The GetDPI Photography Forum

Great to see you here. Join our insightful photographic forum today and start tapping into a huge wealth of photographic knowledge. Completing our simple registration process will allow you to gain access to exclusive content, add your own topics and posts, share your work and connect with other members through your own private inbox! And don’t forget to say hi!

Protection for Alpa lenses

Despite having procured a well constructed camera backpack, I can't help feeling a little uneasy hiking around and working out of it with unprotected, and delicate lenses. Yes, it's well padded inside the bag, but it just feels wrong placing lenses directly into the dedicated compartment totally 'naked'. Often, I will carefully wrap them in a soft cloth to minimize any sloshing around while in the field but I would like to explore additional options.

I can't find anything offered from Rodenstock/Alpa directly. Does anyone have other solutions/suggestions they are employing?




regards,

~ Tyler
 
Last edited:

JeRuFo

Active member
I don't know if and what filter system you use, but I keep the Lee filter rings for the 100mm system on my lenses wit the lee protection cap on. I don't use foam, but I make the compartments for the lenses so small that they fit quite snugly. That way the only point of contact with the sides is either the lens board or the Lee ring, the shutter can never touch the bag and the top is quite well protected, because the lee lens protector covers almost the whole compartment.
 

dchew

Well-known member
Hi Tyler,
I've been hiking, backpacking and even occasionally skiing with my kit for 8 years without issue, but I think it depends on which lenses you choose. I don't have the 32hr, which would be the most vulnerable lens because of the mass of glass relative to the relatively small Copal 0. The 90-hrsw is the heaviest lens I have; torque on the neck of lenses and getting them out of alignment has always been my biggest concern. I do place protection dividers in ways that protect the base, top and neck of lenses that have heavier glass. I also bring many lens cleaning cloths and wrap them around the neck of lenses.

My un-scientific assumption is that most of the aggressive force when hiking is in the downward direction. Not only each step, but when going down a steep trail, rappelling or skiing there are often small leaps or jumps. I orient each lens in a way that protects against that directional force, and then put the equipment in the pack with the same orientation all the time.

Dave
 

beano_z

Active member
Good to see that I'm not the only one who thinks like that, haha!

What I did was actually take out all the dividers in my f-stop ICU's and use the Tenba BYOB 10's instead for the lenses. I find that the BYOB 10 when divided in two equally large compartments is just the right size to fit two relatively larger ALPA mount lenses (i.e. the 32 or the 90). Somehow this setup gives me more confidence as the lenses are more snug fitting and are more secure form top to bottom, whereas the divider system tend to get weak and unstable in the middle section of the bag.

The other benefit is that when I pack or unpack I just move these BYOB's from dry cabinet to backpack and vice versa, and since I keep some of the smaller accessories in there as well, it makes packing and unpacking a lot easier for me.

Anyway, I'm probably just being OCD here, but it might help you out with your search for the ultimate bag / system.

BB

tenbats.jpg
 

epforever

Member
Good to see that I'm not the only one who thinks like that, haha!

What I did was actually take out all the dividers in my f-stop ICU's and use the Tenba BYOB 10's instead for the lenses. I find that the BYOB 10 when divided in two equally large compartments is just the right size to fit two relatively larger ALPA mount lenses (i.e. the 32 or the 90). Somehow this setup gives me more confidence as the lenses are more snug fitting and are more secure form top to bottom, whereas the divider system tend to get weak and unstable in the middle section of the bag.

The other benefit is that when I pack or unpack I just move these BYOB's from dry cabinet to backpack and vice versa, and since I keep some of the smaller accessories in there as well, it makes packing and unpacking a lot easier for me.

Anyway, I'm probably just being OCD here, but it might help you out with your search for the ultimate bag / system.

BB

View attachment 137118

Binbin -- thanks for this. Side question: What dry cabinet do you use? I'd like to get one that's locking as well.

Dave Chew -- So what you're saying is, you orient the lenses with the front element facing up towards the sky (when the backpack is on your back)? That makes sense to me. And do you re-orient them when laying the backpack down at home when not in use? I know that Alpa lenses are supposed to be stored resting on their bottoms / mounts.

thanks
ethan
 

tcdeveau

Well-known member
Binbin -- thanks for this. Side question: What dry cabinet do you use? I'd like to get one that's locking as well.

Dave Chew -- So what you're saying is, you orient the lenses with the front element facing up towards the sky (when the backpack is on your back)? That makes sense to me. And do you re-orient them when laying the backpack down at home when not in use? I know that Alpa lenses are supposed to be stored resting on their bottoms / mounts.

thanks
ethan
Ethan, here’s the dry cabinet I’m using - it locks. Not sure how it stacks up to others, but it seems to keep the humidity around the set point +/- a few %

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1282132-REG/ruggard_edc_80l_electronic_dry_cabinet_80l.html

-Todd
 

dchew

Well-known member
Dave Chew -- So what you're saying is, you orient the lenses with the front element facing up towards the sky (when the backpack is on your back)? That makes sense to me. And do you re-orient them when laying the backpack down at home when not in use? I know that Alpa lenses are supposed to be stored resting on their bottoms / mounts.

thanks
ethan
No, not exactly. I do have some lenses oriented as you described when the pack is on my back, but not all. Lenses that are "horizontal" when the pack is on my back have "saddles" of protection around the neck in the appropriate direction. In my case I'm carrying only four lenses and all but one probably don't need extra care:
  1. 35xl: Weighs almost nothing and is tiny. I don't worry about this one.
  2. 60xl: Not too heavy. I keep this attached to the camera, protected on all sides. with extra bunched-up dividers.
  3. 90hrsw: "Head up" when on my back, but still saddles and dividers to protect all directions.
  4. sk150: the lens itself is small but the helical is big (40.5mm filter threads). Lays horizontal when on my back.

Dave
 

LonnaTucker

New member
Despite having procured a well constructed camera backpack, I can't help feeling a little uneasy hiking around and working out of it with unprotected, and delicate lenses. Yes, it's well padded inside the bag, but it just feels wrong placing lenses directly into the dedicated compartment totally 'naked'. Often, I will carefully wrap them in a soft cloth to minimize any sloshing around while in the field but I would like to explore additional options.

I can't find anything offered from Rodenstock/Alpa directly. Does anyone have other solutions/suggestions they are employing?




regards,

~ Tyler
I've posted this before in a thread a few years back -- Simple food storage containers are excellent for protecting your tech or view camera lenses. They can be water tight and keep the dust off and most are clear so you can see through to the contents within. The hard sides keep your wide lenses from getting torqued and the shutters ruined. Better yet, they are inexpensive and can be very light in weight and can be stuffed into a true backpack without fear.

I found the perfect size in a round container with screw on lid for my Arca-Swiss Rm3di lenses at the Container Store in Phoenix. They were just slightly larger than the diameter of the R-mount lens and came in different heights. I've added a foam piece at the bottom and top of the container.

I can repack lenses quickly with no worries into a ThinkTank Roller to F-Stop Ajna backpack to Tenba Roadie backpack or a messenger bag, depending on what and where I am working.
 

vleugels2cv6

New member
Binbin -- thanks for this. Side question: What dry cabinet do you use? I'd like to get one that's locking as well.

Dave Chew -- So what you're saying is, you orient the lenses with the front element facing up towards the sky (when the backpack is on your back)? That makes sense to me. And do you re-orient them when laying the backpack down at home when not in use? I know that Alpa lenses are supposed to be stored resting on their bottoms / mounts.

thanks
ethan
Yes Ethan, I also told you this....
Store and transport always upright (ALPA barrel at the bottom). Store uncocked and at infinity. Never take a lens out a bag or hold it by the first element. Specially not the 32 and 90mm ALPAGON. Hold always at barrel and or helical mount.
 

epforever

Member
Yes Ethan, I also told you this....
Store and transport always upright (ALPA barrel at the bottom). Store uncocked and at infinity. Never take a lens out a bag or hold it by the first element. Specially not the 32 and 90mm ALPAGON. Hold always at barrel and or helical mount.
Yes, Ivo, I certainly remember. I was just checking if Dave and others change the orientation of the lenses when the backpack is on their back, vertical, versus when it's resting on the ground, horizontal. Thank you. I follow these guidelines for my lenses and am quite careful with them.
 
Top