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Fun with S1/s1r

ptomsu

Workshop Member
Thanks Tom!

Colours are really great IMO, and that 90-280 shines, but actually also the kit lens :thumbs:
 
M

mjr

Guest
Paratom

What are your first impressions of using it? Good solid feel and easy to get to grips with? It's an interesting camera for sure.

Mat
 

Paratom

Active member
Paratom

What are your first impressions of using it? Good solid feel and easy to get to grips with? It's an interesting camera for sure.

Mat
First time I saw it and hold it in hand I thought that its too thick and the grip is too large (for my hands) and left the store without buying. After further consideration (because I own SL lenses) I went back to the store with more time and also the SL to compare and decided to give it a try. After using it some days I actually dont find it too fat any more. It sits very good in my hand. Also most buttons are very good to access. It takes some time to figure out all the functions but overall most buttons are labeled and easy to use. The AF offers more functions and better people/face detection over the SL. The shutter is well damped. After some days and setting the camera up to my taste I allready feel at home and its really fast and good to use. IQ looks good to me so far as well. I havent done any high ISO test - I have shot it mainly in good light and low ISO so far. SO far I enjoy it - and I dont think it is just the "new toy"-factor.
 
M

mjr

Guest
Thanks for your thoughts, I may pick one up next week and have a play around, it's the first mirrorless full frame that has interested me from a size/build point of view. I hope you enjoy using it.

Mat
 

Paratom

Active member
Thanks for your thoughts, I may pick one up next week and have a play around, it's the first mirrorless full frame that has interested me from a size/build point of view. I hope you enjoy using it.

Mat
I certainly like it so far but user interface. Looking forward to hear your impressions.
Tom
 

gerald.d

Active member
Ok, here we go....



Will be a while before I get everything sorted out, but at least the physical side of the challenge has been completed :)

Kind regards,


Gerald.
 

gerald.d

Active member
Wow, what is it ?
The camera is a CAPcam - a computerised view camera. Details here -

https://www.capcam.org/

In normal use, the camera is designed to be used with Medium Format Digital Backs.

I had an adapter plate manufactured that has a Mamiya 645 lens mount on it - this allows me through the use of lens adapters to mount all sorts of cameras on the back of the CAPcam to use their sensors and shutters in place of my Phase One back. The initial drive for doing this was so that I could start shooting video, but with the release of the S1R, I realised that maybe I could replace the Phase One for stills as well.

Currently it's very much a work in progress set-up (just started playing with it all this morning). The CAPcam software cannot read the RAW from the Panasonic, and whilst it should be able to read a JPEG, it's not working. They are looking into this for me.

So what I have to do at the moment (if I want to set tilt and swing) is a little bizarre - I set everything up using a Sony A7III (whose files the software can read), then take that off the CAPcam and attach the Panasonic.

Kind regards,


Gerald.
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
The camera is a CAPcam - a computerised view camera. Details here -

https://www.capcam.org/

In normal use, the camera is designed to be used with Medium Format Digital Backs.

I had an adapter plate manufactured that has a Mamiya 645 lens mount on it - this allows me through the use of lens adapters to mount all sorts of cameras on the back of the CAPcam to use their sensors and shutters in place of my Phase One back. The initial drive for doing this was so that I could start shooting video, but with the release of the S1R, I realised that maybe I could replace the Phase One for stills as well.

Currently it's very much a work in progress set-up (just started playing with it all this morning). The CAPcam software cannot read the RAW from the Panasonic, and whilst it should be able to read a JPEG, it's not working. They are looking into this for me.

So what I have to do at the moment (if I want to set tilt and swing) is a little bizarre - I set everything up using a Sony A7III (whose files the software can read), then take that off the CAPcam and attach the Panasonic.

Kind regards,


Gerald.
Very interesting. What are the black rods sticking out at the back? Rays of death? Strobes?
 

JoelM

Member
Very interesting. What are the black rods sticking out at the back? Rays of death? Strobes?
I believe that in the original design, they were indeed, "rays of death". However, after many meetings, the committee decided to go the other direction as Gerald has indicated. :eek:

Joel
 

pegelli

Well-known member
The camera is a CAPcam - a computerised view camera. Details here -

https://www.capcam.org/

In normal use, the camera is designed to be used with Medium Format Digital Backs.

I had an adapter plate manufactured that has a Mamiya 645 lens mount on it - this allows me through the use of lens adapters to mount all sorts of cameras on the back of the CAPcam to use their sensors and shutters in place of my Phase One back. The initial drive for doing this was so that I could start shooting video, but with the release of the S1R, I realised that maybe I could replace the Phase One for stills as well.

Currently it's very much a work in progress set-up (just started playing with it all this morning). The CAPcam software cannot read the RAW from the Panasonic, and whilst it should be able to read a JPEG, it's not working. They are looking into this for me.

So what I have to do at the moment (if I want to set tilt and swing) is a little bizarre - I set everything up using a Sony A7III (whose files the software can read), then take that off the CAPcam and attach the Panasonic.

Kind regards,


Gerald.
Very interesting set-up, certainly not for the casual macro shooter :clap: Looking forward to see some of the magical results you can get with a tool like this.

I'm just curious (no plans from me to get into this kind of macro shooting) but I'm wondering what's the advantage of trying to use a Panasonic camera (on jpeg only) vs. just sticking with the Sony cameras that seem to work for both jpeg's and raw's?
 

gerald.d

Active member
Very interesting set-up, certainly not for the casual macro shooter :clap: Looking forward to see some of the magical results you can get with a tool like this.

I'm just curious (no plans from me to get into this kind of macro shooting) but I'm wondering what's the advantage of trying to use a Panasonic camera (on jpeg only) vs. just sticking with the Sony cameras that seem to work for both jpeg's and raw's?
Apologies for not explaining clearly - the CAPCam software needs to be able to display an image in order that I can set focus correctly. It’s not used for anything other than that - I still shoot the RAW for processing.

Kind regards,


Gerald.
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Apologies for not explaining clearly - the CAPCam software needs to be able to display an image in order that I can set focus correctly. It’s not used for anything other than that - I still shoot the RAW for processing.

Kind regards,


Gerald.
Very interesting concept, and I suppose the S1R with its multishot ability is more or less ideal for this. I watched one of their tutorials, and it's quite impressive. What's the price of this device?
 

gerald.d

Active member
Ok so here is the first semi-serious attempt at getting a decent shot from the S1R mounted on the CAPcam.



This is a high resolution shot, four images focus stacked.

With the S1R unable to shoot high resolution with strobes, I relied on a single Rosco Litepad for illumination with my own custom light modification set-up. Obviously these are not as bright as strobes and with ISO at 50 and the lens (Schneider APO Digitar 5.6/120 Aspheric) at f/8, shutter speed was forced to 1 second for an exposure that was underexposed about half a stop.

Lens focal plane was both swung and tilted by about 16 degrees on each axis (I had to set this up first with my Sony A7iii since, as explained earlier, currently the CAPcam software is unable to read the files from the Panasonic).

This was very much a case of testing the current workflow, and I didn't pay any attention to lighting the case of the watch, purely interested in nailing the dial as best I could.

Four images processed very lightly through Capture One, then stacked in Helicon focus.

Here are some 800x1000px crops from the full frame shown above (I say full frame - I tend to crop everything to 4x5 ratio)







All in all, fairly happy with the way this turned out for a first test, but I think the Panasonic is pushing the Schneider beyond its limits here. I have plans to replace the Schneider with the Rodenstock 5.6/105mm in the hopefully not too distant future.

Kind regards,


Gerald.
 
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