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Picture or Die

Steve Hendrix

Active member
I suppose this could technically be in the large format section, but it doesn't have to be targeted at large format, let's just say this is the medium format version of this.

And what this is, is a great article I read last night about Thomas Joshua Cooper, and it concerned mainly his commitment to photography, and went through some of his exploits. And at one point, he made clear his photographic process was "Picture or Die". Haha!

But I thought, wow, now that is some level of commitment. The amazing thing is that he is still married, and she has even somehow convinced his partner to be part of this (she may have realized there wasn't a choice).

I recommend reading this article if you've ever had any days in which you're struggling to find your inspiration...

It will ask you to subscribe, but I believe it gives you a certain allotment of free articles per month:

New Yorker Article on Thomas Joshue Cooper


So what I am curious about is - what is the most extreme situation you have found yourself in to get that picture? (dire or otherwise, but extra points, I guess, for dire)
 
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drunkenspyder

New member
I recommend reading this article if you've ever had any days in which you're struggling to find your inspiration...

It will ask you to subscribe, but I believe it gives you a certain allotment of free articles per month:

New Yorker Article on Thomas Joshue Cooper


So what I am curious about is - what is the most extreme situation you have found yourself in to get that picture? (dire or otherwise, but extra points, I guess, for dire)
Thanks for this Steve. I've been in lots of places where I thought to myself "what the hell am I doing here?", but heh, you already know my story.
 

Pemihan

Active member
So what I am curious about is - what is the most extreme situation you have found yourself in to get that picture? (dire or otherwise, but extra points, I guess, for dire)


Picture or die! Don't show this to my wife or die! Remember "What happends at GetDPI stays at GetDPI"!

Here's two candidates to the most "Get the picture or die" moments I have been in. Both photographed by my partner in crime Chris who lives just outside Page, AZ.


As you can see on my shirt there were a fierce wind, so I had a hard time holding on to my hat and at the same time get the picture.





No worries, my gear is secured with a rope :grin:

 
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dave.gt

Well-known member
Picture or die! Don't show this to my wife or die! Remember what happends at GetDPI stays at GetDPI!

Here's two candidates to the most "Get the picture or die" moments I have been in. Both photographed by my partner in crime Chris who lives just outside Page, AZ.


As you can see on my shirt there were a fierce wind, so I had a hard time holding on to my hat and at the same time get the picture.





No worries, my gear is secured with a rope :grin:

Yes, we talked about that...:facesmack: :loco:
:ROTFL:
 

dchew

Active member
"The Ladders" down to the Mer de Glace and back up.


In 2015, I hiked to Refuge du Couvercle in Chamonix 45°54'37.2"N 6°57'55.5"E. Here is the view hanging out off one of the ladders.


The Mer de Glace has receded so far that ladders were installed for access. Most hire guides in the area so are belayed down, but I was alone. I was prepared with some basic protection and harness, but it turned out that was more trouble than it was worth. The ladders, cables and foot pegs were all solid. Just had to get over the exposure without being roped up.


Getting back up off the glacier is a bit tough because of how far it has receded. They've added ropes for temporary access to the base of the ladders.


The overnight hike was wonderful, but photos were a bust. Most of the time everything was socked in with clouds. A few quick breaks where the peaks broke through and a nice view at 4am made it fun. Here is a quick link to a few images, mostly just trail snaps:
https://davechewphotography.com/galleries/chamonix/

Dave
 

Pemihan

Active member
Here's another take of one of the pictures above and the photograph that came of it. This is BTW not the famous Horseshoe Bend but it is the Colorado River.




 
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Shashin

Well-known member
On hind sight, this makes my palms sweat...especially leaning over the edge to focus the rangefinder.



Canyon de Chelly
 
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GrahamWelland

Subscriber & Workshop Member
One step back, instant 3000ft free fall to death at Toroweap. Very sketchy climbing down, and even more sketchy crossing the split rock below to get to the better photo location.

Not a place to trip...

 
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GrahamWelland

Subscriber & Workshop Member
Gerald won the ultimate selfie with a drop the mic moment a while ago. No competition there! Hanging out at the top of the Burj Khalifa, even at the view level, is scary. He was way way above the public viewing platform and shooting a selfie on a long stick.
F2BE5026-C556-4ABC-BAA5-5B71CF3462B9.jpeg

This was pretty extreme...

 

gerald.d

Active member
Gerald won the ultimate selfie with a drop the mic moment a while ago. No competition there! Hanging out at the top of the Burj Khalifa, even at the view level, is scary. He was way way above the public viewing platform and shooting a selfie on a long stick.
Cheers Graham :)

The only way to really get a sense of the height is to consider the following (which is accurate to just a few meters).

When you're on the observation deck, you're the same height above ground as the roof of the Willis (nee Sears) Tower in Chicago is.

When you're on the pinnacle, you're the same height above the observation deck as the top of the Empire State Building is above ground level.

:loco:
 
Inside a shredding machine at a recycling plant. It was fully locked out and I had the key when I was in there. Climbed the sides during exposures because the shredding disks would spin under my feet.

IMG_6929.jpegIMG_6930.jpeg
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
I took this without a shark cage. :loco:



Matt


(I hope it's obvious that this is meant as a light-hearted gag and that I have jaw-dropped respect for the photographers in this thread.)
 
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