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Thread: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

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    Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    I recently bought a Linhof Master Technika, but for a while I lacked various things to be able to take it out and use it in earnest. Yesterday I finally took the opportunity to use it to further my current long-term project on Berlin Cemetaries. I am still missing a darkcloth, so I grabbed a stretchy black t-shirt and headed out.

    I was recently in the Friedhof der Dorotheenstädtischen und Friedrichswerderschen Gemeinden (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedho...chen_Gemeinden) with my Hasselblad 2000FC/M and found that the square format, however much I love using it in other situations, was not well suited to this project. Furthermore, the NC-2 prism did not give me a low enough angle to be able to raise my tripod, and finally, it seems not to work quite right on Bulb, causing me to massively overexpose the final shot on the roll, probably also the best shot, so I was determined to return and continue where I left off.

    I took the Linhof Master Technika, the Schneider 90mm f/5.6 Super-Angulon Linhof Select and 210mm f/5.6 APO-Symmar, my Pentax Digital Spotmeter and 5 Fidelity film holders, as well as the Gitzo GT3541XLS with Burzynski Ball Head II. Omitting the camera which is described in detail below, all of this worked flawlessly.

    I had fooled around with the movements in my apartment, but not really used them in anger, so this was a test of fire for both the camera and myself. I would have to see if all I had been reading had stuck well enough for me to use it in the field.

    I started straight back at the spot where the Hasselblad failed, but a woman was sitting next to the grave, arguing on her cellphone, so rather than interrupt, I went to look for my second shot, to do that first.

    I found a small mausoleum and started setting up. In fact the shot was dead straight-forward, and didn't even require rise, so I was done within a quick 15 minutes or so... This time was to drop throughout the day, the longer setup times being reserved for the more complicated shots with lots of movements, and shots with no movements being done in just 2-3 minutes or so.

    Working with the Linhof Master Technika takes a bit of practice, but is then quite straight-forward, although it does require the occasional hoop-jump to get around its limited shift with wide-angle lenses, for example. I would typically drop the gear on the ground where I was considering a shot, and then walk around, trying to visualize the shot first. I don't yet have a frame, nor do I have the Linhof Multifocus Viewfinder, for obvious reasons: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...239/kw/LIFMF45

    Hence I was just working with my naked eyes, but visualizing this way with a new camera and two focal lengths you are not familiar with is not easy. Still, apart from one shot, I pretty much always ended up setting up where I initially thought it the best.

    Here is an early shot with the 210mm. In the photo are just the statue and the grave next to it covered with ivy, tightly framed. I used swing to get both in focus and shot at perhaps f/22 to get sufficient DoF.

    Attachment 29521

    At the start of the day, I played around a bit, and then put the camera on the tripod, opened it, and removed the folding viewer (which is useless). Between shots I just collapsed the tripod a little, loosened the pan lock, picked up the lot and schlepped it on my shoulder. For each shot, I then followed the following procedure:

    - Set tripod to roughly the right height.
    - If I was using the 90mm, push the rail back to the rear position, and flip up its infinity stops.
    - Place the front standard at the correct infinity stops, and mount the lens, if not already done.
    - Put the T-shirt neck around camera, and while looking through, get the camera aimed right.
    - Decide if I need movements, and if so, perform them.
    - Check framing and iterate if necessary.
    - Check critical focus.
    - Measure light and set up lens.
    - Shoot.

    It sounds more involved than it was. The only part which was not smooth and fast was setting movements, which on the Master Technika, while not a complete afterthought, was not the primary motivating factor in the design the way it is on an Ebony 45SU, for example.

    If I used movements on a shot, it was typically a combination of rear tilt/swing and front tilt/swing. I used no front rise this time (the MT has no fall, although I could have used it), and the only time I could have used shift, I had the 90mm on the camera, and the rise arm hit the camera lid's brace, so I had to improvise with rear/front swing.

    Front rise and tilt are easy to set, but shift and swing are a bit stiff. Rear tilt and swing are quite stiff, and it is somewhat difficult to get the back unlocked. I hope that the camera loosens up a bit with use, especially the rear "standard" locks, which could be quite frustrating to operate. On the bright side of things, all movements zero positively.

    I found that when I applied noticeable movements with a somewhat distant subject (5-10m) while using the 90mm, I had to back the front standard away from the infinity stops to be able to focus. I am very glad I chose to have the 90mm mounted on a Linhof Comfort board, which is a recessed board with easy-to-reach controls for everything so I don't have to stick my sausages into the recessed part of the board. Having the recessed board made it easier to work with the lens and front movements from under the T-shirt.

    Here is a shot with the 90mm from later in the day when I was getting used to things. The cross, plaque and leaning gravestone were all in the shot.

    Attachment 29522

    At the end of the day, I was working fairly fluidly with the camera, except as noted below.

    The things which work well with the MT for my uses are:

    - Quick initial setup.
    - Good positive feedback while focusing.
    - Tough clamshell design.
    - Positive zeroing of all movements.
    - Quick tear-down.
    - Solid locks everywhere.
    - Works well with 90mm-210mm lenses and beyond.
    - All controls can be operated blind from under the darkcloth, although front shift and swing were a bit tricky.
    - Lens apertures can be stopped down from under the cloth, for DoF checking.
    - Quick release coupling for cable release on both lens boards (true Linhof).

    The things which are less positive of for me are:

    - Shift/rise with 90mm a bit constrained.
    - No front fall (no big deal; use drop bed or point camera down and tilt).
    - Stiff movements to some extent.
    - No rear rise/fall/shift (no big deal, use front).
    - Combined rear tilt and swing with limited angle.
    - Heavy (although not different from an advanced Ebony).

    Things I would change for next time:

    - Bring a frame to visualize with, or get the Multifocus finder.
    - Bring a proper darkcloth (I am trying to order one, unsuccessfully so far).
    - Consider swapping the 90mm for a 75mm and add a middle focal length.

    The things I would definitely look for in a future camera, if I keep feeling the same way as I did yesterday, are more tilt/swing front and rear, freer-moving adjustments and maybe lighter weight. The things I would miss if I moved to a different kind of camera would be strong closed state, positive zeroing and the nice, tight feeling everywhere.

    There are a few parts of the camera which feel like they might cause problems if abused, such as the focus lock, the rise/fall gear mechanism and the flap. The rest of the camera is pretty much indestructible.

    I will add to this thread as I think of things I missed. Feel free to comment or give me tips.
    Carsten - Website

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    lilmsmaggie
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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    The things I would definitely look for in a future camera, if I keep feeling the same way as I did yesterday, are more tilt/swing front and rear, freer-moving adjustments and maybe lighter weight. The things I would miss if I moved to a different kind of camera would be strong closed state, positive zeroing and the nice, tight feeling everywhere.

    There are a few parts of the camera which feel like they might cause problems if abused, such as the focus lock, the rise/fall gear mechanism and the flap. The rest of the camera is pretty much indestructible.

    I will add to this thread as I think of things I missed. Feel free to comment or give me tips.
    Hang in there Carsten. Practice makes perfect (or something like that)

    BTW - Carnac the Magnificent says he see's a Chamonix in your future

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Wow, 99 views and 1 reply. I think I am setting a new record here I wonder why?

    Anyway, don't worry, I am going to keep working this way for quite a while before changing lenses or camera. I was just putting down my thoughts uncensored. I did enjoy it quite a bit. I must say though, and I forgot to add this to the above post, I am really happy I bought f/5.6 lenses. Focusing and composing on a dark screen, and even f/5.6 is very dark compared to what I am used to, is definitely an acquired skill.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    carsten, you are bringing back some memories...

    sometimes the bellows can restrict movements, especially with a 90mm lens and farther subjects. I used the bag bellows to deal with this.

    a loupe is quite useful to nail gg focus, as is a proper dark cloth (i used to have a very nice one from Zone VI, white exterior, black interior, weights in the corners)

    incident meter readings as well as spot are helpful

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Interesting read Carsten.

    So knowing what you know now, is the Linhof the right camera for your project? It seems like 4x5 shooters go through a few bodies in the 'early days'.

    I have seen a technika being used with a reflex finder, it was quite compact. It would save the fumbling under a dark cloth but i wonder do they detract from the ground glass viewing experience as you go from binocuar viewing to monocular with the reflex finder (the one i saw only had one eyepiece). It would certainly be cheaper than the linhof multifocus finder!

    What film are you shooting on? Processing it yourself?

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    John, the bellows don't restrict movements with the 90mm, the clamshell of the camera does though. There isn't really any true way around this, although being creative with tilt/swing front and rear does help. I have a Rodenstock 4x loupe, which appears to be enough, since I can see the "grain" of the ground glass quite clearly. I have ordered the Light&Land darkcloth, since they are closer than the American companies selling ones like the BTZS stuff and so on:

    http://www.lightandland.co.uk/articl...peId=2&conId=8

    Incident metering can be helpful, yes, but I don't want to carry the Pentax Digital Spotmeter *and* my Gossen Profisix I have had good luck with metering so far, in this project, and I have ready (repeat) access to my subject, so I think I should be okay. Thanks for the comments.

    Aaron, thanks! I don't yet know whether the Linhof is right, but the price was low enough that I can resell without a loss, I hope, and it is a neat object, so I thought I would give it a whirl. If I do decide to sell it and get the Chamonix or an Ebony (the two most likely replacements), it will likely be because of restrictions on movements with the 90mm, and limited movements in general. I have hit the limits on *some* of the movements already, even on my first day, but I have not been unable to get a shot yet, so let's see. The lighter weight of the Chamonix would also be helpful, although not strictly necessary, at least for this project.

    The reflex finder doesn't really appeal to me, to be honest. It is somewhat bulky, and how do you achieve critical focus as accurate as with a 4x loupe? The Multifocus I want just for visualizing before I set up the camera, i.e. I would just carry it in my pocket, not mounted on the camera.

    I shoot Adox CHS 100, and develop myself, although I haven't yet started with LF development. On MF I shot Adox CHS 25 and 50, but I thought that the extra resolution of LF would let me get away with a fast film I am still missing a motor base for my Jobo 3010. The Beseler appears to be popular in the States, but I have not found one here yet. I am open to suggestions. I prefer buying from Germany or England, or France in a pinch (those are the languages I am able to get by in). Buying from the States has a lot of hidden costs and delays, so I try to avoid it if possible.

    I also need some way of drying the negatives. I might pick up a plastic container deep enough, and customize it, similar to Michael Gordon in his 4x5 pyro development video:

    http://michaelegordon.wordpress.com/...development-2/
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    John, the bellows don't restrict movements with the 90mm, the clamshell of the camera does though. There isn't really any true way around this, although being creative with tilt/swing front and rear does help. I have a Rodenstock 4x loupe, which appears to be enough, since I can see the "grain" of the ground glass quite clearly. I have ordered the Light&Land darkcloth, since they are closer than the American companies selling ones like the BTZS stuff and so on:

    http://www.lightandland.co.uk/articl...peId=2&conId=8

    Incident metering can be helpful, yes, but I don't want to carry the Pentax Digital Spotmeter *and* my Gossen Profisix I have had good luck with metering so far, in this project, and I have ready (repeat) access to my subject, so I think I should be okay. Thanks for the comments.

    Aaron, thanks! I don't yet know whether the Linhof is right, but the price was low enough that I can resell without a loss, I hope, and it is a neat object, so I thought I would give it a whirl. If I do decide to sell it and get the Chamonix or an Ebony (the two most likely replacements), it will likely be because of restrictions on movements with the 90mm, and limited movements in general. I have hit the limits on *some* of the movements already, even on my first day, but I have not been unable to get a shot yet, so let's see. The lighter weight of the Chamonix would also be helpful, although not strictly necessary, at least for this project.

    The reflex finder doesn't really appeal to me, to be honest. It is somewhat bulky, and how do you achieve critical focus as accurate as with a 4x loupe? The Multifocus I want just for visualizing before I set up the camera, i.e. I would just carry it in my pocket, not mounted on the camera.

    I shoot Adox CHS 100, and develop myself, although I haven't yet started with LF development. On MF I shot Adox CHS 25 and 50, but I thought that the extra resolution of LF would let me get away with a fast film I am still missing a motor base for my Jobo 3010. The Beseler appears to be popular in the States, but I have not found one here yet. I am open to suggestions. I prefer buying from Germany or England, or France in a pinch (those are the languages I am able to get by in). Buying from the States has a lot of hidden costs and delays, so I try to avoid it if possible.

    I also need some way of drying the negatives. I might pick up a plastic container deep enough, and customize it, similar to Michael Gordon in his 4x5 pyro development video:

    http://michaelegordon.wordpress.com/...development-2/

    Carsten,

    It has been a while but I have had three Linhof MT in my past...wonderful camera that will make you work for your images. I know that many develop an intimate knowledge of the camera like John Sexton...you will have to put in a number of hours to get comfortable with the camera.

    With regards to the 90...plan on being very comfortable with drop bed...only way to avoid vignetting on the film. Once you get used to it it will be second nature. Hard to see in the upper corners with any loupe and it is suprising the number of times it looked ok on the groundglass but you missed the vignette by a little bit.

    The View Camera store used to sell a great set of tubes for 4x5 processing in water baths...could do 4x5 5x7 and I believe 8x10...obviates the need for a motor base and is very cheap. Works great.

    http://www.viewcamerastore.com/produ...products_id=36

    Incident metering and spot are found in the newer Sekonic meters...Camerawest has my old 508 at $350 USD which is LN. I now have the newer Sekonic. However why not spot the grass in the cemetary and place it at Zone 5 or 4.5....same reading usually as an incident meter will give you.

    Once you bond with the MT it will be hard to consider other LF cameras in 4x5 format...perhaps the MT 3000 which addresses the difficulty in focusing the wider format lenses. It is rigid compact and fairly rugged.

    Look forward to seeing your results.

    Bob

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Hello Bob, and thanks for the comments and tips.

    The problem with the tubes is that I do not have an extra sink. I don't have a darkroom, and the kitchen has just two small sinks, one of which I use to keep the chemicals at the right temperature, and the other one of which I use to dump. The motor base is meant to be cheap anyway, I just need to find one.

    I am very fond of the Pentax Digital Spotmeter, and don't find myself needing an incident meter to get correct readings, so I think I will just keep going this way.

    This does bring up a point which I had meant to ask. I do use a light-duty scheme based on the zone system, but I am missing a bit: how wide are the zones? IIRC Zone VI used to put a zone scale directly on modified Pentax Digital Spotmeters, but doesn't that imply that all films have zones of the same width, i.e. the same contrast? I used to think a zone was just one stop wide, but clearly that is capable of being manipulated.

    I think I need to sit down and read Ansel Adams' The Negative again.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Thanks Carsten.

    I have been looking at picking up a Technika myself, hence the interest in your progress. They look like an engineering masterpiece but i guess every tool takes time to master.

    Your experiences with wide lens is informative. Would swapping the 90mm for a 75mm not increase your difficulty with the clamshell design though?

    Your link to the Michael Gordon video is great! I assume with Jobo gone under now those drums will cost their approximate weight in gold.

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    I picked up a Jobo 3010 for something like 135 Euro, second-hand. They often cost more, but around here you do not have to wait too long for a deal like that.

    The 75mm would be roughly the same as the 90mm, in that shift and rise are restricted, and you have to rely a lot more on tilt and swing, front and rear, to get the required movements. It works, but clearly this isn't the strength of this camera. The 75mm would just be that little bit wider though, which I would find handy, I think.

    Anyway, for now, no changes, just usage.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    as i recall: by definition, a zone is one stop; what varies with the mix of illumination, exposure, developer, development and emulsion is the range of zones you can differentiate and just where your metered zone V falls in those developed ranges

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Stop per zone is correct middle gray at V.

    Most of the BTZS and zone adherents would test each film to ascertain development times and curves so they knew exactly where to place the zone values with respect to the particular emulsion/developer combination.

    Try to locate Beyond the Zone System or the View Camera Store newsletters or back issues of Photo Techniques magazine...good discussions there and on the Large Format group concerning exposure and development.

    In lieu of the Multifinder program a lot of LF photographers are carrying a small P&S with zoom that matches their lens selection for the LF camera...previsualize and quick capture of exposure values that can be fine tuned with the Pentax as desired.

    Bob

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Michael Gordon's reference to the film drying box worked out well for me- so simple and cost-effective. I should have thought of that earlier myself

    Thanks for sharing your impressions. I used to have a Wista SP, which was built like a tank but heavy. Finally sold it and got a Chamonix- easiest weight loss I've ever had!

  14. #14
    Jack Spratt
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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    The Master Technika was my favorite LF camera out of the 10 or 12 I've owned. It's a great camera. A couple comments about your posts.

    You seem very concerned with using shift. I almost never used shift on my Master Technika or its predecessor, a Technika V. Unless you're in a confined space it's about as easy to just move the tripod as it is to use shift (and a whole lot easier than using tilt and swing to achieve the effects of shift). Moving the tripod also keeps the center of the lens aligned with the center of the film. When you use front shift you start using the edges of the lens to make the photograph and the edges of some lenses tend to be less sharp than the center area.

    With respect to dropping the bed when using your 90mm lens, you need to drop the bed to avoid having the front of the bed in the picture with a 90mm lens only when the back is in vertical orientation. With horizontal you don't need to drop the bed. And even in vertical, you often can avoid the need to drop the bed by cranking front rise up a notch or two.

    You mention possibly replacing the Technika with a Chamonix or an Ebony. I've owned a 4x5 Chamonix and an Ebony SVTe. This isn't the place to compare the three cameras but FWIW I much preferred the Technika (and the Chamonix) to the Ebony and mildly preferred the Technika to the Chamonix. Obviously this is a matter of personal preference. But even the best wooden camera (and those are two of the best) isn't the equal of a good metal camera in terms of precision and stability.

    You also mention perhaps getting a multi-focus finder. I had one (the newer version). I didn't care much for it, a simple viewing card was an easier and far far less expensive alternative for me. The multi-focus finder is actually designed for use with the rangefinder, it wasn't designed to be used simply as an aid to composition which is how most people use it today. I found it cumbersome to carry around and awkward to use (the older versions with their slider are actually easier to use).

    Someone mentioned the book "Beyond The Zone System." I spent a lot of time studying that book and also took a one week workshop from the author, the late Phil Davis. That's an excellent book but it's quite complicated and I wouldn't recommend it as an introduction to the zone system. I'd suggest Ansel Adams' book "The Negative" and its chapters on the zone system. Or Fred Picker's book, "Zone VI Workshop" (out of print but occasionally comes up on ebay).

    In the zone system, one zone is always one stop. In a small nutshell, you place the darkest important shadow area in the scene on the zone you want (usually III or IV), use your meter to check the zone on which the brightest important highlight then falls, and base your development time on whatever that zone is. A Pentax Spotmeter, especially when you add the little circular zone sticker that Calumet used to sell and may still sell, is a great meter for using the zone system.

    Well, I've gone on much longer than I expected. Good luck with your camera, it's a great camera and I think with a little practice you'll enjoy using it.

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Hi Carsten,
    After 2 Master Technikas, 2 Technars, and now 100% using ... a Linhof 2000 I would like to tell you quickly ... what I have always used with Linhofs since 1989.
    A Linhof lupe. Difficult to fine it is actually a Schneider loupe with a Linhof name.
    The optical glass is superb, and the image is bright. The only drawback, or rather shortcoming is that it is 8X ..... 10 power would be better, ....but it should be compact! ... the Schneider is.
    * (Edmund Scientific makes a good inexpensive, 10X adjustable loupe)
    Never have used a darkcloth. Always seemed to hot in sun .... hard to control in wind. I have always used a Linhof 4 way viewer, compact, quick.
    p.s. You are really really lucky to have a Schneider 90 5.6 ( I have and love the same lens)
    lucky because;
    If you had a 90 Rodenstock 4.5 you would be shackled with having to use it on a flat board because no one has made a recessed #1 board since the 135 3.5 Zeiss Sonnar of the 60's.
    (Linhofs come often with Rodenstock lenses because they share the same importer.)
    Try raising the front standard with a 90 #1 shutter lens, mounted on a flat board ........ good luck !
    I found using the Linhof simply gets better the more you use it. Mistakes are costly which speeds up the learning process.
    Your other lens, the 210 Apo Symmar is a superb lens which I use regularly.
    Hey,
    You have the Rolls Royce of 4x5 cameras. ( .... and no matter what anyone says,
    The world ends at 4x5 ....)
    Have fun!
    Rafael

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Spratt View Post
    The Master Technika was my favorite LF camera out of the 10 or 12 I've owned. It's a great camera. A couple comments about your posts.

    You seem very concerned with using shift. I almost never used shift on my Master Technika or its predecessor, a Technika V. Unless you're in a confined space it's about as easy to just move the tripod as it is to use shift (and a whole lot easier than using tilt and swing to achieve the effects of shift). Moving the tripod also keeps the center of the lens aligned with the center of the film. When you use front shift you start using the edges of the lens to make the photograph and the edges of some lenses tend to be less sharp than the center area.

    With respect to dropping the bed when using your 90mm lens, you need to drop the bed to avoid having the front of the bed in the picture with a 90mm lens only when the back is in vertical orientation. With horizontal you don't need to drop the bed. And even in vertical, you often can avoid the need to drop the bed by cranking front rise up a notch or two.

    You mention possibly replacing the Technika with a Chamonix or an Ebony. I've owned a 4x5 Chamonix and an Ebony SVTe. This isn't the place to compare the three cameras but FWIW I much preferred the Technika (and the Chamonix) to the Ebony and mildly preferred the Technika to the Chamonix. Obviously this is a matter of personal preference. But even the best wooden camera (and those are two of the best) isn't the equal of a good metal camera in terms of precision and stability.

    You also mention perhaps getting a multi-focus finder. I had one (the newer version). I didn't care much for it, a simple viewing card was an easier and far far less expensive alternative for me. The multi-focus finder is actually designed for use with the rangefinder, it wasn't designed to be used simply as an aid to composition which is how most people use it today. I found it cumbersome to carry around and awkward to use (the older versions with their slider are actually easier to use).

    Someone mentioned the book "Beyond The Zone System." I spent a lot of time studying that book and also took a one week workshop from the author, the late Phil Davis. That's an excellent book but it's quite complicated and I wouldn't recommend it as an introduction to the zone system. I'd suggest Ansel Adams' book "The Negative" and its chapters on the zone system. Or Fred Picker's book, "Zone VI Workshop" (out of print but occasionally comes up on ebay).

    In the zone system, one zone is always one stop. In a small nutshell, you place the darkest important shadow area in the scene on the zone you want (usually III or IV), use your meter to check the zone on which the brightest important highlight then falls, and base your development time on whatever that zone is. A Pentax Spotmeter, especially when you add the little circular zone sticker that Calumet used to sell and may still sell, is a great meter for using the zone system.

    Well, I've gone on much longer than I expected. Good luck with your camera, it's a great camera and I think with a little practice you'll enjoy using it.
    I believe this statement is incorrect;
    "With respect to dropping the bed when using your 90mm lens, you need to drop the bed to avoid having the front of the bed in the picture with a 90mm lens only when the back is in vertical orientation. With horizontal you don't need to drop the bed. And even in vertical, you often can avoid the need to drop the bed by cranking front rise up a notch or two."
    My experience has been;

    The bed, (using a 90 SA), is never visible with the back revolved to vertical.
    It is with the 75 SA that the front standard need to be jacked up 2-3 notches to avoid seeing the bed, when the back is revolved to vertical with a 75 SA 5.6 mounted.

    RM

  17. #17
    Jack Spratt
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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Quote Originally Posted by Rafael Macia View Post
    I believe this statement is incorrect;
    "With respect to dropping the bed when using your 90mm lens, you need to drop the bed to avoid having the front of the bed in the picture with a 90mm lens only when the back is in vertical orientation. With horizontal you don't need to drop the bed. And even in vertical, you often can avoid the need to drop the bed by cranking front rise up a notch or two."
    My experience has been;

    The bed, (using a 90 SA), is never visible with the back revolved to vertical.
    It is with the 75 SA that the front standard need to be jacked up 2-3 notches to avoid seeing the bed, when the back is revolved to vertical with a 75 SA 5.6 mounted.

    RM
    No, my statement is correct. I don't know why you don't see the bed using a 90mm lens on your Technika with the back in vertical position but it's a known problem (very minor one IMHO since it's so easily dealt with) on Technikas. IIRC the owner's manual for my Master Technika even discussed the problem and how to deal with it. If you do an all-words search on Google using the words "technika bed drop back vertical 90" you'll find many discussions of the problem. Again, it isn't a significant problem IMHO but it's something that has to be dealt with.

  18. #18
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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Spratt View Post
    No, my statement is correct. I don't know why you don't see the bed using a 90mm lens on your Technika with the back in vertical position but it's a known problem (very minor one IMHO since it's so easily dealt with) on Technikas. IIRC the owner's manual for my Master Technika even discussed the problem and how to deal with it. If you do an all-words search on Google using the words "technika bed drop back vertical 90" you'll find many discussions of the problem. Again, it isn't a significant problem IMHO but it's something that has to be dealt with.
    The 90 I have is the SA 5.6. I have also seen the references to dropping the bed in Linhof instruction books. I assumed it was an error, since it has never happened in my case. My Lens is mounted centered on the board, so it is a "mystery " to me.
    rm

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    Any updates on how you're getting on with the camera?

    I love the solid engineering of Linhof cameras. I'm currently using a Technika V and would some day love to see the new MT in the flesh.

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    As regards to the dark cloth. I use a Cambo so I use 2 clothspins to secure my dark cloth, but from my memories of using a Linhoff, I think there might be room to glue some velcro to the top and attach a corresponding piece to a dark cloth and keep it from falling off the camera. What I did to the linhoff was to inscribe focusing marks for my lenses and then I would zone focus, since I usually shot at fairly fixed distances. Not for any specific reason it just would work out that way. In fact I had a knotted string for accurate focusing. It all sounds crude doesn't it? Good luck on the developing, I used to use Adox, but no matter what I shot I always used Rodinal. I didn't mind the grain since the accutance was so supurb and the tonal values were delicate. A spotmeter shouldn't be a problem as long as you are used to a zone system, but I always preferred my Luna Pro, nothing like an incidence meter. Joe

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    Re: Linhof Master Technika - First Day Out

    I'm really looking forward to using my Tech V. I've sent it away for a clean and lube as some of the movements are a bit stiff – it's been lying dormant for about ten years! Before now I've only had experience with a Horseman 45FA which I loved for being small and portable. It will be interesting to see how using a Linhof differs in practice.

    I've had a mission trying to find solid information regarding recessed lens boards for use with a 90mm f/8 SA. Like Leica, I've come to realize that parts are very expensive but you get what you pay for.

    While primarily interested in shooting colour neg, I'm looking forward to developing some of my own black and whites. I think my photographic career has taken some twists and turns but all roads have led to a technical camera. One day I suppose I'll be shooting digital MF with an Alpa or Arca, but for now film suits me fine.

    T

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