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Stitching

gmfotografie

Active member
Hello Guys, I want to make a very big print of a picture - e.g. 200 x 245.

Can you give me some tipps to get a good start into this ?
So I guess I can realize this with 4 Pictures to get ne Large Picture for this printing size.
Do I need a special Tripodhead (actually I own a C1) ?=

I want to do this with a 50MP digital and a 4x5inch.


THX !
 

dj may

Well-known member
Hello Guys, I want to make a very big print of a picture - e.g. 200 x 245.

Can you give me some tipps to get a good start into this ?
So I guess I can realize this with 4 Pictures to get ne Large Picture for this printing size.
Do I need a special Tripodhead (actually I own a C1) ?=

I want to do this with a 50MP digital and a 4x5inch.


THX !
Questions
What size sensor?
What focal length lens?
Distance from the subject?
What do you mean by 4x5inch?
 

rdeloe

Active member
Hello Guys, I want to make a very big print of a picture - e.g. 200 x 245.

Can you give me some tipps to get a good start into this ?
So I guess I can realize this with 4 Pictures to get ne Large Picture for this printing size.
Do I need a special Tripodhead (actually I own a C1) ?=

I want to do this with a 50MP digital and a 4x5inch.


THX !
Will viewers be able to see the print from up-close, or will it be mounted in a way that keeps people at a distance? Billboards meant to be viewed by people driving down the highway were printed at 10-15 ppi, which was fine because of distance. If viewers can't get close to the picture, you can get away with lower ppi for your print. But if people are going to be close enough to press their noses against it, you'll likely want ppi approaching the best your printer can handle. If your units are inches, that will be a huge file.

If by "4x5 inch" you mean you want to put a medium format back on a 4x5 camera, then you can flat stitch (lens standard stays put, rear standard with the camera moves). With that approach you won't have to worry about parallax, and you don't need a special tripod head. As long as it's sturdy enough to hold your camera you're good to go. Indeed, you could even mount your camera directly to the tripod and eliminate the head entirely. That's how many large format film photographers do it to eliminate any instability created by the head.

Are you going to be doing this a lot, or is this a one-time deal? I ask because a 4x5 camera is usually a poor choice. Unless it's a really precise machine, the tolerances might not be up to the task. And you'll be limited in lens choices at the wider end because the standards might not come together close enough. If you're doing this a lot, you could buy a modern technical camera that allows movements. If you're on a budget, depending on what back you're using, a used Toyo VX23D is economical. These were designed to be used with digital medium format backs. That's what I'm using (albeit adapted for use with a Fuji GFX 50R).
 

darr

Well-known member
If you are talking about using a 50mp digital back on a technical camera to make a panoramic, or a medium format camera to make a stitched image, it is not terribly hard if you have the right gear, and use good technique. I do this all the time with my Hasselblad cameras and CFV50c back because I prefer using my 100mm and 180mm lenses over wides. I use to make stitched images with my ALPA Max, but decided the Hasselblad cameras I have used for decades did just as well for my needs once I got the right gimbal head and leveling base.

Here is a recent example made from nine images and cropped to a square during post.



MY EQUIPMENT
I use this Gimbal Head (Fotopro E-6H) with a RRS tripod (14 Series) and Leveling Base (TA-2U):



I had a more expensive RRS Pano Head system, but sold it off and got a smaller setup because I travel with my gear and I do not enjoy carrying a lot of heavy gear.

TECHNIQUE
How I shoot is quite simple IMO. I decide what my composition will be and in the above shot it was all about the young pine tree. I waited for sunset, had the camera set up and practiced where my rows would be by looking through the viewfinder, finding the correct row areas (overlap by at least 1/3) and made note of the numerical guide on the angle knob.

When the light I wanted to shoot under appeared, I took a row of three bottom shots from left to right, then moved the gimbal head a few degrees up and began shooting the middle row from right to left, then moved the gimbal head another few degrees up for the top row and shot from left to right. I did this series of exposures a few times to ensure I got a good set.

Post processing was completed in Lightroom's pano builder and finished in Photoshop. I do not use any other pano processing software, although through the years I have but now Lightroom and Photoshop are more than enough for my needs.

--

There is a lot of gear out there that can accomplish this. Do not think you have to have the most expensive, etc. that is unless you are wealthy and like to buy gear, and by all means do support the camera industry! My point is, look at what you have and go from there.

You mention a 4x5, assuming you mean a 4x5 camera, I shoot with an expensive Linhof Master Technika 3000, but I would never use it for stitching as it would not be the right gear for my situations. The ALPA Max I once owned allowed stitching by using sliding partitions with the lens and digital back, but I like doing it better with my old Hasselblad 500 series cameras and lenses. Is it perfect? Probably not for everyone, but it works for me. Depending what you are shooting (landscape in my example) and what the environment your shooting in is, (calm weather in my case), these factors can play importance in your technique.

Hope this helps,
Darr
 

Hausen

Active member
If you are talking about using a 50mp digital back on a technical camera to make a panoramic, or a medium format camera to make a stitched image, it is not terribly hard if you have the right gear, and use good technique. I do this all the time with my Hasselblad cameras and CFV50c back because I prefer using my 100mm and 180mm lenses over wides. I use to make stitched images with my ALPA Max, but decided the Hasselblad cameras I have used for decades did just as well for my needs once I got the right gimbal head and leveling base.

Here is a recent example made from nine images and cropped to a square during post.



MY EQUIPMENT
I use this Gimbal Head (Fotopro E-6H) with a RRS tripod (14 Series) and Leveling Base (TA-2U):



I had a more expensive RRS Pano Head system, but sold it off and got a smaller setup because I travel with my gear and I do not enjoy carrying a lot of heavy gear.

TECHNIQUE
How I shoot is quite simple IMO. I decide what my composition will be and in the above shot it was all about the young pine tree. I waited for sunset, had the camera set up and practiced where my rows would be by looking through the viewfinder, finding the correct row areas (overlap by at least 1/3) and made note of the numerical guide on the angle knob.

When the light I wanted to shoot under appeared, I took a row of three bottom shots from left to right, then moved the gimbal head a few degrees up and began shooting the middle row from right to left, then moved the gimbal head another few degrees up for the top row and shot from left to right. I did this series of exposures a few times to ensure I got a good set.

Post processing was completed in Lightroom's pano builder and finished in Photoshop. I do not use any other pano processing software, although through the years I have but now Lightroom and Photoshop are more than enough for my needs.

--

There is a lot of gear out there that can accomplish this. Do not think you have to have the most expensive, etc. that is unless you are wealthy and like to buy gear, and by all means do support the camera industry! My point is, look at what you have and go from there.

You mention a 4x5, assuming you mean a 4x5 camera, I shoot with an expensive Linhof Master Technika 3000, but I would never use it for stitching as it would not be the right gear for my situations. The ALPA Max I once owned allowed stitching by using sliding partitions with the lens and digital back, but I like doing it better with my old Hasselblad 500 series cameras and lenses. Is it perfect? Probably not for everyone, but it works for me. Depending what you are shooting (landscape in my example) and what the environment your shooting in is, (calm weather in my case), these factors can play importance in your technique.

Hope this helps,
Darr
Hi Darr,

Thanks for this post. I have been a regular pano guy for a long while. I use a Benro Pano tripod head system for my multi row panos with a AS L60 leveller. After reading your post I am intrigued by your use of a gimbal head. Besides the weight do you see any other benefits of the gimbal over a multi row pano tripod heads? Mine is a cumbersome top heavy setup especially with the XCD120 in the wind on top of a mountain. Also since you posted this the E6H is sold out everywhere😀
 

darr

Well-known member
Hi Darr,

Thanks for this post. I have been a regular pano guy for a long while. I use a Benro Pano tripod head system for my multi row panos with a AS L60 leveller. After reading your post I am intrigued by your use of a gimbal head. Besides the weight do you see any other benefits of the gimbal over a multi row pano tripod heads? Mine is a cumbersome top heavy setup especially with the XCD120 in the wind on top of a mountain. Also since you posted this the E6H is sold out everywhere😀

Hi David,

Thank you for your reply.

An additional benefit besides weight is my setup time has been greatly reduced.

Once I learned finding the nodal point was essential *only* if you're using short or very short focals, I decided to redesign my pano gear around my 503cx, CFV50c, and the 100 and 180 lenses and get rid of what I did not need. I had been using most of the components of the RRS multi-row pano package along with a ball head, which I was not happy with. It was a cumbersome package with small components that required a more lengthy setup time than I wanted. After searching for a smaller gimbal head, I found a used E6H with a return option and decided to give it a try. I was immediately smitten with its capabilities, weight and size. My new pano technique fell into place and I have not looked back.

I learned If my gear gets in the way, then my workflow suffers, and my artistic side probably gets interrupted (not good). I demand a lot from gear as I am a quick shooter that wants to get it done and move on. The E6H has saved me time and weight, and has proven to be reliable, and for all of that I am thankful.

Best to you,
Darr
 

Hausen

Active member
Hi David,

Thank you for your reply.

An additional benefit besides weight is my setup time has been greatly reduced.

Once I learned finding the nodal point was essential *only* if you're using short or very short focals, I decided to redesign my pano gear around my 503cx, CFV50c, and the 100 and 180 lenses and get rid of what I did not need. I had been using most of the components of the RRS multi-row pano package along with a ball head, which I was not happy with. It was a cumbersome package with small components that required a more lengthy setup time than I wanted. After searching for a smaller gimbal head, I found a used E6H with a return option and decided to give it a try. I was immediately smitten with its capabilities, weight and size. My new pano technique fell into place and I have not looked back.

I learned If my gear gets in the way, then my workflow suffers, and my artistic side probably gets interrupted (not good). I demand a lot from gear as I am a quick shooter that wants to get it done and move on. The E6H has saved me time and weight, and has proven to be reliable, and for all of that I am thankful.

Best to you,
Darr
Thanks Darr,

That makes a lot of sense. I really like using my longer lens, XCD120, for my Panos. So are you just using the E6H as a side mount gimbal with an L bracket to shoot portrait? I use my XCD45 and XCD120 50/50% so I am not sure a gimbal would work unless I carry both. Would adding a nodal slide work? I am not the lens would be centred?
 

darr

Well-known member
Thanks Darr,

That makes a lot of sense. I really like using my longer lens, XCD120, for my Panos. So are you just using the E6H as a side mount gimbal with an L bracket to shoot portrait?
Yes David, that is exactly how I use this setup.

I use my XCD45 and XCD120 50/50% so I am not sure a gimbal would work unless I carry both. Would adding a nodal slide work? I am not the lens would be centred?
The only way to add a nodal slide on the E6H would be in the camera clamp in the arm and that is not adequate to center the lens. I would stay with what you have so you can continue to shoot with your shorter lens. A big difference between the RRS gimbal I had and the E6H is the horizontal rail on the RRS which allowed for horizontal movement.

Hope this has been helpful, and best to you,
Darr
 

Hausen

Active member
Yes David, that is exactly how I use this setup.



The only way to add a nodal slide on the E6H would be in the camera clamp in the arm and that is not adequate to center the lens. I would stay with what you have so you can continue to shoot with your shorter lens. A big difference between the RRS gimbal I had and the E6H is the horizontal rail on the RRS which allowed for horizontal movement.

Hope this has been helpful, and best to you,
Darr
Thanks Darr,

I went out for a play and I really like it. I have used my 120mm a lot but generally to shoot over something. The test shot attached is a pic I have taken a few times, at the lake at the end of my street, but the headlands in the background always appear a little to far away but using the tele gets my what I wanted. 9 x 1m exposures. `15000pixels square. I am a convert. I love this forum for being able to read a post like yours when I was ready for a change. Thanks again D AHTS.jpg
 

darr

Well-known member
Thanks Darr,

I went out for a play and I really like it. I have used my 120mm a lot but generally to shoot over something. The test shot attached is a pic I have taken a few times, at the lake at the end of my street, but the headlands in the background always appear a little to far away but using the tele gets my what I wanted. 9 x 1m exposures. `15000pixels square. I am a convert. I love this forum for being able to read a post like yours when I was ready for a change. Thanks again D View attachment 179167
That is a lovely "test" shot David. Oh the potential I see ... 👏
 
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