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Medium Format and Coffee

GeorgeBo

Well-known member
Thanks Dave! I have been using that roaster for about 7 years now. Has paid for it self several times over for sure. Especially with the cost of coffee now.

Po

Very cool, George!!! A great thing to do!!! And thanks for the image… I wish I could do that!:)
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Interesting question to consider:

My quest for my personal favorite of all cameras, the black paint Leica MP will always remain a dream and still it reminds me of the quality, beauty and simplicity of 35mm film cameras. It is a camera that will last a very long time in use as intended. And in a hundred years, it will be a popular collector’s item I am sure.

With coffee makers, is there a match of sorts to a fine camera like the MP?

This is one of those “sultry mornings on the back porch conversational here in the Deep South topics” that has me thinking about the disposable appliances and things we all have and I am growing weary of seeing them tossed aside, including cars. (Ever driven through the countryside and noticed all the junk cars around rural homes and in fields?)

As I enjoy the early morning light in the rose garden with a cup of coffee, I recall the hard work and ethics involved with establishing a small garden of sorts, all of which are good for the planet: recycling , repurposing, repairing, replanting, and rethinking. Over a cup of coffee, my mind is free to wonder.

I am now wondering about those disposable Keurig cups in the kitchen, but also about the coffee makers themselves? Are all coffee makers destined for the landfill?:(

My Moka pot has a fairly long life span I think. It is already a classic decor piece and can easily be passed down to grandchildren. LOL.

Pour overs? Maybe… glass, metal…

Espresso machines? I don’t have a clue…

Time for me to get back to work. Wishing everyone a grand week starting… now!:)
 

GeorgeBo

Well-known member
Dave,

Great post and I enjoyed reading it.

I started my coffee drinking in the Navy (1980). Back then I would drink pretty much anything that had caffeine in it to keep going through the midnight watches. So my bar was set pretty low from the start 😄

Over the years I tried a lot of machines and gadgets here and there. But I finally settled down to two things about 15 years ago. One for espresso and one for every morning coffee.

For espresso I have a Gaggia Classic. Nothing fancy and I can pull a shot that satisfies my wife's and my taste buds. Are there better machines out there? Absolutely, but we are not every day espresso drinkers.

Now for brewing every day and sometimes multiple times a day I use the Chemex pour over. I don't think I will ever go back to an automatic maker. Yes, I also have a Moka pot and french press in the cabinet that I got over the years and do use them from time to time for variety and we do have a Keurig that is used occassionally when it is grab and go and when guests are over.

So the short answer for me is: Chemex pour over. No moving parts, no electronics to break. Paper filter, coffee, hot water. Perfect cup of coffee :)

Hope you have a great week too.




Interesting question to consider:

My quest for my personal favorite of all cameras, the black paint Leica MP will always remain a dream and still it reminds me of the quality, beauty and simplicity of 35mm film cameras. It is a camera that will last a very long time in use as intended. And in a hundred years, it will be a popular collector’s item I am sure.

With coffee makers, is there a match of sorts to a fine camera like the MP?

This is one of those “sultry mornings on the back porch conversational here in the Deep South topics” that has me thinking about the disposable appliances and things we all have and I am growing weary of seeing them tossed aside, including cars. (Ever driven through the countryside and noticed all the junk cars around rural homes and in fields?)

As I enjoy the early morning light in the rose garden with a cup of coffee, I recall the hard work and ethics involved with establishing a small garden of sorts, all of which are good for the planet: recycling , repurposing, repairing, replanting, and rethinking. Over a cup of coffee, my mind is free to wonder.

I am now wondering about those disposable Keurig cups in the kitchen, but also about the coffee makers themselves? Are all coffee makers destined for the landfill?:(

My Moka pot has a fairly long life span I think. It is already a classic decor piece and can easily be passed down to grandchildren. LOL.

Pour overs? Maybe… glass, metal…

Espresso machines? I don’t have a clue…

Time for me to get back to work. Wishing everyone a grand week starting… now!:)
 

buildbot

Active member
Dave,

Great post and I enjoyed reading it.

I started my coffee drinking in the Navy (1980). Back then I would drink pretty much anything that had caffeine in it to keep going through the midnight watches. So my bar was set pretty low from the start 😄

Over the years I tried a lot of machines and gadgets here and there. But I finally settled down to two things about 15 years ago. One for espresso and one for every morning coffee.

For espresso I have a Gaggia Classic. Nothing fancy and I can pull a shot that satisfies my wife's and my taste buds. Are there better machines out there? Absolutely, but we are not every day espresso drinkers.

Now for brewing every day and sometimes multiple times a day I use the Chemex pour over. I don't think I will ever go back to an automatic maker. Yes, I also have a Moka pot and french press in the cabinet that I got over the years and do use them from time to time for variety and we do have a Keurig that is used occassionally when it is grab and go and when guests are over.

So the short answer for me is: Chemex pour over. No moving parts, no electronics to break. Paper filter, coffee, hot water. Perfect cup of coffee :)

Hope you have a great week too.
The Gaggia Classic is a great yet simple machine, I have had mine for ten years now. The pump broke a few years back and it was very easy to install an upgraded one myself.

For pour over, I went a little bit extra….(the Gaggia is hiding behind :) ) Also no moving parts! Or plastic :)
CBB871FD-124B-4487-BD0F-4B79CCBEFE58.jpeg
Shot with a Rollei Hy6, 120mm lens + Sinar emotion 22 DB. Converted to DNG before editing in Capture One.
 
Last edited:

fjablo

Active member
For pour overs I recently acquired a Hario Switch. It must be one of the most fail-safe coffee brewers out there. Almost impossible to mess up the brew with wrong grind size etc as long as the coffee is good and fresh.

The Moka pot is of course a classic and I enjoy the texture. But it's better suited for darker roasts imo. And/or for milk drinks.

Nespresso... it's convenient and the taste can be good, but for me that's where the good points end quickly: I find the texture extremely unsatisfying, esp. the crema is somehow just wrong -pretty sure it's being formed by air instead of CO2 in a 'true' espresso (also less oily than the true thing?). Very expensive per kilogram of coffee. Intransparent supply chain, likely shady business practices by Nestlé. Lots of waste...

I would always recommend a simple espresso machine like the Gaggia classic, a scale and a good hand grinder over Nespresso. But espresso always requires some amount of work and I can see how that's not for everyone.
 
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