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Fun with the Fuji X ___!

J

JohnW

Guest
I just got an X-M1, mainly because I've missed waist-level street shooting with the Nex 7 since switching to Fuji. I still have the Sony, but definitely prefer the Fuji BW output.

I tried the X-M1 with the 35, but didn't like the handling much, so I bought a used 27, and they make a very nice combo. A few first shots as I learn the camera.

John








 
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ReeRay

Member
Nice set there John and well timed as I also have been looking at the X-M1 purely for the articulated screen. I may well push the button now.
 
J

JohnW

Guest
Nice set there John and well timed as I also have been looking at the X-M1 purely for the articulated screen. I may well push the button now.
Mine was unused and came from a kit from which Adorama took the zoom. It's amazing that you can get an X-Trans camera for so little. Rumor has it that the X-Pro 2 will have a flip screen, but I didn't want to wait.

There are some compromises--notably no physical manual focus switch. I miss that.

John
 

jsf

Active member
View attachment 82366
Fuji XT1 55-200mm Florida

I purchased the Novoflex adapter and have been using an ancient Nikon f/1.4 wide open on the Fuji. It handles the focusing well, the lens is deliciously soft. I will say this about the Fuji lenses, they seem to be Pro quality as sharp as my Pro Nikon gear. It is a very nice rig and quite light weight. Three lenses and the camera weigh in at 3 lbs.
 
All in a night's work...er.. fun.
Stringer's Oak

The property on which this old, dead, Oak Tree stands is that of a Mr. Stringer. The location is about six miles from Valley Mills, Texas. I received permission to photograph it after dark on his ranch and did so on August 17, 2014 using the Fuji X-T1 and the 18mm f/2.0. This was an 15 second exposure.




The tree itself is quite amazing in that its circumference at the base has to be about 20 to 30 feet if not greater. It is huge. That would indicate this old tree has been standing for well over 200 years while growing and probably standing about 50 years in its current state. Trees in Texas do not grow as big as those in other parts of the country so with that in mind, you can imagine how very old this tree was when it finally gave up the ghost. Why did it die? I have no idea. It could have been from disease, drought, pest or something else entirely.

It was a pleasure to photograph it. Coyotes yipping in the distance and a cool Southwest breeze blowing away the 102 degree high of the day. I packed up my camera gear around 12:30 AM and made it back home in Dallas at 3:30 in the morning. Yes, very tired today but happy to have crossed paths with this old tree and a beautiful night sky.
 

Elliot

Active member
Very effective combination of the sky's depth and expanse, the setting sun (or is it another light source?), and the texture of the tree.
 
Very effective combination of the sky's depth and expanse, the setting sun (or is it another light source?), and the texture of the tree.
The light is the light pollution from a town about 10 miles away... in this case it actually added to the photo. Below is a shot that I like even better. This one without the light painting and the clouds were just beginning to roll in. The stars are still visible in this one. A friend of mine viewed this earlier today a commented that it had a 3D look to it.

The old Oak tree standing watch like a sentinel.

 

fordfanjpn

New member
I prefer this one.

Bill

The light is the light pollution from a town about 10 miles away... in this case it actually added to the photo. Below is a shot that I like even better. This one without the light painting and the clouds were just beginning to roll in. The stars are still visible in this one. A friend of mine viewed this earlier today a commented that it had a 3D look to it.

The old Oak tree standing watch like a sentinel.

 

Elliot

Active member
I think both are interesting. The second one is from a slightly different angle and so obscures the telephone pole visible in the first one. To me, it also flattens the dimensionality of the earth-bound elements (trees, ground) and so relatively enhances the depth of the sky. I like silhouettes so that the second one is quite effective.
 
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