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IR filters on modern mirrorless cameras?

alajuela

Member
Hand held using an unconverted camera and IR filter:



I actually think long exposures not only result in sharp images, but the object motion is great to work with.





But motion does not have to be that noticable.





Sharpness is simply not a problem with using a stock camera and filter. Perhaps you don't like motion blur in objects, but that is a problem in regular landscape photography when maximizing DoF and minimizing ISO. Sure, if you want to maximize technical quality, a converted camera is best, but much can be done without a converted camera (see above).

And one of the appeals of IR photography is not its sharpness, but its aesthetic qualities of a lack of detail and and the tonal distribution (IR will never give the detail found in light photography).

These are really nice shots, and being in South Florida I certainly appreciate them. Motion blur with me is hit or miss, generally I try to avoid it unless i want to show movement. In the case of other people - certainly the shots you posted, I find it very artistic and interesting, maybe I don't have that confidence. I have shot on an unconverted camera, and certainly is easier if the filter starts in the 600nm range. I am just saying that a converted camera, does not have to be limited to IR. I think people tend to overlook this.
 

Shashin

Well-known member
These are really nice shots, and being in South Florida I certainly appreciate them. Motion blur with me is hit or miss, generally I try to avoid it unless i want to show movement. In the case of other people - certainly the shots you posted, I find it very artistic and interesting, maybe I don't have that confidence. I have shot on an unconverted camera, and certainly is easier if the filter starts in the 600nm range. I am just saying that a converted camera, does not have to be limited to IR. I think people tend to overlook this.
I totally agree a specialized camera will give better results. And certainly a full spectrum conversion camera is a really good compromise. Still, you need to get filters for all your lenses to do white light photography. I am curious, have you found that lens IR cut filters give the same response as the original camera filter? Or do you have to work a bit more to get good color--I have heard different things and maybe that is a camera specific thing.

I guess I am looking at the OP who is thinking of getting his feet wet with IR. I think camera conversion can be a big leap for some. Having done IR, I also know it is not where most of my photography is. I enjoy it from time to time, but it isn't a type of photography where I would dedicate significant resources. I think if I did really click with IR, I would convert a camera (although a member converted a Sigma camera with a Foveon sensor and is getting some remarkable results that are tempting). But I find a simple filter lets me scratch the itch when I get it.

For me, getting a filter is such an easy first step to see if you like it. And to be honest, when you start out, it is such an alien tonal range it takes a while to come to terms with it--it is nothing like processing white light black and white images. And the lighting conditions for successful IR photography is far more limited, at least in my experience.
 

alajuela

Member
I totally agree a specialized camera will give better results. And certainly a full spectrum conversion camera is a really good compromise. Still, you need to get filters for all your lenses to do white light photography. I am curious, have you found that lens IR cut filters give the same response as the original camera filter? Or do you have to work a bit more to get good color--I have heard different things and maybe that is a camera specific thing.

I guess I am looking at the OP who is thinking of getting his feet wet with IR. I think camera conversion can be a big leap for some. Having done IR, I also know it is not where most of my photography is. I enjoy it from time to time, but it isn't a type of photography where I would dedicate significant resources. I think if I did really click with IR, I would convert a camera (although a member converted a Sigma camera with a Foveon sensor and is getting some remarkable results that are tempting). But I find a simple filter lets me scratch the itch when I get it.

For me, getting a filter is such an easy first step to see if you like it. And to be honest, when you start out, it is such an alien tonal range it takes a while to come to terms with it--it is nothing like processing white light black and white images. And the lighting conditions for successful IR photography is far more limited, at least in my experience.
Hi

You are being very practical, Even getting a Point and Shoot IR with maybe a one inch sensor and gives raw files and throwing in the bag could be fun, and educational.

I agree, IR is nice, but to just do IR after a while becomes tiresome, I like it, and thinks it add some spice to images occasionally, and fun to do and experiment with. To just get started certainly just getting a filter maybe a 720nm or something from the 600s is easy to get your feet wet and certainly can get great results like the ones you posted.

As far as the hot filter goes, the answer is yes - I did a couple of test a few years ago





I was surprised about the B+W 486 since it is so popular, the MaxMax and Kolari appear to have a sharper cut. The B+W is easy to correct in raw., but still surprised.

I should mention, these were taken with a full spectrum converted Fuji x-pro 1 - also a similar experience with a full spectrum Phase P45+

Thanks

Phil
 
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