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Z7 .. Z6 .. Z7 ..z6 ?

Paratom

Well-known member
I know the theoretic differences. For which reasons did you decide for either Z6 or Z7 and are you happy with your deicision?
 

Thorkil

Well-known member
I got the Z7 mainly because of it was first out. Perhaps I would wish for a higher unaffected iso-ability, but then perhaps not, because I got a superior ability of having large solid files, and cropping unaffected is no problem anymore, so I would stay here even if I could trade back with the full value for a Z6, with money back. The affected iso's differ from lightsituations to lightsituations, and the IBIS can do some rather good help even with a f4 lens. Even though, if you are book-keeper-minded looking for it, noise starts slowly after 1.000 iso, but on the other hand, you can also in some situations get away with 12.800iso and still get satisfied (it perhaps depend of the brain and the degree of the instant book-keeper-mindset, how critical you want to be).
So I don't regret. And I still really do like the Z7, and my thoughts by now still, is like keeping it for the rest of my life..
KR Thorkil
 

Darin Marcus

Well-known member
For the kind of photos I take, my D810 hits the sweet spot in terms of resolution and shooting technique (I prefer to handhold, for mobility). This is the main reason why I did not upgrade to the D850, and also why I did not go for the Z7. In addition, the better video capabilities of the Z6 (which I have not yet used other than for short tests) were an important reason. I am still happy with my choice. Although the Z6 has an AA filter, I am happy with the images I get from it. For more resolution I have a D810, for "old style" photography a Df with a Voigtlander prime, and for distant subjects a J5 with an 810mm reach (in FF equiv.) in a small and light combo :)
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
I have used both and compared certain images at base ISO. It's not as obvious as one would think. The Z6 will give you lower noise at higher ISO's simply due to the differences in pixel pitch. The "fatter pixels" would also yield better results with the Z6 for adapting Leica M lenses. The Z7's would be able to crop a bit better and maintain that resolution to a certain extent, but not a huge difference at normal viewing distances without cropping. When I applied a subtle, raw pre sharpener to the Z6 it was very close to the Z7. Yes, that's a trick to improve acuity, but at normal viewing distances it was virtually undistinguishable from the Z7. Also, remember that the higher resolution is less forgiving of bad technique, but far better with IBIS than their DSLR counterparts. So, why did I buy the Z7? It was because I got a really good deal on an OB Z7 from an NPS dealer and paid $1000 less than new. I do tend to crop and thought that to be an advantage for my style.

Images show two different days. One with 24-70mmf/4 on the Z7 and the other shot with the Nikon 50mm 1.2 AI-s at f5.6 (I think) Both are at 100 ISO. Z7 was at 70mm and the Z6 was at 50mm. So, which is which?
Lastly, the Z's are simply the best tool for using manual lenses, period!
 
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Photon42

Well-known member
I like the absence of the AA filter, low ISO and the high MP count of the Z7. Just as Thorkil I believe I will keep this thing for a very long time. It is incredible.
 

Darin Marcus

Well-known member
Why they out the AA filter in the Z6? I moiree a problem seen often in the Z7?
They probably found that FF sensors with lower pixel count (like the Z6) could show moire.
If I am not mistaken, all of Nikon's FF cameras without an AA filter have at least 36MP.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
They probably found that FF sensors with lower pixel count (like the Z6) could show moire.
If I am not mistaken, all of Nikon's FF cameras without an AA filter have at least 36MP.
Right, higher mp cameras don't show moire because of the denser array.
 

SrMphoto

Active member
They probably found that FF sensors with lower pixel count (like the Z6) could show moire.
If I am not mistaken, all of Nikon's FF cameras without an AA filter have at least 36MP.
Except for Leica-s, all FF 24Mp cameras have an AA filter. I prefer images from sensors without AA filter. While moire can be produced when the AA filter is omitted on 24Mp FF sensors, I have never encountered it (yet) in my photographs.
 

JohnBrew

Active member
I tried a Z7 w/24-70 for a week. I shot around a hundred images and got moire on two. Unfortunately I deleted them so can’t prove it here.
Any form with many lines or multiple repeating lines or squares can create moire. It can be dealt with in pp. And in many cases, moire that you see on your LCD or monitor will disappear when printed or enlarged.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
Except for Leica-s, all FF 24Mp cameras have an AA filter. I prefer images from sensors without AA filter. While moire can be produced when the AA filter is omitted on 24Mp FF sensors, I have never encountered it (yet) in my photographs.
Well, even with an AA filter on a 24 MP sensor you can get moire:

1:1 center crop:


It's usually the result of a well defined pattern in the subject together with a nice sharp lens.
The example above was shot with a Rokkor 45/2 prime, stopped down to f5.6
A very similar picture 1 min later with the 24-70/4 zoom didn't show any moire, but is also much less detailed

Only these are examples with a Sony A7ii and A7, but I don't have a Z6 or Z7 so I can't show any examples from those.
 

Paratom

Well-known member
I tried a Z7 w/24-70 for a week. I shot around a hundred images and got moire on two. Unfortunately I deleted them so can’t prove it here.
Any form with many lines or multiple repeating lines or squares can create moire. It can be dealt with in pp. And in many cases, moire that you see on your LCD or monitor will disappear when printed or enlarged.
Hi John,
so what is your conclusion about the Nikon Z7 in general?
 

Paratom

Well-known member
.....

Images show two different days. One with 24-70mmf/4 on the Z7 and the other shot with the Nikon 50mm 1.2 AI-s at f5.6 (I think) Both are at 100 ISO. Z7 was at 70mm and the Z6 was at 50mm. So, which is which?
Lastly, the Z's are simply the best tool for using manual lenses, period!
I cant tell a big difference. One has a yelloish tint. both look like they received a lot of sharpening for my taste. But both do show same level of detail to me. My guess would be second is Z7.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
The Z6 is the top one and only a small amount of "pre Raw" sharpening was applied and the sun creates more contrast. The Z7 on the bottom pic was SOOC. I think the Z6 would get more "keeper" images, simply because of the more forgiving sensor.
 

JohnBrew

Active member
Hi John,
so what is your conclusion about the Nikon Z7 in general?
It’s a winner!
IMO, it handles much better than the DSLR’s. Being able to zoom the viewfinder was huge for me as I like manual focus. Such a tough decision which would involve the sale of my D810. Haven’t tried the adapter for F lenses, though. While I could make the 24-70 work for me, and I would hope Nikon has a firmware update coming for the vignetting, the only lens which Nikon has released so far with which I am impressed is the 50 prime. While admitting that I rarely shoot a lens wider than a 50 and really don’t care for zooms as I believe them too compromised, I would hate to part with my 70-200/4. Going to the Z series in reality is going to an entirely new system. For me, I would rather try out a Leica adapter than mess with the F adapter. Too many decisions here so I would rather wait a while before doing anything.
After having a NEX-7 and swearing I would never touch another EVF, the Z7 has completely turned around my opinion.
And for some reason my computer had more trouble processing the raw files
than it had with my CFV-50c files. Which gave me pause to maybe investigate the Z6 closer. After all, it’s more about the subject and composition than megapixels, right? :D
 

Thorkil

Well-known member
Hi John
I would like to encourage you to try the FTZ Adapter, while you will find, as I did, that the slim FX 70-200/4 just work extremely perfect on the Z7.
So will other FX-lenses too, even though I haven't tried them all yet.
best
 

Paratom

Well-known member
Thank you guys for all the intersting experience regarding the Z6 and Z7.
Since I also own a higher resolution MF camera allready I decided to go for the Z6 (because of high ISO and video). Now I am curious how it works for me.
 

Ai_Print

Active member
I already know, love and work very well with the D850 for the high res end of things so it only made sense to get two Z6's.
 
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