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More Fun with Large Format Film Images!

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
This thing entered my life:


I love the idea of hand-held 4x5, although it's not a great idea for landscapes. Just the view out the window, but it works!
HP5+, 135/4.5 Schneider Xenar, 1/200 sec @f/16.


--Matt
 

Shashin

Well-known member
This thing entered my life:


I love the idea of hand-held 4x5, although it's not a great idea for landscapes. Just the view out the window, but it works!
HP5+, 135/4.5 Schneider Xenar, 1/200 sec @f/16.


--Matt
Matt, handheld 4x5 landscape photography sounds like a great idea. Although it will take a bit of practice.
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Actually, this works better than I expected (with a cable release).



I love the 1958 camera with tripod right out of the 1956 movie Forbidden Planet (obvious Krell design! :cool:) New carry-around kit!

--Matt

PS. Leica Q in Macro mode.
 

Shashin

Well-known member
Actually, this works better than I expected (with a cable release).

I love the 1958 camera with tripod right out of the 1956 movie Forbidden Planet (obvious Krell design! :cool:) New carry-around kit!

--Matt

PS. Leica Q in Macro mode.
Actually, it looks like left over parts from Robbie the Robot.

Is that a sports finder built into the front standard?
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Actually, it looks like left over parts from Robbie the Robot.

Is that a sports finder built into the front standard?
I always pegged Robbie as a Krell design implemented by Morbius. I was thinking of some of the other lab machinery as well. Disney did a great job! Not until Kubrick's 2001 (12 years later) were its special effects surpassed IMHO.

Yes, it has a sports finder with parallax correction, a working rangefinder (I have to get a different rangefinder cam to install a 90mm lens instead of the current 135mm), a ground glass screen with removable hood, and a rotating back. It's an amazingly competent little camera. It even has an electrically operated shutter button, but it needs two 22.5v batteries that are $25 each. I'll stick with manually tripping the shutter! The front standard has a pretty wide range of rise/tilt/swing. Sideways shifts and fall for wide lenses is a bit limited. The bed drops for very wide angles (I think a 65mm will work on it). It's not far off from the Tachihara field camera I once owned, but that was definitely tripod only.

--Matt
 

Shashin

Well-known member
Matt, you are making me miss my Wista VX technical camera. I certainly appreciate digital photography, but we lost a lot of things with film.

Nostalgia isn't want it used to be...
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
The seller of my Super Graphic kindly threw in a Fuji instant film back, 6 shots remaining, and an unopened box of film. Here's my first try (I know it's upside down - I like the composition better this way):



Part of this is not pulling the dark slide out all the way (it was in backwards), but how much of what you see is due to wildly expired film and how much is user error. I have no way to judge! Oh, the central vertical line is actually there - that's not an artifact.

Thanks,

Matt
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
New here, hi everyone

8x10 | TMY-2 | 150mm

View attachment 124000
This is a great photo.
Composition, lighting etc. I love the location too, wild, remote, but not - like your looking up through a basement. I appreciate these film threads as these take skill and understanding photography from a purist form that's so intimately tangible. I sold my Ebony SW45 and have been considering 8x10 for contact printing. There's a reason I never sold my Pentax 1% meter for using the zone system and I think this photo just made me realize it. Shooting digital has it's merits, but the intrinsic value of film as an art is something imo, that digital can never match. The overused HDR or tone mapping and the ability to shoot without really having any understanding of the fundamentals of basic photography. Thank you for rekindling this passion!
I develop my own film with a Jobo 1000 ATL, but that won't do for 8x10. Any suggestions on a drum developer with a roller?
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Another try with instant film - this time the pos/neg New55. Alas, I need practice. The print was very overexposed, the negative also overexposed (could have sworn it was ISO 100...) But you need a tray of concentrated (and thus expensive) fixer to develop the negative, and it's a slow process, and...



I'm sticking with good old-fashioned negative film. The SP-445 makes developing 4x5 B&W film very easy and doesn't use a lot of chemistry.

--Matt
 

chrism

Active member

Pippa 2017 #4 by chrism229, on Flickr
Chamonix 10x8, Nikkor-M 450mm/f9, Impact EX-100A strobe, Ilford HP5+, ISO 640, Diafine, BTZS tubes, Epson V850 scan.

I see it's time to filter my Diafine solutions again.

C.
 
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