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Sony A1 images

stngoldberg

Well-known member
Wolfpack (North Carolina State) has a top notch football coach in Dave Doeren and he has recruited a bunch of terrific athletes.
I had first row seats on the 50 yard line directly behind the Wolfpack bench and I could see and hear the athletes taking to each other and cheering for their teammates. The athletes seem to be highly motivated class individuals.
Although State led at halftime 10-7, they were outplayed in the first half.
During halftime the coaches showed the young men how to adjust; the team listened as they scored the next 21 unanswered points in the wind and the rain.
The final score was 31-7...wolfpack
image is the head coach DoerenF04D93E4-77AE-42E4-BE0B-259AB69536C2.jpegF04D93E4-77AE-42E4-BE0B-259AB69536C2.jpeg
 

spb

Well-known member
The a1 is ideal for wildlife photographers. High frame rate, focus that hits the target and won't let go, silent shutter with negligible distortion.
I have a problem with these to decide which one I like best because they are all so darn brilliant! I think the yellow-headed blackbird clinches it for me. Followed closely by the black chinned hummingbird.
 

aksclix

Active member
Sony is a huge company with an obvious technological advantage in sensor capabilities.
They have produced a camera that makes action photography stupid simple.
The camera locks on a moving subject, puts a square on the subjects eye (human or animal) and holds perfect focus anywhere in the viewfinder.
Set the camera on manual priority, set the ISO on auto, set the shutter speed on 1/2500 of a second and anyone can become a great action photographer.
Fortunately, or unfortunately this camera removes all the need for skill in sports and bird imagery.
stanley
before I say anything, I’d like to point out that my comments mean no disrespect to you or anyone.. just focusing on the subject and nothing else.. 😌 advance apologies if it sounds at all disrespectful.. (disclaimer out of the way..)

Tech is advancing at its own rapid pace.. while photography has become easier, it still does take certain level of skill to capture images that are at a league above an average photographer.. it still does take a lot of effort to plan the whole shoot, knowing how to use the tool takes some basic skill too, knowing bird behavior and waiting for the right shots etc is not dependent on how advanced the camera is..

IMO, the skill related to manual focusing is a bit over rated.. 1) it requires good eyesight, 2) it requires a LOT of luck!! Skillful manoeuvring of the manual focus ring WHILST hoping you get one or two shots in focus of a bird that might quickly change its course does take skill but a truck load of luck too..

So, one shouldn’t take away ALL the credits from a photographer for using the most advanced gear.. compare any BIF captures against Mark Smith’s galleries.. while he uses a Sony a1, he also uses a lot of his skill in capturing absolutely stunning images
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
before I say anything, I’d like to point out that my comments mean no disrespect to you or anyone.. just focusing on the subject and nothing else.. 😌 advance apologies if it sounds at all disrespectful.. (disclaimer out of the way..)

Tech is advancing at its own rapid pace.. while photography has become easier, it still does take certain level of skill to capture images that are at a league above an average photographer.. it still does take a lot of effort to plan the whole shoot, knowing how to use the tool takes some basic skill too, knowing bird behavior and waiting for the right shots etc is not dependent on how advanced the camera is..

IMO, the skill related to manual focusing is a bit over rated.. 1) it requires good eyesight, 2) it requires a LOT of luck!! Skillful manoeuvring of the manual focus ring WHILST hoping you get one or two shots in focus of a bird that might quickly change its course does take skill but a truck load of luck too..

So, one shouldn’t take away ALL the credits from a photographer for using the most advanced gear.. compare any BIF captures against Mark Smith’s galleries.. while he uses a Sony a1, he also uses a lot of his skill in capturing absolutely stunning images
+1 ;)
 
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spb

Well-known member
Plus of course no photographer says how many shots 'missed' or 'weren't to their liking' - me included. Even though I have an A1 now, I guarantee it will take me time to get used to things before I get some great birds shots. The menu system of the Sony whilst much improved can get very confusing to a newbie very quickly - and then suddenly it all starts to make sense after a few days! One issue I could not resolve was to get Bluetooth to work from a RMT-P1BT to the A1. It worked to a A7SIII for a day, and now neither works with the remote. Great! I bought it to to use it!
 

aksclix

Active member
Yeup! With the high speed shooting and tracking capabilities on offer today, you get to decide which one of the several “keeper” shots you want to keep.. whereas years ago, keepers were only a handful and you don’t have too many to choose from anyway..
 
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spb

Well-known member
Yeup! With the high speed shooting and tracking capabilities on offer today, you get to decide which one of the several “keeper” shots you want to keep.. whereas years ago, keepers were only a handful and you don’t have too many to choose from anyway..
I remember a lot of failed panned racing cars before I nailed a few.....
 
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