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HOW IT WAS SHOT! Please share the story behind your image!

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
This is a place where we would take an extra step of sharing a story behind our image. Why did you take a particular image? How did you decide on your composition? What gear did you use and why? It doesn't have to be long but please share more than just an image. I think it would be a great education experience for all of us. Thank you so much for participating.
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
©osztaba_palouse_20160523__DSF2273-Edit.jpg

This is a great example when I was able to overcome my initial excitement at seeing this lone tree when driving in the Palouse region. Providing a strong and inviting background for this lone tree was the challenge. Only when I lowered my camera and noticed the strong white lines on the road, did I come up with the idea of how to lead my viewer toward my subject. Even though the tree occupies a tiny portion of my frame, everything around it complements it. It took me about 30 minutes to visualise and compose the frame.

Taken in the Palouse region with the Fujifilm X100S.
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
©osztaba_Paris_20180919__DSF5919.jpg
GFX 50S
GF 45mm

When I was shooting in Paris, I was impressed by the number of stunning historical buildings. Having said that, it was difficult to capture those structures in an interesting and fresh way without repeating the same images we have seen a hundred times. I asked myself: How can I draw the viewer to an image where the main subject is a building?

When I was walking along the street, I noticed a huge gate to one of the government buildings. It was already quite late in the day, verging on the golden hour. I noticed that the light hitting the building was absolutely beautiful. I approached the gate and wanted to capture this beautiful light blanketing the structure. However, as I looked into my viewfinder, I quickly realized that it would be just another nice image. This is when I crossed the street and looked at the building through the large gate. Since the gate was in shadow and the building behind it was in a strong sunlight, I decided to underexpose the image by two stops.

That was exactly what my subject needed. The looming dark space created mystery and directed the viewer’s eye straight to the building, at the same time leaving some questions unanswered.
 

Don Libby

Active member


Capturing waterdrops using medium format.

Simple once you get the hand of it...

Fuji GFX 50s, GF 120mm, f/11 2-seconds ISO 500 2-flash units.

The flash(s) are what captures the waterdrops. Open the shutter on bulb, drop the water making the flashes go off then close the shutter. While it the shutter in this one shows a 2-second exposure it really was done in a blink of the eye.

The file was processed in Capture One before sending it to Photoshop for final processing. I used a mixture of clear water in the base and a small amount of food coloring to drop.
 

Don Libby

Active member


One more waterdrop.

Same basic setup as before this time using multiple drops and a colored backdrop.

Capturing waterdrops can be a mixture of fun and anger. Fun when everything works, anger when it doesn't. It can also be wet - very wet....
 

Don Libby

Active member


I like doing this a little differently.

This was captured using a Fuji GFX 50s, GF 45 f/2.8 at ISO 4000. The total time on this is 105-seconds which was made up of multiple captures before blending them together. The Milky Way can only be seen on very dark nights when there little to no moon and the best time to see or capture it is between 2 and 4 a.m.

This was taken near a n area where cattle are normally held so the footing can be somewhat dangerous and smelly.
 

rdeloe

Active member
I'm currently wrapping up the photography for a project on ephemeral and intermittent streams in southern Ontario. These are tiny, nameless streams that flow only part of the year, typically only after a good rainfall. Most people don't know how important they are for keeping larger streams and rivers flowing. In this project, I'm trying to make people more conscious about these little streams and why they matter.

The photograph I'm talking about in this post is actually showing a "permanent" stream. It has a name -- Hanlon's Creek -- and it flows year-round. I need a few pictures like this in the final project to help viewers understand the difference between streams that flow only part of the year (ephemeral and intermittent) and permanent streams. Hanlon's Creek gets some of its water from intermittent and ephemeral streams, but it runs year-round because its bed is located below the water table. This picture will be one of approximately 40 in the finished project.

Hanlon Creek.jpg

The photographs in this project are not meant to be documentary. Rather, I'm trying to make pictures that bridge art and science. As a group, I want the photos to be science-informed. However, the art leads -- so I need the photos to be able to work as art first. I want my love of this landscape, and how I feel about these little streams, to affect the viewer on an emotional level. As an extra challenge, the pictures need to be accessible. I need them to be the entry point for conversations about the importance of these little overlooked streams. Therefore, in this project I have to tamp down my preference for more abstract images and create pictures that are easier for people to engage with and understand. They won't engage if they can't understand what they're looking at.

In the area where I made this picture, Hanlon's Creek flows through a forest dominated by eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis). Living and dead, the cedars define the forest. In this frame I wanted the shape, texture and soft grey tones of the dead cedar tree against the dark water to draw the viewer into the picture. That called for a wide angle lens and a viewpoint right on top of the tree trunk. My widest lens is a Pentax 645 35mm f/3.5. It rides on a Toyo VX23D digital view camera, with a Fujifilm GFX 50R on the back.

Photographers (and painters) don't get to decide how people will look at a picture. The best we can do is sweep a path and hope the viewer will follow it. In this picture, I wanted viewers to follow the dead tree trunks to the sculpture created by their roots, and from there to explore the creek, the dense trees in the background, the creek bed, and the shoreline. To make it worth the viewer's while to roam these areas, I needed to provide depth and details -- enough to ensure there's always something else to discover by looking more carefully, but not so much detail that it's overwhelming.
  • To get the depth and details, I needed everything but the moving water to be sharp and in focus. That required combining tilt, swing, a bit of shift, and a small aperture (f/16). The plane of sharpest focus therefore starts at bottom-left, runs through the tree roots and then out roughly through the middle of the forest in the background. It's not parallel to the top and bottom of the frame because I combined tilt and swing; thus, the plane of focus is tipped to the right. This approach wouldn't have worked if I needed detail in the foreground at bottom-right, but it's moving water there so softness is fine; I just needed sharp focus to start with the rocks on the shore on the right. Focus stacking would not have worked because of the moving water; I dislike the cloudy, indistinct look of moving water shot with a long shutter speed or stacked images, so this had to be one frame.

  • To avoid overwhelming the viewer with details, I organized the picture into several regions: (1) the foreground fallen tree, (2) the bright bushes on the shoreline at right, (3) the dark flowing water in the creek, and (4) the background trees. Different tones (e.g., bright leaves, dark water), textures (e.g., soft flowing water, busy leafy bushes, light/dark areas in the background forest), and shapes (e.g., strong lines of trees, soft masses of leaves) helps visually separate the various regions.
Black and white photography benefits enormously from the ability to adjust how colours are mapped to tones. I take full advantage of this capability in Lightroom, where I do all the work. For example, the thing that drew me to this scene in the first place was the bright yellow-green leaves in the mass of bushes at right. I knew that in the black and white picture I could preserve their brightness using the colour channels.

Rob de Loë
www.robdeloephotography.com
 

diforbes

Well-known member
Appreciate the detailed write up and beautiful image! Very well explained and photographed. How would this have looked using the 35mm lens without using tilt and shift? I ask because I just acquired my 50r and I'm considering this lens to adapt to the camera. Thanks.
 

rdeloe

Active member
Appreciate the detailed write up and beautiful image! Very well explained and photographed. How would this have looked using the 35mm lens without using tilt and shift? I ask because I just acquired my 50r and I'm considering this lens to adapt to the camera. Thanks.
You're most kind. Thanks!

Without tilt and shift I would have had to either live with an out of focus mid- and background if I wanted the foreground tree trunk to be sharp, or I would have had to accept a soft foreground tree trunk in order to get reasonable sharpness in other parts of the picture. Neither of those scenarios worked for what I had in mind.

The SMC Pentax-A 645 35/3.5 is a really fine lens. It's one of the stars in the Pentax 645 lineup. It's not at its best at f/16 (f/5.6 is as sharp as it gets), but I'll trade off a bit of softness that I can make up in post for critical focus where I want it. There are some other excellent Pentax 645 lenses, including the 75/2.8 and the 45-85/4.5. However, when I'm using my VX23D the only Pentax 645 lens I carry is the 35/3.5. After that it's all enlarger and technical camera lenses.
 

rdeloe

Active member
I use that exact one when I don't want to carry the VX23D. Send me a PM and I can give you some ideas for how to make that work optimally; that way we won't take this thread away from the direction Olaf would like it to go!
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member


Capturing waterdrops using medium format.

Simple once you get the hand of it...

Fuji GFX 50s, GF 120mm, f/11 2-seconds ISO 500 2-flash units.

The flash(s) are what captures the waterdrops. Open the shutter on bulb, drop the water making the flashes go off then close the shutter. While it the shutter in this one shows a 2-second exposure it really was done in a blink of the eye.

The file was processed in Capture One before sending it to Photoshop for final processing. I used a mixture of clear water in the base and a small amount of food coloring to drop.
Great! Thank you for sharing.
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
I'm currently wrapping up the photography for a project on ephemeral and intermittent streams in southern Ontario. These are tiny, nameless streams that flow only part of the year, typically only after a good rainfall. Most people don't know how important they are for keeping larger streams and rivers flowing. In this project, I'm trying to make people more conscious about these little streams and why they matter.

The photograph I'm talking about in this post is actually showing a "permanent" stream. It has a name -- Hanlon's Creek -- and it flows year-round. I need a few pictures like this in the final project to help viewers understand the difference between streams that flow only part of the year (ephemeral and intermittent) and permanent streams. Hanlon's Creek gets some of its water from intermittent and ephemeral streams, but it runs year-round because its bed is located below the water table. This picture will be one of approximately 40 in the finished project.

View attachment 176627

The photographs in this project are not meant to be documentary. Rather, I'm trying to make pictures that bridge art and science. As a group, I want the photos to be science-informed. However, the art leads -- so I need the photos to be able to work as art first. I want my love of this landscape, and how I feel about these little streams, to affect the viewer on an emotional level. As an extra challenge, the pictures need to be accessible. I need them to be the entry point for conversations about the importance of these little overlooked streams. Therefore, in this project I have to tamp down my preference for more abstract images and create pictures that are easier for people to engage with and understand. They won't engage if they can't understand what they're looking at.

In the area where I made this picture, Hanlon's Creek flows through a forest dominated by eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis). Living and dead, the cedars define the forest. In this frame I wanted the shape, texture and soft grey tones of the dead cedar tree against the dark water to draw the viewer into the picture. That called for a wide angle lens and a viewpoint right on top of the tree trunk. My widest lens is a Pentax 645 35mm f/3.5. It rides on a Toyo VX23D digital view camera, with a Fujifilm GFX 50R on the back.

Photographers (and painters) don't get to decide how people will look at a picture. The best we can do is sweep a path and hope the viewer will follow it. In this picture, I wanted viewers to follow the dead tree trunks to the sculpture created by their roots, and from there to explore the creek, the dense trees in the background, the creek bed, and the shoreline. To make it worth the viewer's while to roam these areas, I needed to provide depth and details -- enough to ensure there's always something else to discover by looking more carefully, but not so much detail that it's overwhelming.
  • To get the depth and details, I needed everything but the moving water to be sharp and in focus. That required combining tilt, swing, a bit of shift, and a small aperture (f/16). The plane of sharpest focus therefore starts at bottom-left, runs through the tree roots and then out roughly through the middle of the forest in the background. It's not parallel to the top and bottom of the frame because I combined tilt and swing; thus, the plane of focus is tipped to the right. This approach wouldn't have worked if I needed detail in the foreground at bottom-right, but it's moving water there so softness is fine; I just needed sharp focus to start with the rocks on the shore on the right. Focus stacking would not have worked because of the moving water; I dislike the cloudy, indistinct look of moving water shot with a long shutter speed or stacked images, so this had to be one frame.

  • To avoid overwhelming the viewer with details, I organized the picture into several regions: (1) the foreground fallen tree, (2) the bright bushes on the shoreline at right, (3) the dark flowing water in the creek, and (4) the background trees. Different tones (e.g., bright leaves, dark water), textures (e.g., soft flowing water, busy leafy bushes, light/dark areas in the background forest), and shapes (e.g., strong lines of trees, soft masses of leaves) helps visually separate the various regions.
Black and white photography benefits enormously from the ability to adjust how colours are mapped to tones. I take full advantage of this capability in Lightroom, where I do all the work. For example, the thing that drew me to this scene in the first place was the bright yellow-green leaves in the mass of bushes at right. I knew that in the black and white picture I could preserve their brightness using the colour channels.

Rob de Loë
www.robdeloephotography.com
Thank you for sharing your interesting project. I really appreciate that you took the time to summarise your project and share the story behind this photo.
 

Shashin

Well-known member


This is the Futon Daiko festival in Hachiman Shrine in Sakai, Japan. It is an annual festival than corresponds to the autumn moon. Teams of 70 men carry 2.5 ton floats through the shine and neighborhood for two days. Nigh is a special treat. It is also very crowded.

This is shot with a Horseman SW612, not the fastest camera. Certainly, there was no place to put a tripod, but I had this idea of using long exposures to catch the idea of motion and give a flow to the procession. Fortunately, Someone had put up a series of I-beams to support a limb on a 600-year old camphor tree. I took a studio clamp I had mounted a ball head on and clamped it to the I-beam. Pointing the camera was just guess work as the camera position was about arm's length above my head. The camera was hung upside down so I could set the focus, shutter speed, and aperture as well as advance the film--remember film?

Anyway, this I-beam worked out. This was one of a number of images I shot from this vantage.

Side note, I also had a Mamiya 6 hanging around my neck. At one point when the crowds were pushed back to make room for the float, the pressure of the bodies shattered the bayonet-mounted plastic lens hood on the lens (the camera was OK). As I said, it was crowded.
 

JeRuFo

Member


I stumbled onto this one yesterday. Not really a special outcome, but a good reminder to always keep your eyes open.
I found this in the midst of cooking dinner. I was cutting up a mountain of vegetables and when I cut this red cabbage in half I noticed the little landscape inside of it. So I quickly set it apart and got on with what I was doing.
A few days later when I finally had some time I took it out of the fridge and shot it, just on the table in our living room on. I had no time to really light it properly, but I noticed it started losing its crispness, so I had to shoot it right away. I did quickly grab my 4x5, since I knew it had to be black and white anyway and I still had film holders loaded.
 

rdeloe

Active member
I really enjoyed your cabbage photo. Even though I know what it is, I'm able to see past that and imagine other things. The top reminds me of a geological cross section, the bottom is a creature reaching through the crust of the earth. Or perhaps it's a stylized sun? The fact that I can look at it for a while and see different things says it worked.

As an aside, some people would call this "abstract". I think that's incorrect. This is an image of a real thing. But it's not immediately apparent what it is, and as I tried to show, even when we know what it is, we can still see other things. I really enjoy these kinds of photographs.
 

JeRuFo

Member
I really enjoyed your cabbage photo. Even though I know what it is, I'm able to see past that and imagine other things. The top reminds me of a geological cross section, the bottom is a creature reaching through the crust of the earth. Or perhaps it's a stylized sun? The fact that I can look at it for a while and see different things says it worked.

As an aside, some people would call this "abstract". I think that's incorrect. This is an image of a real thing. But it's not immediately apparent what it is, and as I tried to show, even when we know what it is, we can still see other things. I really enjoy these kinds of photographs.
It is fun. It was kind of a departure for me, but also an eye opener in a way.
I see a tunnel of trees over a road with light in the distance and maybe an evening sky above (a bit like a Munch painting).
But I can definitely see the tentacles now, didn't see that one yet.
 
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