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Thread: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

  1. #51
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    I have a vague feeling that I am getting it so far, but I still don't feel nearly ready to buy anything yet. First I want to have a a beginning-to-end workflow in my head, at least loosely.
    Getting one of the intro to large format books will help with this as every one I have seen gives a good list of what you actually need to buy to get started and lays out a simple workflow.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Oh, for the Schneider lenses in Compur shutters, what cable release fitting do I need?

    Do I need grad filters? The shutter speed range seems kinda limited.
    A cable release fitting like this: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...e_Release.html

    If you have any old cable releases for manual 35mm cameras those would work.

    That is standardized across all LF lenses--except where it's not. Occasionally a lens in a large, older shutter (like an Ilex #5) may require a longer plunger throw to set off the shutter and there are some funky electric shutters, but those are exceptions.

    Grad or ND? I don't use grad filters for my work in any format, but have been using ND filters so I can shoot wide open during the day. For example, my 12" f/4.5 velostigmat is in a studio shutter which is basically "Bulb" only so I need to get my shutter speed down to around 1/2" second for me to be consistent with the exposures.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    cable releases are standard.

    75 is indeed wide. I use a 150 on 8x10 and it's most often almost too wide even for very wide scenes.

    Grads - Lee system is popular. Avoid glass grads - they are expensive and will break. Resin filters are optically equal but scratch easier.

    Shutter speeds - unless you shoot wide open, you'll find yourself in the 1/60 - 1 sec in daylight. Shutter speeds are fixed in steps, you do the fine adjustment in aperture.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    I find LF to be much more componentised than other formats.
    That's a feature, not a bug.

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    I mean, in what other formats do you need to talk about lens board manufacturers
    Most modern cameras adhere to one of a small number of lensboard standards. The most popular ones are Technika, Toyo field and Sinar, with smaller cameras overwhelmingly going with the Technika standard and larger ones with Sinar. Although it was Linhof that established the Technika standard, many other manufacturers make compatible boards at much lower prices. And there are grillions of used ones floating around. Adapter boards for fitting smaller lensboard types to larger ones are readily available too. It's just not a big deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    film holder manufacturers
    There are only two modern manufacturers of 4x5 holders - Fidelity/Lisco and Toyo. Actually, Fidelity/Lisco has already shut down, though there are still plenty of new holders in the pipeline, and lots of used ones available.

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    shutter manufacturers (!)
    Copal's the only one still selling new, and is by far the most common on modern lenses. Compur (less common) and Prontor (much less common) also turn up, but for most users there's no reason to go out of their way looking for one. OTOH, if a lens in, say, Compur, comes along at a decent price, there's equally no reason to avoid it. They all mount in the same standard sized lensboard holes.

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Oh, for the Schneider lenses in Compur shutters, what cable release fitting do I need?
    Late model shutters almost all accept the same inexpensive generic cable releases.

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Do I need grad filters? The shutter speed range seems kinda limited.
    Do you mean ND filters? Anyway, I can't recall ever using a shutter speed faster than 1/30 on a LF camera, even in the smaller formats like 4x5. The top speeds on the Copal shutters are way more than fast enough for all but highly specialized uses.

    BTW, lensboard and shutter standards do get more complicated as you move into classic/antique cameras and lenses. There are still straightforward solutions for most problems, and in any case that's not what you've been looking at for now.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Is the Schneider-Kreuznach 210mm f/5,6 APO-Symmar a good lens for 4x5 (enough coverage, etc)? What is a fair price for one?
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    Do you mean ND filters?
    Sorry, yes, I am getting tired here (it is after midnight and I have a 15-month-old daughter...) and messing up Thanks for the answer.
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Is the Schneider-Kreuznach 210mm f/5,6 APO-Symmar a good lens for 4x5 (enough coverage, etc)? What is a fair price for one?
    It's an excellent lens indeed, and well suited to 4x5 in every way. Price is a bit hard to judge - as I recall I paid something like $400 for mine, used in very clean condition, but you should check KEH and completed sales on eBay for a current sense.

    If budget is an issue, at least in the US you can generally find a clean 210 Symmar-S MC, Sironar-N MC, or Caltar II-N MC for $100 to $150 less than that. Those are great bargains.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Crikey that's cheap! I am used to APO lenses for my Leica Ms, and you could get a handful of Schneiders for a single Leica! I thought I would be robbed for a lens like that. I see one on eBay for $445 which judging by recent auctions is a bit too much, so I will watch for a while.

    Actually, that leads to another question: would I even see the difference on 4x5 between the APO and non-APO Symmar?
    Last edited by carstenw; 15th January 2010 at 15:17.
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Don't be impressed by the term "apo" on large format lenses. With respect to the main line plasmat lenses, in practical terms all it means is that the lens is of recent vintage. It's a marketing thing, not a major technology or quality distinction. All recent Schneider and Rodenstock plasmats are called "apo".

    In the 1980s, Rodenstock's plasmat line was called Sironar-N. Later, when they introduced the Apo-Sironar-S line with greater coverage, they kept the Sironar-N, but just renamed it Apo-Sironar-N without making any substantive change in the optical design.

    And it doesn't matter. These late-model lenses are all of very high optical quality for their respective intended formats.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Actually, that leads to another question: would I even see the difference on 4x5 between the APO and non-APO Symmar?
    From first-hand experience I know the Rodenstock lenses better than the Schneider. FWIW, the Symmar-S series is specified as covering 70 degrees, while the Apo-Symmar covers 72. But in either case, the 210 has more than ample coverage for 4x5. I don't have MTF curves for the Symmar-S series, but no doubt performance was refined slightly between the two generations. Most users in most circumstances will probably be hard-pressed to tell the difference.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    question the symmar-s series the 120 macro will focus to infinity as well correct? on 4X5

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by viablex1 View Post
    question the symmar-s series the 120 macro will focus to infinity as well correct? on 4X5
    Any large format lens will focus to infinity on any large format camera, so long as the lens can be mounted on a lensboard that will fit the front standard of the camera, and the minimum bellows extension of the camera is shorter than the flange focal distance of the lens.

    But the 120mm Makro-Symmar HM won't cover 4x5 at infinity. Also, it's optimized for use in the magnification range 1:4 - 4:1. A 120mm Symmar-S, Apo-Symmar or Apo-Symmar L would be a much better choice for general use on 4x5.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Another silly question, and I can already guess the nature of the answers, but boke: do APO lenses have less attractive/classic boke than pre-APO lenses? Here I am thinking of the Leica M lenses, where this is often, but not always the case, and I am thinking specifically of the 210mm f/5.6 APO-Symmar from Schneider, compared to its ancestors.
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    I am still mulling over the universal (or bag) bellows for the Chamonix 45. If I decide that I do need it later, I will pay a lot of shipping for it, so there is some incentive to think ahead here. It isn't that expensive either, if just considered as insurance for the future. I might at some point want to do some architectural photography, so perhaps at that point, with a 75mm or even 65mm or 47mm lens, it might come in handy to get significant movements.

    Does anyone think that this is silly or unnecessary?
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Another silly question, and I can already guess the nature of the answers, but boke: do APO lenses have less attractive/classic boke than pre-APO lenses? Here I am thinking of the Leica M lenses, where this is often, but not always the case, and I am thinking specifically of the 210mm f/5.6 APO-Symmar from Schneider, compared to its ancestors.
    You need to drop your Leica thinking, LF lenses are different.

    LF lenses being most often designed with a max aperture of f/5.6 - f/9, the design criteria are quite different than when making an f/1.4 lens, and resulting lenses as well.

    LF lens designs are fairly close to symmetrical, since there is no need for retrofocus design (no mirror box). This generally leads to good bokeh and little or no chromatic aberration.

    LF lenses are generally optimized to perform at f/11 - f22. Wider openings are not always useful because of the extremely narrow DOF. In 8x10 I often find myself using f/45, f/64, f/90, thereby actually sacrificing some resolution for DOF.

    So regarding bokeh, what you'll most often see is a neutral ("perfect" if you will) out of focus rendering with no artefacts. What you won't see on most lenses is "Leica glow" as these lenses most often are made to maximize resolving power.

    Another thing you'll notice is that even cheap old LF lenses have a resolving power that goes beyond anything else, if you take the entire image circle into account.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Another silly question, and I can already guess the nature of the answers, but boke: do APO lenses have less attractive/classic boke than pre-APO lenses? Here I am thinking of the Leica M lenses, where this is often, but not always the case, and I am thinking specifically of the 210mm f/5.6 APO-Symmar from Schneider, compared to its ancestors.
    If you can get a cheap Apo-Symmar then go for it. Symmar-S resolves less, and I believe is not multicoated. OTOH it is a convertible - you can remove the front element and get a longer focal length using the rear element.

    Some general links:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/
    http://www.thalmann.com/largeformat/
    http://www.viewcamera.com/
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    UOTE=carstenw;175016]I am still mulling over the universal (or bag) bellows for the Chamonix 45. If I decide that I do need it later, I will pay a lot of shipping for it, so there is some incentive to think ahead here. It isn't that expensive either, if just considered as insurance for the future. I might at some point want to do some architectural photography, so perhaps at that point, with a 75mm or even 65mm or 47mm lens, it might come in handy to get significant movements.

    Does anyone think that this is silly or unnecessary?[/QUOTE]

    Bingo! -- for that reason alone, I would get the universal bellow when you order the camera. As you point out, it's not that much more.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    .... I might at some point want to do some architectural photography, so perhaps at that point, with a 75mm or even 65mm or 47mm lens....
    Carsten - Hi, I somehow strayed here, but shot mostly view camera work for many years. A 75 would be a good wide lens for 5x4, and after Leica you will be amazed at the low price of some fabulous S/H large format lenses. All my lenses are in Prontor shutters because they are self-cocking, I prefer them to Copal for that reason, though they will not be common S/H.

    My widest lens is a Rodenstock 55mm Apo Grandagon [excellent] which I used a lot for architecture; on 6x9 it equates to an equivalent of 24mm on 35mm film but with lots of movement [the Apo Grandagon range were chosen by Hasselblad for their Arc Body camera]. Bear in mind that with wide angle L/F the use of a Centre Filter will likely be necessary to compensate for light fall off as you shift the image around the image circle, expect to lose around 2 stops of light to the C-Filter.

    Getting completely clean processing is a combination of craft, art, following wind, and voodoo; for that reason I stayed with 6x9 rollfilm as I had mastered it's processing. However, the 5x4 format has great allure.

    Many photographers paid dearly for their gear and are reluctant to sell for the low prices available to sellers so hang onto it instead. If you have contacts amongst older Pro photographers, try putting the word around about what you are looking out for - I'd not be surprised if photographers [like me] would have L/F gear they'd sell for a not-so-insulting offer and the guarantee of a good home. Just a thought.

    Me?. I downsized to Leica without regret and don't miss those ghastly chemicals one bit or the sinking dread of having to go into the darkroom for a long printing session when the sun is shining. [And that's part of why some great L/F gear is available for silly prices].

    Good luck.

    ................ Chris

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Thanks for the tips, Chris. I do not know any LF photographers around where I live, so I guess I will have to do it the hard way.

    What I have settled on so far are the following: Chamonix 45N-1 walnut, if I can find it, and either maple or teak if I cannot. I am not keen on the lightness of maple or the colour of teak, but I have to choose what I can get. 5 double-sided film holders. This is slightly less film than I typically shoot with MF, which seems appropriate. Possibly the bag bellows, to keep the option for wider lenses open for later, without having to pay a lot of shipping on top.

    Schneider Super Angulon 90mm f/5.6 (for brighter focusing in my typical environs) and APO Symmar 210m f/5.6.

    Some kind of 6x loupe, or thereabouts. I will re-read this thread when I ready to buy this.

    Jobo 3010 tank, and a motor for it (CPA-2, CPP-2, equivalent).

    ---

    I will be using my new Tenba Messenger Bag (large) to carry things around, my Pentax Digital Spotmeter to meter, my Gitzo GT3541XLS as tripod, as well as my Manfrotto 405 or possibly my RRS BH-55. I am not sure if I will be as frustrated by the BH-55 with LF as I was with MF, but if not, it is smaller and lighter to carry.

    That rounds it up so far. Did I miss anything obvious?
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Another topic is film. With MF I was using Adox CHS 25 or 50, as well as Tri-X, depending on the project.

    I am not sure how much grain I will like with 4x5, but I thought I would start with an ISO 100 film and see how that goes. I doubt I will need the extra-fine grain from ISO 25 or 50 films with such large negatives, and I do like to see just a touch of grain, although not too much for the types of projects I will be doing with this setup. I do not want to fiddle too much with development, at least initially, so I am looking for a film/developer combo which is fairly forgiving of temperature and development times, perhaps FP4+ in Rodinal or something like that.

    B&W only, for now. I am not even sure if I can find someone to develop colour for me, although I guess there must be something in a city of 4 million.

    What are the films that you folks use for 4x5/5x7?
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Hi Carsten,

    I use Kodak T-Max 400 developed in HC 110 and Fuji Acros 100 developed
    in D76. Not sure you know about http://grossformatfotografie.de/ there are
    for sure some Berlin LF shooters around.

    For film development, i use a Jobo TestDrum 2820. It takes six sheets
    of film and you can pretty much use it the same way like you do for MF.

    Have a good weekend,
    Ralf

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Carsten, just one other minor point on lens selection that hasn't been raised, and it has to with color cast when shooting color films. If you want more precise color rendering between lenses, stick with the more current brands and stay within brand, like get all Nikkor or all Schneider. Actually, late Schneider and Rodenstock render color almost identically (and very neutral) so you could mix those and be okay. Older Schneider generally leaned toward warm (yellow), older Fuji tended toward magenta, and older Rodenstock and Nikkor tended to run cool. Not a big issue for B&W, but definitely a condsideration when shooting a series in color...

    My favorite lenses toward the end, were late model Schneider's -- VERY uniform in rendering between focal lengths and designs, and of course very sharp, but still with a smoothness I liked.

    If you want a more classic look like older Mandler Leica glass, look to get some of the older Tessar design LF lenses, preferably single coated.
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Given that I am pretty decided on the 210mm f/5.6 APO Symmar, does the (older?) Schneider 90mm f/5.6 Super Angulon make a good match then?

    I understood from your previous comments that the f/6.8 90mm was not such a great lens, being a bit older and softer, and I find myself thinking that f/8 might be a tad dark for focusing since I often shoot in the shade on dim, overcast days. Am I off in my thinking here? Are there other options which fit well with the APO Symmar 210mm?
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Ralf, I will see if I can hook up with some others once I start getting the bits and pieces collected. Thanks for the tip!
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Carsten,

    It was the coating changes that signaled the first Schneider "APO" designation, and after then they pretty much all will match color-wise. Super Angulons are relatively new designs, but the earliest versions did unfortunately have the older, more yellow coating. Fortunately, almost all these first ones had silver front barrel noses -- so if you get a black-nosed SA, you are probably 99% safe. However, if you get one marked "MC" or "Super Multicoated" it is recent and you are 100% safe

    PS: There is another reason many older lenses (manufactured in the 50's through early 70's), LF or otherwise, generate yellow casts. It has to do with containing elements that used thorium oxide glass, which happens radioactive -- yes, really. Over time, the radioactivity actually yellowed the glass. I have read claims where folks cleared the glass by exposing it to strong UV radiation for a few days, but bottom line is I personally would stay away from lenses that look predominantly yellow as you look through them towards a white surface...
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    If you can get a cheap Apo-Symmar then go for it. Symmar-S resolves less, and I believe is not multicoated. OTOH it is a convertible - you can remove the front element and get a longer focal length using the rear element.
    The Symmar series was convertible, but that feature went away with the Symmar-S series. Most Symmar-S lenses are multicoated, though the very earliest ones are not. The biggest leap in bench-test performance was probably going from Symmar to Symmar-S.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Another silly question, and I can already guess the nature of the answers, but boke: do APO lenses have less attractive/classic boke than pre-APO lenses? Here I am thinking of the Leica M lenses, where this is often, but not always the case, and I am thinking specifically of the 210mm f/5.6 APO-Symmar from Schneider, compared to its ancestors.
    Not necessarily, and sometimes the newer lenses are better than the old.

    There are differences in bokeh even among late-model plasmats, though they won't be apparent in many situations, and many users won't care about them even when they're present.

    My own favorite in this respect is Rodenstock, especially the current Apo-Sironar-S series, though the (Apo-)Sironar-N is very similar. The earlier plain Sironars are a different animal - there was a big change (for the better, IMO) between the Sironar and the Sironar-N generation.

    After that I'd pick the Apo-Symmars (I've never used an Apo-Symmar L), with Fujinons and Nikkors last.

    Afraid I'm less familiar with the subtleties of the different Schneider generations, though I'm sure they're there - Symmars look different to me compared to Apo-Symmars, though I don't know the Symmar-S generation well enough to say when the change occurred. With that caveat, I prefer the Apo-Symmar rendering to the Symmar.

    I should add that you can't really take someone else's word on this aspect of optical behavior - it's the sort of thing that's so subjective that only you can judge whether the differences matter and if so, what will be best for your tastes and purposes. You just need to plunge in somewhere, gain some experience, and try different brands and generations within brand for yourself. Or if you like the lens you buy initially, and you're not too exercised about this sort of thing and just want to leave well enough alone, that's fine too.
    Last edited by Oren Grad; 16th January 2010 at 09:13.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    The 90mm f/5.6 is a big lens with an 82mm front filter ring size, fyi.

    I'd suggest looking at the 90mm f/6.8 Grandagon (67mm filter ring) if you want something brighter than f/8, but still a reasonably sized lens.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Do you suggest this just because of the size? The weight is only about 200g different. Yes, some lenses weigh only 200g, but I am used to heavy lenses, and plan on just the two, so if they together weigh about a kilo, no problem. Is the lens really so much larger? I am having trouble finding specs on the non-XL lens...
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    If I can get my friend's f/6.8 I'll photograph them next to each other as I have the non-XL f/5.6 Super Angulon and he has the Grandagon f/6.8. I personally much prefer the Grandagon (and am planning on getting one at some point) just based on the size of the lens and I don't see as big of a difference from f/6.8 -> f/5.6 as you do going from f/8 -> f/6.8.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    I've used f/6.8 wideangles (65 Grandagon pre-N I think, and a 65 f/8 Horseman) and they get very dark when focusing. Part of the problem is the oblique angle of the light hitting the ground glass. If you find this to be a problem then look into getting a fresnel lens to mound behind the ground glass. This will condensate the light exiting the groundglass a bit, so it's easier to see the entire image when using a wideangle lens.

    With long lenses OTOH it's not a problem. I had a Fujinon-A 240 f/9 for a while and it was delightful to use on 4x5. A 210 Apo-Symmar will be rediculously bright and easy to focus.
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    I am trying to plan bags, while letting the f/5.6 vs. f/6.8 issue simmer in the back of my head, and would like to know the dimensions of the Chamonix collapsed. Unfortunately, they are not available on the website, and I don't find them anywhere else. Does anyone have them handy?

    Lars, that is interesting about the angle of incidence and perceived darkness while focusing. The Chamonix comes with a Fresnel inserted, although it is removable. With the 45N-1 there are supposedly some potential focus accuracy issues with the Fresnel present, but the 45N-2 is meant to be fixed... How much difference does a Fresnel make to perceived brightness?
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    They aren't in Jack's review? I thought he'd given those numbers.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    They aren't in Jack's review? I thought he'd given those numbers.
    I was wrong, but you can see them here from Hugo:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...26&postcount=5

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    If considering the Schneider Super Angulon 90mm f/5.6, is it also worth considering the Rodenstock Grandagon-N 90mm f/4.5? It is just 40g heavier, but a bit more compact. What are these worth used?
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Thanks, Jeremy! More compact than I thought, which bodes well for my existing bag
    Carsten - Website

  37. #87
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    Any large format lens will focus to infinity on any large format camera, so long as the lens can be mounted on a lensboard that will fit the front standard of the camera, and the minimum bellows extension of the camera is shorter than the flange focal distance of the lens.

    But the 120mm Makro-Symmar HM won't cover 4x5 at infinity. Also, it's optimized for use in the magnification range 1:4 - 4:1. A 120mm Symmar-S, Apo-Symmar or Apo-Symmar L would be a much better choice for general use on 4x5.
    thanks for that I really appreciate that, now I have good information,

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    IMHO the Schneider 110XL would complement well the 210mm. It takes 67mm filter, weigh 425g, and is very sharp.
    Regarding bellows, I have both the universal and the bag. The bag bellow makes movements much easier with my 72mm and the 47mm.

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    I think the 110mm XL is too new for me, and too expensive. It looks like the price is at least twice of the most expensive lenses mentioned in this thread, even used.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Yep the 110 SSXL is highly appreciated. I've been looking for a good deal on a used one for years, to no avail.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Well, I am heading off the deep end: I just listed a bunch of items I don't use any more on the B&S forum, including my Hartblei Super Rotator for Contax Hopefully this will offset the cost of the 4x5 system.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    ...... How much difference does a Fresnel make to perceived brightness?
    Carsten - In the case of my Linhof Technikardan's screen; it made the difference between making the camera usable and sometimes unusable [and that's with F5.6 lenses and less]. I can't remember which fresnel I eventually opted for but it made a huge difference in my case [not all fresnels are equal, so take considered advice].

    Another 'and another thing'; setting up a view camera with wide angle lens to photograph architecture can sorely test your tripod head. Too many tripod heads 'creep' when you tighten them [I wasted money on one designated as a 'large format head' which did that] - it can drive you fairly crazy. My number one piece of purchasing advice is to get a geared head so you can make the micro adjustments necessary with architectural work; it can really speed up set-up time.

    ............. Chris

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    would you consider given an idea of a good geared head?

    thanks

    MAtto

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Chris, I am currently using the Manfrotto 405, so I hope I will be okay there.
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Chris, I am currently using the Manfrotto 405, so I hope I will be okay there.
    Carsten

    Your move into 4x5 photography reminds me very much of my own way into 4x5 many years ago .
    This includes all mentioned workflow steps .

    I was using the MANFROTTO 405 , found it good , but decided for the ARCA SWISS CUBE because of te bulky design and weight of the 405 head .

    In the meantime , I have given up my 4x5 darkroom , because I suffered too much , standing all day .
    My MICRTEK ATRIXSCAN F1 scanner solved that problem .

    I am still using my ARCA SWISS with RODENSTOCK lenses APO-SIRONAR 100 , 135 , 180 and 240 mm .

    Good luck for your 4x5 work .

    Jürgen

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Thanks Jürgen! I will be using the 405 until I can afford a Cube One day that will come. I develop myself and will also scan, at least for now.

    The bleeding has started. I sold some camera bags and am selling some lenses (see B&S), and sadly I missed a nice lens in Germany on eBay by a few minutes, while stupidly chatting with someone. Instead, I went for the $445 Apo-Symmar 210mm f5.6 I mentioned earlier. A bit too high, but not too much, and I don't see any others coming up. It is in very good condition from a seller with very good ratings, so I bit the bullet.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    The Stroebel book arrived. I see what people mean, it is very encyclopedic, rather than tutorial in nature. I will start studying it tonight and see how I get along with it.
    Carsten - Website

  48. #98
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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Good luck using 4x5", I find it to be very enjoyable. Though you know how it is, once you go 4x5"... You'll only want bigger!

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Yes, but 8x10 is really too large for a shoulder bag, and I have no car, so there are natural limits to how large a format I can aspire to. 5x7 might work though...
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: LF (4x5) Newbie Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    ... I have no car, so there are natural limits........
    Wow - Carsten; what an admission. And for what it's worth I don't either, I've always worked from a touring bike and it amazes me how much gear I used to cycle with.

    ......... Chris

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