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Zone focussing

spb

Well-known member
Is it possible on the GFX cameras to successfully zone focus like on a Leica (for example) which still has depth of field scale markings?

Looking at the forthcoming GFX 100S, there seems to be a possible in the EVF to put up a depth of field scale or a distance scale. This makes me believe it would be possible to zone focus much in the same way as with a Leica.
 

Shashin

Well-known member
I assume the implementation is the same as X-series cameras. Then the answer is yes. I would recommend using the scales for the usual way for calculating DoF, not the option to use 100% monitor view.
 
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spb

Well-known member
AM I correct that if I want to Hyperfocus at say F11, everything from 6 feet onwards, that I need to set on the lens the infinity symbol in line with F11 on the lens barrel?
 

Shashin

Well-known member
Fuji lenses don't have DoF scales, but the DoF scale can be seen in the EVF and LCD. But you are right, set the focus so that the DoF scale touches infinity for a given aperture.
 
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spb

Well-known member
Have I got this correct. This is showing the lens of a Leica Q2M. Ok so on the GFX I will see the DoF scale in the EVF. Hope that works, I have gotten quite fond of focussing this way for some images.

First image F8 set to Hyperfocal

hyperfocal.jpg
Second image set to F8, at 2 metres Zone focus
zone-focus.jpg
 

Shashin

Well-known member
I have no idea what the first is set to as it is beyond infinity.

The second is the usual way of setting the hyperfocal distance with the infinity mark at the aperture index on the DoF scale. The opposite index on the scale shows the near point of the DoF.
 
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spb

Well-known member
Thank you, so I have got it wrong in the first image and he terms mixed up. So the second image is Hyperfocal settings.
Thank you.

I have to re-learn about Zone focus as well.
 

biglouis

Well-known member
When I use hyperfocal distance on wide lenses, e.g. 21mm I normally just set the infinity mark to the centre as the normal dof is so large at, say, f5.6 and beyond it really doesn't matter. Hyperfocal becomes more relevant at narrower fields of view, e.g. 35mm upwards, in my experience.
 
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spb

Well-known member
Correct me if I am wrong Zone focus, is where one chooses an F stop say F8, then one aligns on the DOF scale F8 to a distance one wants, say 2 metres?

Hyperfocal on the other hand you align the infinity mark to the right side of the DOF markings at whatever F-stop has been chosen as lens aperture.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
In a way focussing at the hyperfocal distance is zone focussing from half the hyperfocal distance until infinity.

As soon as you focus closer as the hyperfocal distance you're zone focussing from a point closer to where you're focussing to a point behind where you're focussing.
If your lens has a dof engraving you can see the size of that zone (closest to furthest distance "in focus"), but there's also dof tables as well as smartphone apps that can tell you what the zone of "in focus" is exactly.
 

Rand47

Active member
Stating the obvious here, but might be worth it to the OP. On the GFX medium format you’ll have less apparent depth of field at any given aperture than the Leica Q or other 24x36mm sensor cameras. Often, with lenses other than the 23mm and 30mm wide angles, you may struggle to get adequate depth of field to cover your subject from near foreground to infinity. (Forgive me if this is all “old news” to you.) BUT, the GFX has focus stacking ability. One of the settings is “auto” and you select near point and far point and tell the camera to “go“ and it will shoot as many images as it needs. Stacking the files in something like Helicon Focus works very well. Often in landscape work, it will only need three or so images at optimum aperture. I use the EVF / LCD digital DoF scale to make an easy determination as to whether I’ll need to stack or not.

Rand
 
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spb

Well-known member
Rand47, thanks for the input, I haven't gotten my hands yet on the GFX 100S, but when I do I will investigate what you say here, having not really looked at focus stacking before. Could get interesting.
 
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