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Medium Format and Coffee

dave.gt

Well-known member
I hope this is not against the guidelines, but dave.gt pointed to this thread to me, and I had already written up on how I make hand roasted coffees...here is the link.

https://deployant.com/chillout-tgifridays-stay-home-activity-hand-roast-your-own-coffee/

Not a medium format image, but here is a rather recent roast. Bolivian Bird Friendly Superior AA. About 8 mins to completion of drying phase from charge. 8 minutes further to first crack, and about 4 minutes of roast development to completion. The charge weight was about 180g, and final coffee weighed about 150g. I have been hand roasting for about 20 years, a bit longer than my medium format habit, so may have some tiny experience with it. I have been tempted with a more professional roaster, like the Hottop and run Artisan software, but so far have resisted.

View attachment 149473
Ah, Peter, going back to your link, I find it fascinating. Everything from roasting to watches! Thanks for sharing.:)

I will be in touch, you have piqued my interest more than once about a number of things!
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Sounds like you roast your own. :)

I wish, but it is just not practical at the moment for me. I will have to order a specific roast from somewhere. I don't mind picking up a grinder though.

With the pandemic, I find it far too risky to go inside a coffee shop for an espresso or anything, and the drive-thru lines are far too long at the local coffee house, so I will make my own for the foreseeable future.

Just what should I purchase to use in a Bialetti?:)
I use a Costa Rica Dark Roast, ground to espresso grade, from the local roaster (Dana Street Roasting Company, Mountain View, CA). They have been open for take-out throughout the pandemic, outdoor seating when the county/local city regulations permit, and I have not felt unsafe in visiting to pick up my coffee every couple of weeks. They maintain strict protocols, sanitation, and pick up guidelines. I give the owner (Nick) and his staff high marks for continuing to operate in a sane, safe, and responsible fashion despite all the craziness and weirdness of the past year.

The coffee is outstanding, brewed in my stainless-steel Bialetti (compatible with my induction stove top). :)

G
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
I use a Costa Rica Dark Roast, ground to espresso grade, from the local roaster (Dana Street Roasting Company, Mountain View, CA). They have been open for take-out throughout the pandemic, outdoor seating when the county/local city regulations permit, and I have not felt unsafe in visiting to pick up my coffee every couple of weeks. They maintain strict protocols, sanitation, and pick up guidelines. I give the owner (Nick) and his staff high marks for continuing to operate in a sane, safe, and responsible fashion despite all the craziness and weirdness of the past year.

The coffee is outstanding, brewed in my stainless-steel Bialetti (compatible with my induction stove top). :)

G
Thanks, Godfrey!

A local roaster here has a really nice Guatemalan roast. If I get my Bialetti, have him grind his roast to espresso., and pick up a milk frother I think I might be in business!:)

Dave
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
Please, please, please get a good grinder, and don't have the roaster grind the beans. Grounds stay fresh for a few minutes and go stale very fast. Grind enough to make one single moka pot, or enough for a single/double espresso. Never more.

Thanks, Godfrey!

A local roaster here has a really nice Guatemalan roast. If I get my Bialetti, have him grind his roast to espresso., and pick up a milk frother I think I might be in business!:)

Dave
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Please, please, please get a good grinder, and don't have the roaster grind the beans. Grounds stay fresh for a few minutes and go stale very fast. Grind enough to make one single moka pot, or enough for a single/double espresso. Never more.
While I do agree with the concept, my taste buds are not sensitive enough to tell the difference at the time of my first cup of coffee in the morning... as I'm having with my Bialetti brewed cup right now. (Yum, yay!) I buy enough and have it ground such that it lasts me about two weeks, and it is kept in an air-sealed coffee grounds container.

For my afternoon cup, I walk to the local cafe and have my espresso ground and brewed fresh by the, um, attractive barista there. :D

G
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
While I do agree with the concept, my taste buds are not sensitive enough to tell the difference at the time of my first cup of coffee in the morning... as I'm having with my Bialetti brewed cup right now. (Yum, yay!) I buy enough and have it ground such that it lasts me about two weeks, and it is kept in an air-sealed coffee grounds container.

For my afternoon cup, I walk to the local cafe and have my espresso ground and brewed fresh by the, um, attractive barista there. :D

G
That reminds me, how does one train to be a barista?
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
LOL, :) outside of physical characteristics, is there a manual on how to prepare all the various coffees. There are so many drinks and methods, I get dizzy thinking about them.

Is there a "for Dummies" book on making various coffees?:)
 

anyone

Well-known member
Please, please, please get a good grinder, and don't have the roaster grind the beans. Grounds stay fresh for a few minutes and go stale very fast. Grind enough to make one single moka pot, or enough for a single/double espresso. Never more.
+1 That makes a huge difference. Grinders can be expensive, but a good hand grinder will do (at least it does for me) if you are willing to make the effort each morning to hand-grind.
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
LOL, :) outside of physical characteristics, is there a manual on how to prepare all the various coffees. There are so many drinks and methods, I get dizzy thinking about them.

Is there a "for Dummies" book on making various coffees?:)
It's like learning to play an instrument from a book. In the end, you have to have an idea what you're shooting for, and experiment until you get close. There is a TON of good advice that no one takes until they don't need it - for example, vary one parameter at a time until you REALLY know what effect it has. Grind, dose, temperature, yield...

Easy to do and a great experiment is to try a taste from each few seconds of the process, so you know how bitter the first drops are and you may choose to skip them. You also find out when the later coffee is no longer helping. Of course, experimentation gets expensive, so it's a balance. Scott Rao is a good and honest source on pour-over. Home-barista.com is great for espresso drinks and equipment.

I probably said all this earlier in the thread. It's been one of those years...
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
LOL, :) outside of physical characteristics, is there a manual on how to prepare all the various coffees. There are so many drinks and methods, I get dizzy thinking about them.

Is there a "for Dummies" book on making various coffees?:)
I'm utterly simplistic about it. I only make one thing, and I make it the same way every morning. And afternoon. And sometimes more than once in the afternoon .... LOL!

On my induction stovetop with the aforementioned beans and SS Bialetti:
- put in the water
- put in the coffee
- screw the top down
- put on the burner
- power on the burner to 5.5 setting
- set the timer for 13 minutes
- at 12.5 minutes, the Bialetti will start to gasp and gurgle as all the water has been pressured through the beans and the water level in the reservoir is below the pickup tube. If I'm not right by the stove, it turns off automatically (on the timer). Otherwise, I power it off.
- pour into cup (i use a tiny bit of sweetener and a bit of orange peel to spice it up a little).
- add two ounces of warm water on top to bring up the volume in my cup.
Done. Drink and wake up...

If you want to start making all those fru-fru drinks like they do at S'Bux, just start googling them on the web or YouTube. You'll get 80 variations on how to make every one of them.... :D

G
 

dchew

Well-known member
That sounds like a lot of work for a cup of coffee. Nescafe Taster's Choice is really easy to make.
:unsure:

Camera bag, tripod, technical camera, separate lenses, meter, focus, shift, tilt. Hmm; that's a lot of work for a photo. My iPhone makes really easy pictures.
:unsure::ROFLMAO:

Dave
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I suppose using a Nespresso machine is a bit like admitting I also shoot Micro Four Thirds?
Damn! I also shoot with Micro-FourThirds too! :eek:

Camera bag, tripod, technical camera, separate lenses, meter, focus, shift, tilt. Hmm; that's a lot of work for a photo. My iPhone makes really easy pictures.
LOL! I do that too...


His Name Is "V" - Santa Clara 2021
iPhone 11 Pro
Moment app, 2x camera
raw capture

It is what it is... :D

G
 
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