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Technical Camera Images

diggles

Well-known member
A couple of weeks ago I went to Nick Merrick's architectural photography workshop in Santa Fe. If you are unfamiliar with his work you can see it at https://www.hallmerrick.com/nm-projects, it's quite fantastic. He demo'd his process using a Phase One P45+ and Arca Swiss M-Line w/rotaslide. I took these images during the workshop. They were expecting us and left the lights on–SITE Santa Fe, a contemporary art space located in the Railyard Arts District. Architecture by Shop Architects

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (3 image stitch / 16:9 Format)
SITE Santa Fe by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 43XL (10mm Camera Fall)
SITE Santa Fe by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Canon 24mm TS-E II (5mm Camera Fall, 5mm Shift Left)
SITE Santa Fe by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (Yep, that's me! 10 second camera delay and about 10 tries to get it how I liked!)
SITE Santa Fe by Warren Diggles, on Flickr
 
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diggles

Well-known member
Here's another series of images from the workshop. These are from Algodones power plant in Algodones, New Mexico. This power plant is no longer functioning, but is commonly used as a movie set. Among others, scenes from one of the Terminator movies were filmed here and the episode of Better Call Saul I watched last night had a scene filmed here.

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (12mm 'ish Camera Fall)
Algodones Power Plant - Engineering by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL
Algodones Power Plant - Controls by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (7mm 'ish Camera Fall)
Algodones Power Plant - Windows by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + Hasselblad CFVII50c + Schneider APO-Digitar 43XL (5mm 'ish Camera Fall)
Algodones Power Plant - Abandoned Office by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Fuji GFX100s + GF 45mm
Algodones Power Plant - Air Intake by Warren Diggles, on Flickr
 
Great photos Warren. I took Nick's class a number of years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. He's a super nice guy and a huge wealth of knowledge on architectural photography. Funny story, the workshop assistant for your workshop accidentally sent me the Friday night dinner order. Somehow I got mixed up with the restaurant :)
 

diggles

Well-known member
Hey thank you Weldon!

Looking back at the workshop what stands out to me the most is Nick's energetic and enthusiastic teaching style. When demo'ing his working process, his excitement for making photographs is clear. He was shooting with his 8x10 camera in the Power Plant and was as happy to be there as we were.
 

guphotography

Active member
An outtake from a recent shoot, I couldn't resist the view from the terrace.

The high risers never interested me much, it is always the people, or the remanents of people that I found more interesting in pictures.

Cambo WRS 1600, 60XL, IQ1 100MP, 15mm shift each direction.

GSY_220810_base_building_0544_Panorama.jpg
 

rdeloe

Well-known member
With a bit of time to mess around, I thought it might be fun to see how a lens made for 6x8 film would do with a virtual 6x8 sensor. The lens is a Fujinon GX 125mm f/5.6 for the old Fuji GX680 system. I used my Toyo VX23D to flat stitch 9 GFX 50R images that together created a "virtual 6x8" sensor. The finished image file is quite large at 11,654 x 15,539 pixels.

I do like this old lens and its fun to give it a chance to see what it was designed to see -- a great big 6x8 image area. However, this isn't a very practical way to work. I can't imagine ever doing this in the field. It was hard enough indoors where I could do it a few times to get the composition right.

A 6x8 sensor image.jpg
 

diggles

Well-known member
Just got back from a short hiking/camping trip with my son and his family. Although Sprague Lake wasn't my first choice for a sunrise hike, our campsite was close and to my surprise everyone was up for it…Sprague Lake it is.

Pink clouds in the first image and pink mountains in the second.

Cambo WRS1600 + IQ4 150 + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL
Sprague Lake RMNP P0000374 by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + IQ4 150 + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (2 image stitch, 15mm right and left)
Sprague Lake RMNP P0000399 by Warren Diggles, on Flickr
 

jng

Well-known member
Just got back from a short hiking/camping trip with my son and his family. Although Sprague Lake wasn't my first choice for a sunrise hike, our campsite was close and to my surprise everyone was up for it…Sprague Lake it is.

Pink clouds in the first image and pink mountains in the second.

Cambo WRS1600 + IQ4 150 + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL
Sprague Lake RMNP P0000374 by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + IQ4 150 + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (2 image stitch, 15mm right and left)
Sprague Lake RMNP P0000399 by Warren Diggles, on Flickr
Nice images, Warren. You've made Dante very, very happy. :love:

John
 
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FloatingLens

Well-known member
Just got back from a short hiking/camping trip with my son and his family. Although Sprague Lake wasn't my first choice for a sunrise hike, our campsite was close and to my surprise everyone was up for it…Sprague Lake it is.

Pink clouds in the first image and pink mountains in the second.

Cambo WRS1600 + IQ4 150 + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL
Sprague Lake RMNP P0000374 by Warren Diggles, on Flickr

Cambo WRS1600 + IQ4 150 + Schneider APO-Digitar 60XL (2 image stitch, 15mm right and left)
Sprague Lake RMNP P0000399 by Warren Diggles, on Flickr
Warren, your post-processing is exquisite – besides the scene capturing with the camera, of course. Can you dive a bit into how you arrive at the tones and acuity in your uploaded pictures. My rescaled Flickr uploads never seem to be rendered as well as is the case with your files.

Perhaps you explained in another thread before, then please point me there. Cheers!
 

diggles

Well-known member
Warren, your post-processing is exquisite – besides the scene capturing with the camera, of course. Can you dive a bit into how you arrive at the tones and acuity in your uploaded pictures. My rescaled Flickr uploads never seem to be rendered as well as is the case with your files.

Perhaps you explained in another thread before, then please point me there. Cheers!
That's really nice of you to say and makes me feel like I'm making some progress–retouching definitely falls under the category of continuous improvement.

Since I've just switched from a Hasselblad to a Phase One back I'm still working on fine tuning my workflow. The basic color and exposure corrections in Capture One are great, but so far I'm struggling with the masking tools. The Adobe masking tools give me better control so I'm landing on a hybrid approach. Basic corrections in Capture One, then final edits in Photoshop/ACR.

At this point, my workflow follows this pattern:
  1. basic exposure and color adjustments in Capture One
  2. depending on the shot, I may make a clone with different white balance/exposure/hdr corrections and load both versions into a stack so I can blend them (e.g. sometimes the sky looks good at one color temperature and the foreground looks good at a different color temperature, same for contrast, same for exposure, etc.)
  3. choose edit files in photoshop (16 bit, no sharpening)
  4. once the files are in photoshop then I create smart objects (if there are multiple files then I use the photoshop stacking script and align layers first)
  5. for density and color correction I do as much as I can using the Camera Raw Filter adjustments, which is why I convert the layers to smart objects first. It's a work in progress, but the methods I use in Photoshop/ACR borrow heavily from what I've learned watching the video tutorials by Adam Gibbs [https://adamgibbs.com/] and Alex Noriega [https://www.alexnoriega.com/].) Adam Gibbs is more subtle and his editing process is quicker. Alex Noriega is more dramatic and his editing process has more steps. Both excellent in their own right. The following 10 steps are the gist of it, but I highly recommend watching the videos for the nuance. The videos I watched by Alex Noriega are his old ones, he is releasing new videos with updates to his process soon. I'll be getting those as soon as they come out. They're not free, but worth every penny in my opinion. HERE ARE THE STEPS:
    1. adjust in ACR, blend it, evaluate, repeat until satisfied. I usually start with white balance and exposure. I avoid contrast and use whites and blacks instead because those give me individual control over each end. Frequently I'll raise the shadows a bit as well. With multiple layers I use the same steps, but have the added complexity of making two layers blended together look natural (be sure to leave a little bit of room on both ends of the histogram for Photoshop adjustments)
    2. after ACR adjustments are made then it's all non-destructive adjustments using layers. The first step is to adjust shadow and highlights with curves and levels using masks created in the channels control panel (change layer blending mode to luminosity for these changes)
    3. then adjust color balance for shadows and highlights separately using masks created in the same way (change layer blending mode to color for these changes)
    4. find dark and light colors with curves to fix color shifts (sometimes this works beautifully, sometimes not)
    5. use hue/saturation to remove color contamination– usually excessive magentas, blues, cyans, and greens (this can make a big difference)
    6. create a retouch layer and use the spot healing tool and stamp tool with sample all layers selected
    7. use select color range and overlay/color burn blend mode color layers to enhance specific colors
    8. stamp visible and convert it to smart object
    9. make some minor tweaks in ACR if needed
    10. double check levels and add a linear contrast adjustment if needed
    11. done for now, until you look at it later and something else you don't like jumps out at you :D the good news is everything is non-destructive so you can go back and fix it, although you may have to redo your retouch layer if you want to redo something below it
  6. once I have my final.final file then I use the Web Resize v5 actions by alexnail.com for resizing images. He offers them as a free download on his website. The sharpening results I get from these actions are better than what I get using the export options in Capture One.
My goal is always to be nuanced at each level, but I have trouble having a clear vision of what I am trying to achieve ahead of time. Creating a mood is difficult for me. Generally, I feel like my results end up being a bit flat because I tend to process the contrast out in favor of getting details in the highlights and shadows. Even though I know better, I still do it!

Thank you again, and hopefully all of this helps!
 
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