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Fun with the Fuji X ___!

darr

Well-known member



Fuji x100v @ ISO 3200
Proverbial Cat Test Shot: Joey, the three-legged ninja at my feet.

Just got the x100v today and here is one of my first shots. I will be having my x100t IR converted after I decided the IR work I enjoy doing is with a normal lens and want to keep the x100t just for that. Will be selling the X-E2 + xf 35/2 IR 590nm and my X-Pro2. I initially thought I would have the X-Pro2 converted, but decided against it because it is way too nice a camera to have ripped apart. Looking forward to shooting with the x100v.
 

spb

Well-known member
Had some fun with the XF200 for the first time in a couple of months. Egyptian Geese, very colourful and a bit different than the ubiquitous Canada Geese, on the Regents Canal, in Camden Town, London (England). X-T4, XF200f2+TC1.4x.

View attachment 188237
What a wonderful pose for you to shoot. Great shot, with a great lens!
 

Bugleone

Well-known member
Brilliant Louis!....These repay careful study,....the magpie wings now explained why they are so 'flashy'....the flight feathers are two-tone! The gull beaks are open, presumably for increased air intake, otherwise they are very aeorodynamic, undercarriage neatly stowed!
 

biglouis

Well-known member
Brilliant Louis!....These repay careful study,....the magpie wings now explained why they are so 'flashy'....the flight feathers are two-tone! The gull beaks are open, presumably for increased air intake, otherwise they are very aeorodynamic, undercarriage neatly stowed!
Thanks! Gulls are so common that people don't always appreciate what consummate flyers, they are. I think the beak is open in this photo because the gull is squawking a warning signal to its chick who was also flying around - not that a Magpie could do it much danger. I have seen a lot of activity between gulls and their chicks - in this case the juvenile in the second photo - and to me there appears to be a strong maternal instinct. Of course, all this could explain why there are so many because they breed and nurture so successfully and being excellent flyers they can get to food more easily.

The 'gull wing' is of course the basis for many aircraft designs, as well.

LouisB
 

Shashin

Well-known member


My wife and I took up a new hobby this summer--target archery. That is our local public range. It gets us out of the house several times a week. For scale, the spotting scope is 18 m (20 yards) from a 40 cm target. This lane lets us shoot up to 45 m or 50 yards. (The good news? After doing photography, archery seem down right cheap and, if you decide you don't like archery, you at least have a nice piece of gear for your zombie apocalypse survival kit (there are so few win-wins today!))
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member


My wife and I took up a new hobby this summer--target archery. That is our local public range. It gets us out of the house several times a week. For scale, the spotting scope is 18 m (20 yards) from a 40 cm target. This lane lets us shoot up to 45 m or 50 yards. (The good news? After doing photography, archery seem down right cheap and, if you decide you don't like archery, you at least have a nice piece of gear for your zombie apocalypse survival kit (there are so few win-wins today!))
The guy who taught me archery was a Green Beret sniper in his youth. Their spotting scope for sniper practice was an 8" Schmidt-Cassegrain :oops: .
 
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