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Landscape Photography

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
Let's share and discuss some landscape work here. Please note that by posting an image you invite others to critique and discuss it. Let's make it great learning experience.
 

jrp

Member
Ok as a scene, but the post process has made it too contrasty and saturated. The colour balance seems a bit too magenta on my screen.
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
Ok as a scene, but the post process has made it too contrasty and saturated. The colour balance seems a bit too magenta on my screen.
I think you are absolutely right. It is one of my oldest images and I knew something was off with it. You are right about magenta. It is interesting because the longer I photograph, I use less contrast. Thank you for taking it on.
 

spb

Well-known member
A human on the bridge additionally to the contrast adjustment already mentioned would make this a winner.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
@olafphoto, beautiful scene, for me just a tad more contrast in the falling water would probably improve it, the dark surroundings (part of the overall large contrast of the scene) doesn't bother me.



I'll be second, also with an older shot (May 2016)


The last rays of the setting Tuscan sun kissing the hillside


Sony A6000 + OM Zuiko 85/2
 

Shashin

Well-known member
@olafphoto, beautiful scene, for me just a tad more contrast in the falling water would probably improve it, the dark surroundings (part of the overall large contrast of the scene) doesn't bother me.



I'll be second, also with an older shot (May 2016)


The last rays of the setting Tuscan sun kissing the hillside


Sony A6000 + OM Zuiko 85/2
I really like the structure of the land is echoed in the clouds--interweaving rolling structures. The sky here is not subservient to the land, but holds equal weight.
 

olafphoto

Administrator
Staff member
Beautiful light and rolling hills. I agree with @Shashin that clouds nicely complement rolling hills. Having said that, I would prefer the hills to be less busy as structures are spread out quite chaotically. Other than that, it is a very warm, peaceful image. Thank you for sharing.
 

spb

Well-known member
It's beautiful strong and emotive. I think it needed an attractive fully clothed young lady with a sun umbrella or a cowboy attired man middle right on the raised stone with pistol drawn to give some perspective.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
The Isle of Skye.
Great mood, the clouds, the fog, the desaturated greens all point at some gloomy weather, which is not uncommon on the Quiraing. Last year september we went there 4 mornings, only one day we had a nice sunrise. Two days we didn't even get out of the car since it was a blowing gale with horizontal rain. No way to keep the front lens dry.

I think this is the same rock in slightly better weather, but not as dramatic by a long shot (I also welcome comments, suggestions and critique)

Sony A7 + FE24-70/4 CZ
 

pegelli

Well-known member
As always I welcome any and all critiques.
Nice composition and I like how you've built up the layers from orange to yellow/green to blue/green and then the blue of the sky. However I find the colours and contrast a bit too overprocessed for my taste. And I think I see a dust bunny in the middle of the sky, near the top edge.
 

jsf

Active member
Yes, I do believe it is the same feature from a bit of a different angle. It is either a dust bunny or a bird. One more thing to spot out. It was raining hard when I took this image. I was wet for a month since it rained literally every day. I am curious when you say over processed for your taste? What looks like it is over-processed? The colors were de-saturated a bit. The tonal values were as is usual for me processed. There really is not a lot of processing going on in this image. Of course, what is not a lot of processing for me might be a lot of processing for someone else.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
Joe, I think the "overprocessed" impression I have from the second image is mainly the sky (the clouds look a bit too contrasty and the blue behind seems a bit black-ish) and secondly the greens in the middle seem a bit too contrasty. It also seems the photo is a bit soft overall, I can't find one region that is sharp to rest your eye on, therefore I keep going around the image which may also add to the impression of too much processing. But as always, this is just the impression the image makes on me. I wasn't at the scene and have no idea how it looked when you were standing there.
 

jsf

Active member
Joe, I think the "overprocessed" impression I have from the second image is mainly the sky (the clouds look a bit too contrasty and the blue behind seems a bit black-ish) and secondly the greens in the middle seem a bit too contrasty. It also seems the photo is a bit soft overall, I can't find one region that is sharp to rest your eye on, therefore I keep going around the image which may also add to the impression of too much processing. But as always, this is just the impression the image makes on me. I wasn't at the scene and have no idea how it looked when you were standing there.
It was a fairly heavy, fast, and steady rain. I suspect this mitigated any critical sharpness. The sky was changing rapidly as the winds aloft were vigorous. The sky was dramatic. I process for tonal values which often carries color contrast along with it. I desaturate the color a bit usually because of this. Because I process for tonal values the sky tends to become for photographically lively. It seems to me that we discount the sky a bit in landscape. But I understand how aesthetically it is not popular to have the sky be so dramatic. It is a common critique I get. Aesthetically it is my impression of the atmospherics. Having done a lot of aerials I am acutely conscious of the ocean of air above, the violence of cumulus clouds as an example. I thank you for the critique and further explanation. I have learned to live with the fact that my sense of picture is not in line with other practitioners of our craft. I do not look at this as a negative nor a positive. I accepted and made my peace long ago that I am usually the oddity and I am comfortable with that. I really have no clue what to do about that.
 

jsf

Active member
I really like taking landscape and compressing it with a long lens. There are two kinds of images; one is contained with a single point to rest your eyes upon, all of the elements lead directly to this one point. The other is more complex, an uncontained image is a low percentage attempt in composition. When it works it is quite arresting, when it doesn't work it is quite disturbing. Most people who like landscape images really dislike uncontained landscape images. An uncontained 'abstract' image is generally accepted, I cannot imagine what an uncontained portrait might look like. But uncontained landscapes fall into that nether region of acceptability. One's eye never rests, flowing along the lines seeing the detail but never alighting. My suggestion is to look at the image as if the central point was everything between the four corners.
 

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