The GetDPI Photography Forum

Great to see you here. Join our insightful photographic forum today and start tapping into a huge wealth of photographic knowledge. Completing our simple registration process will allow you to gain access to exclusive content, add your own topics and posts, share your work and connect with other members through your own private inbox! And don’t forget to say hi!

GFX + TSE 24 ii + LCC

diggles

Well-known member
Since LCC frames are used frequently with tech cam lenses I decided to give it a try with the Canon TSE lenses on the GFX.

Here are my first shot with the TSE 24 ii and no perspective adjustments…I did not shoot an LCC with this one.

2061_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_0x_0y.jpg

Here is the TSE 24 ii with 5mm of vertical shift and the corresponding LCC. There is some light fall off, but not much. Overall is it pretty clean.

2062_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_0x_5y.jpg2063_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_0x_5y.jpg

The vertical shift on this image was set to the 12mm max on the lens. You'll see the LCC is showing some vignetting in the corners. The third shot shows how the image cleaned up by applying LCC correction in Capture One.

2064_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_0x_12y.jpg2065_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_0x_12y.jpg2064_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_0x_12y-LCC.jpg

On this image the lens is rotated 30° with a 7mm shift. Not exactly sure how the numbers work out, but something like 7mm vertical and 7mm horizontal. You see the vignette is becoming dense in the bottom left corner. Applying the LCC cleaned this one up nicely as well.

2066_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_7x_7y.jpg2067_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_7x_7y.jpg2066_GFX-100s-Fringer-TSE24-ii_7x_7y-LCC.jpg
 

Ben730

Member
Warren
How would you rate the 24 TSE II? How is the corner performance when shifted?
What about back light, interior shots with windows?
I broke my Nikon PCE 24 and want to replace it, maybe better with the Canon...
The PCE 19 is with the GFX quite good, the PCE 24 was weaker. For best performance I still use my Rodie 23 HR with P1.
Thanks,
Ben
 

diggles

Well-known member
Hey Ben,

I just added the 24 TSE II to my GFX set up a couple of weeks ago and just used it on a job over the weekend so I don't have much field experience with it yet. In my opinion, it renders professional quality images. It's not my first choice though. When the composition will allow it I'll use the GF23. It's sharper corner to corner and renders more of a crisp quality to the images, but since it doesn't have T/S capabilities I can't always use it.

When I first started shooting client's projects with the medium format sensors I was thrilled that I can provide clients with these huge files full of detail, but in reality they don't need an 11648x8736 pixel file. Plus these huge files have been eating through my storage space at breakneck speed. What I've started to do is scale images down to about 8000x6000 pixels for delivery–still a big file with tons of detail. I'm even starting to do my compositing at those dimensions which is making a big difference in file sizes.

At the full resolution of the GFX100S the 24 TSE II is being pushed to its limits. After scaling the image down to 8000x6000 and applying some sharpening then it looks quite good. I'll send you a PM with links to a couple of layered TIFF files from the shoot I just did over the weekend. It will give you a good idea of what you can expect from the lens.

Cheers!
Warren
 

huyu

Active member
Interesting!!!
I'm thinking about the 24TS on my gfx50R. Can I get the files, too? On 50MP it might be better than 100MP I assume?

Hey Ben,

I just added the 24 TSE II to my GFX set up a couple of weeks ago and just used it on a job over the weekend so I don't have much field experience with it yet. In my opinion, it renders professional quality images. It's not my first choice though. When the composition will allow it I'll use the GF23. It's sharper corner to corner and renders more of a crisp quality to the images, but since it doesn't have T/S capabilities I can't always use it.

When I first started shooting client's projects with the medium format sensors I was thrilled that I can provide clients with these huge files full of detail, but in reality they don't need an 11648x8736 pixel file. Plus these huge files have been eating through my storage space at breakneck speed. What I've started to do is scale images down to about 8000x6000 pixels for delivery–still a big file with tons of detail. I'm even starting to do my compositing at those dimensions which is making a big difference in file sizes.

At the full resolution of the GFX100S the 24 TSE II is being pushed to its limits. After scaling the image down to 8000x6000 and applying some sharpening then it looks quite good. I'll send you a PM with links to a couple of layered TIFF files from the shoot I just did over the weekend. It will give you a good idea of what you can expect from the lens.

Cheers!
Warren
 

Ben730

Member
Thanks a lot Warren!
That's what I wanted to know.
The Canon doesn't perform good enough (to buy one) in my opinion.
When I use my PC 19 (with the Lucroit Hood) and crop I will have almost the same performance.
I agree, none of my architectural clients need 100 MP. Cropping or downscaling is a must.
In fact, some of my clients get angry, when the files are too big.
Regards,
Ben
 

diggles

Well-known member
The Canon doesn't perform good enough (to buy one) in my opinion.
Yeah, I agree. I wish the 24 was as good as the new 50 and 90 TS-E lenses. It's the best option (most practical) I've found in that focal length though. Just biding my time until Fuji releases their tilt shifts!
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Warren, this inspired me to order the adaptor for my old Canon 24mm T/S that I have had for years. Its so old it may have been a prototype for version i :) , glad to put it back in use. It produced a better image than I was expecting, thanks for the post!
 

biglouis

Well-known member
When I first started shooting client's projects with the medium format sensors I was thrilled that I can provide clients with these huge files full of detail, but in reality they don't need an 11648x8736 pixel file. Plus these huge files have been eating through my storage space at breakneck speed. What I've started to do is scale images down to about 8000x6000 pixels for delivery–still a big file with tons of detail. I'm even starting to do my compositing at those dimensions which is making a big difference in file sizes.
As an aside, I also stopped using my GFX MF for client work as it is to Fuji's credit that the APS-C cameras and lenses do a fine job on their own. I suppose if one was asked to a Vogue cover it might be mandatory but in general the results for architecture from the XF8-16 and for objects from the XF80/2.8 are more than enough for my clients. I loved looking at the images from my GFX cameras (and still do!) but in a practical sense it was more rewarding for me than anyone who was paying me for images, so in the end I sold all my GFX kit to fund the enormous but beautiful XF 200/2.

The fundamental problem with MF photography is the lack of really wide lenses, e.g. the equivalent of 12 to 15mm on a full frame camera. Hasselblad never really cracked it for 6x6, for example. For a time I did own and use the Laowa GF17mm for architectural interiors in order to get an even wider view than the GF 23mm which I always felt was actually never quite wide enough. The Laowa glass was decent but it needed to be stopped down considerably to sharpen the corners, e.g. f11-f16, It is an alternative if you are shooting interiors on a tripod which is what I used it for.

I do hanker after the GFX system. The 50S/SII sensor is imho one of the best sensors I have ever used. It has a luminosity it is hard to put in words and a wonderful sharpness. It is a bit noisy (surprisingly) but that can be ironed out - even more so now with the new range of AI noise reduction tools. If I had the funds I wouldn't hesitate to get the 50SII (over the 100S) but as it happens I am more likely to spend my money on the next generation Fuji X-H2 if it ever arrives as a priority.

Horses for courses. Just my two cents

LouisB
 

diggles

Well-known member
Warren, this inspired me to order the adaptor for my old Canon 24mm T/S that I have had for years. Its so old it may have been a prototype for version i :) , glad to put it back in use. It produced a better image than I was expecting, thanks for the post!
Hey Greg, did you get an adapter for the WRS? or are you using the 24T/S on a different system?
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Hey Greg, did you get an adapter for the WRS? or are you using the 24T/S on a different system?
No sir, although I have considered it, I got the GFX and an adapter. I am going to sell my XF & lenses, I wanted something that was a better handheld option.
 

diggles

Well-known member
I've been really happy with the GFX, it's a great camera. Which adapter did you go with?

I tried the Fotodiox Pro Fusion, but ended up sending it back because of an issue displaying incorrect f/stop when used with the Canon TS-E 50mm Macro lens. Even though the f/stop range of that lens is f/2.8–f/32, the adapter didn't go past f/22. It turned out that f/22 was actually f/32. This issue only occured with the 50mm Macro, the 24mm and 90mm worked fine.

I'm using the Fringer EF-GFX now and it has been working perfectly. I like how the adapter also acts as an aperture ring, my preferred way to change the f/stop.
 

diggles

Well-known member
All of the GF lenses I've used are really good, but my faves (the ones I use most) have been 23mm, 30mm, 63mm, and 120mm. I also have the 80mm and 100-200mm + 1.4x adapter. I used to have the 250mm and 110mm which are both awesome, but I sold them because I wasn't using the 250 and I chose the 120 over the 110 because of it's macro capability.
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Warren, I bought the GFX from @Steve Hendrix, about a week or so ago. At the time there were very few options on lenses, Steve said their testing of the 35-70 had been really positive so currently that is my only GFX lens. Honestly my expectations were pretty low but I have been amazed at the performance for the money! I am going to buy the 110 from a forum member and I think I want the 23mm when it becomes available (although I have consider just upgrading to TSE 24 ii). I bought the H to GFX adapter and will try that with my Hasselblad 210 and 1.7x, before looking at the 250mm.
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
I've been really happy with the GFX, it's a great camera. Which adapter did you go with?

I tried the Fotodiox Pro Fusion, but ended up sending it back because of an issue displaying incorrect f/stop when used with the Canon TS-E 50mm Macro lens. Even though the f/stop range of that lens is f/2.8–f/32, the adapter didn't go past f/22. It turned out that f/22 was actually f/32. This issue only occured with the 50mm Macro, the 24mm and 90mm worked fine.

I'm using the Fringer EF-GFX now and it has been working perfectly. I like how the adapter also acts as an aperture ring, my preferred way to change the f/stop.
Warren, I don't have the adapter with me but I believe the brand is Viltrox. I have only done one series of test shots with the 24T/S but it seemed to work well with that. I wish there was an adapter for the Leica S lenses that would control aperture and F/stops.
 

mota25

New member
Thanks. I am trying to read up on C1 site but not easy to follow. How do I make a profile to compensate for the light fall off when using TSE lenses.
 

diggles

Well-known member
Thanks. I am trying to read up on C1 site but not easy to follow. How do I make a profile to compensate for the light fall off when using TSE lenses.
Hey @mota25 , are you familiar with taking a second picture through a white piece of plexiglass to get an LCC reference image?

As far as I know, LCC is a term used in Capture One software, but it seems to be the most widely used term when describing the process. If you use Phocus then it is called Scene Calibration. If you use Lightroom then it is called Flat Field.

The process is the same with any lens/camera combo
  1. Photograph your scene as you normally would
  2. Take your reference image with a white piece of plexi (add about 2 stops of time to the exposure, do not change aperture as this will make the reference image useless)
  3. Follow your software's instructions for applying lens corrections for vignetting and color cast
There are many posts on this forum that discuss LCC correction. Try searching 'lens cast correction', 'lens cast', etc.
 

mota25

New member
Thanks. I was able to find some articles on how to do it. Need to try this as otherwise it is hard to correct when shooting with 24mm TSE lens.
 
Top