well, most of the trees around the one I've photographed are still green, maybe it is anticipating the fall...
In any case, since I moved to Berlin from Italy I was told that in Germany summer ends in mid August. Thus you can understand my drama, coming from Sicily where autumn only starts in late October. :D
 
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vieri

Well-known member
Another one from this morning on Lake Michigan. Lesson learned on driftwood.. I should probably do two exposures, one for the driftwood without any movement due to the water / tide, and then a long exposure for the actual water itself. The front part of this driftwood has a fair amount of motion blur. I still liked how it turned out though.

Hey Brandon, loved this :) For what is worth, here's my .02 about doing two exposures to have the driftwood perfectly sharp and non-blurred. While I respect everyone's artistic vision and taste, personally I really don't like those photos with boats perfectly sharp pasted on a total blurred sea, and the like. For some reason they look fake to me in a not-too-pleasant way, and I am not really known to be a stickler for realistic imagery in general :ROTFL: Maybe this is because I know as a photographer myself that some blur has to be expected when shooting a boat with a very long exposure (?). Driftwood of course is a different situation, since it might be stuck to the bottom of the water, be it a river / lake or the like, and therefore not apparently moving, and in this case I see your point in wanting it to be free of blur - to me, if it looks sharp enough to be clear, like in your image here (or so unsharp as to be totally abstract), then it's fine. In the end, I believe that what counts is whether the resulting image looks beautiful and make sense to you, first and foremost, and to your viewers (or at least a good part of them). :)

Best regards,

Vieri
 
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