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Thread: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

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    Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Specifically, I am trying to decide whether to go with a new (er) camera, such as a Tachihara double extension or Wehman, or if I should save a little and go with a used Deardorf. I have not handled a Deardorf, and know they have a great reputation. I just don't know them. I need a stable camera for field work shooting landscapes. They don't look solid, as they are quite aged, but I don't want to make an ignorant decision. Any input is appreciated as I narrow the search down.
    Thanks!
    Jon

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    At the same price, I'd much rather have a Tachihara in good condition than a ratty Deardorff.

    Don't stretch your budget to the point of discomfort solely because of "reputation". You should have a clear idea of what the extra money will buy for you and why you want it.

    Deardorffs in good condition are fine cameras, but you shouldn't assume that they're necessarily superior to other cameras just because of the famous name. The particular design might happen to suit you, and if that's the case a good one is worth the money, but depending on your needs and tastes you might do as well or better with a different brand.

    If you don't have any experience, I'd advise starting with a less expensive camera. It may turn out to be all you need. If it turns out to be not quite right, you'll know a lot more about what you need to look for next.

    Tachihara is a reasonable choice for an 8x10 on a relatively modest budget.

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Yeah any old Deardorff won't do you have to find a good one.

    Shen Hao is another Chinese brand worth considering.

    Personally I had a Wisner (returned), Gandolfi Variant (wrecked in a storm), and now two Toyo 810G monorails (one as a spare in case of another storm).

    The Gandolfi was a very fine camera, pretty close to Ebony in build quality. Single extension only.

    The Toyo monorails are great cameras but quite heavy at around 9 kgs just for the camera. If you want to shoot with 600mm lenses in windy conditions a monorail (and two tripods) is a must, though.
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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    My favorite 8x10 to actually use in the field was an old Arca Swiss AB, and they're pretty cheap. The nicest looking 8x10 I ever owned -- and the most expensive, and the one that drew all the attention whenever I had it out in the field -- was a Lotus. The most awkward to use in the field was, surprise, a Sinar P -- solid and robust and assymetrical movements, but a total PITA as a field camera.

    Deardorffs have incredibly tiny lock knobs. The Tachihara would be most similar to the Lotus I mentioned above, but if I were starting out in 8x10 now, I would seriously suggest look for an older Arca AB. Lars' Toyo is very similar to the Arca AB in use, though the Arca is more compact and easier to store in a pack.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Shen Hao built me an 8x10 camera to my specifications for the same price as their standard 8x10. My interest is architecture and environmental portraits, and the camera can mount lenses from 90mm to 450mm, all front movements (including 100mm rise) and a fixed back. Non-folding for quick deployment in unwelcoming urban areas. The weight is 3.4 kg.

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    DougDolde
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Just a thought, why 8x10 and not 4x5 ? The advantages are many and the increased resolution of the larger format may prove elusive. You'll be dealing with much less depth of field with longer lenses, slower shutter speeds due to smaller apertures trying to recover the lost depth of field, and that big wind catcher huge bellows.

    Unless you just like the gestalt of it why bother ?

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    8X10 is a blast to shoot, and there is definitely a gestalt to it. OTOH, if I were getting back into large format, and given that now quick and ready loads have gone away and I'd be back to loading holders anyway, I'd likely buy myself a 5x7 --- great compromise for size, weight, lens availability and capture area. A 5x7 is roughly half the capture area of 8x10, and thus nearly double the capture area of 4x5, but still can use many of the same lenses as a 4x5. Also, with most any contemporary 5x7 (or even 5x8) camera, you can get a 4x5 reducing back, so get a two-fer...

    My measly .02,
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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Doug, have you shot 4x5 and 8x10 so you are in a position to actually compare? I suspect from your comment that maybe you have, but it's not obvious.

    I'd like to raise the question of 5x7/5x8 vs 8x10: One aspect here is digitizing options. With 8x10, if you want really good scans you have to either get into drumscanner territory or get a high-end flatbed to do wetmounted scans on. With 5x7 options are far more - Imacon has (had) one model that scans 5x7 and IIRC several midrange flatbeds can do 5x7.

    Another aspect, as Jack points out, is lens selection. Lenses for 5x7 are inherently smaller and thus often cheaper, and selection of good recent designs is much wider.

    Then again, a well focused 8x10 slide on a light table is almost impossible to match with any other capture or display technology. Call it gestalt if you want, but how else can you ever visually communicate such a massive amount of information? Certainly not in the digital display world, and with prints you'd have to get into wall-to-ceiling lightjet prints to come close. I did a presentation a week ago at a client, and while we discussed making prints, the slides on the light table is what put a permanent grin on the faces of everyone attending. 5x7 gets close; 4x5 is too small to impress anyone.

    so - for slide film I'd prefer 8x10, for negs 5x7 unless contact printing is a priority.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Excuse my ignorance but is this inches or centimeters?

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by gero View Post
    Excuse my ignorance but is this inches or centimeters?
    Reasonable question though - inches.
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  11. #11
    DougDolde
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Actually no I never shot 8x10, but a lot of 4x5 until two years ago when I acquired an Aptus 75S.

    It's only been the last six months since the longing to shoot film again has finally abated. 9/10 of the time I get a better result with the Aptus than 4x5 though the look is certainly different.

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    There is definitely something to seeing the larger tranny's on a light table. There is also something to composing on the larger GG's. For sure actual scheimpflug adjustments are easier to "see" on the larger GG's and focus does seem to pop in and out more clearly.

    One thing we didn't mention re 8x10, is film flatness starts to become more of an issue as formats go up, and here is another benefit of the slightly smaller 5x7/8... Finally, at least for me personally, I find the almost 3:4 aspect ratio of 5x7 more pleasing compositionally than the 4:5, and in fact I usually cropped my 4x5's (and 8x10's) down a bit to get to 3:4 anyway...
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Thanks for the solid input everyone!
    I actually shoot 4x5 and 6x17 cm on a 5x7 body. I am not going with 5x7 because I shoot color transparencies exclusively. I do believe the print quality from 8x10 is visible, at least for the educated photographer. I am sure I would use it selectively, but I would like to add it to my arsenal.
    Unfortunately, I have a desire for the best equipment, but am being a bit frugal right now...and thus looking for a "good deal". I am actually considering the Wehman. All my other cameras are Canhams, which I love. I just don't have the budget tight now. This bothers me a bit, as Keith Canham is fantastic to deal with. We'll see what happens along.
    Any other input is always appreciated.
    Enjoy the View!
    Jon

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    Reasonable question though - inches.
    Thankyou Lars, I just bought my first print and they told me it was from an 8x10 negative and now I know.

    It was from a grate mexican photographer Armando Salas Portugal.

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by jonpaul View Post
    I have a desire for the best equipment, but am being a bit frugal right now...and thus looking for a "good deal". I am actually considering the Wehman.
    The Wehman is affordable, but then so is an old Calumet 8x10 C folder at half the Wehman, and basically the Wehman is a sort-of Swiss-cheesed copy of the C1. Seriously, for what you would spend on a Wehman, you can get a really decent Arca AB in 8x10, and trust me, you'll be boatloads happier. No, it isn't a field folder like your Canhams, but you can move both standards onto on of the 6" rails, and remove that as an assembly from the base rail and stuff it in your pack in the same slot you'd use for a folder. Just leave the base rail on your tripod. Plus, used in this fashion, the set up and tear down is essentially as fast or faster than any field folder. (To wit, I could have the Arca out of the bag, on the tripod and zeroed way faster than my Lotus.) And the Arca is pretty darn rigid.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    What do you all think of my looking into an inexpensive monorail to try things out and see what I think? then I can try to get my hands on some field cameras to try. I know it would limit me to about 1 mile from the car, but perhaps it is the prudent way to go?

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Uh, the Arca I mentioned IS an inexpensive monorail, but it certainly won't keep you close to the car. IIRC, mine weighed about 11 pounds total with the big base rail clamp which aint too bad for a rigid 8x10.
    Jack
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    I paid $500 each for my Toyo 810G's and they are pretty close to the Linhofs in quality and rigidity.

    The tricky thing is to figure out how to pack a monorail. I found a 150 mm rail section for Toyo which allows me to slide both standards together and pack the camera flat in my backpack.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    I hear you Jack. I just don't seam to be able to locate one. Also, an Arca specialist I know in Arizona warned me of issues with replacement parts he has had with customers that own those. i know there are aleays issues, but mostly, I just am not finding the cameras available. I'll keep trying.

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Of course Rod is going to say that, he wants to sell you a NEW one! Bottom line is that the most of the replacement parts you'll ever need can be stolen from the same vintage 4x5 models. If the bellows are shot, you can have a new one custom made for around $300. Oh, and most of the older Arca 8x10's had bail backs which IMO are a HUGE benefit when working with 8x10 holders!
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Thanks again Jack. I am hunting diligently for a camera now. We'll see how it goes. Then, lenses for 8x10 color work (multi-coated) that afford some front tilts for focus and won't break the bank. I already have a Rodenstock 360, so perhaps a 240.
    I appreciate the input you each share. In this case, ignorance is not bliss!

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    A 210 G-Claron will cover 8x10 if you stop down to f22, it's a pretty good performer and can be had cheap. I would pay the extra to get one in a factory shutter for the 210 as there are a lot of cobbled together ones floating around with shutters from whatever. They are single-coated only, so a bit more prone to flare perhaps, but I really liked the way they rendered on both color neg and tranny emulsions; near the end, I had a 210, 240, 305 and 355 -- and ended up selling up everything else in that range, even the exotics like my 150 and 210 SSXL's, Computar 210 and eventually my Cooke Triple --- a sale I later regretted FWIW. Actually, I liked the rendering (and price) of the G-Clarons so much, I later bought a 150 for my 4x5!

    Also, if you happen to already own a Schneider 110 SSXL, it will almost fully illuminate 8x10 at infinity/f22(!) I would not rush out and buy one for 8x10, the resolution isn't superb at the edges, but if you already own one it's worth trying It's VERY wide on 8x10, so plenty of room to trim the corners and you probably net as good a wide image as if you used one of the dedicated 120 super-wides.

    Longer, I had a phenomenal copy of the Rodenstock 480 Rodagon that was about the same size as the G-Claron 355, and enough diferent than the 305 that it was the long focal I carried. So my 8x10 bag usually had the 210 and 305 G-Clarons, the Rodie 480 and the 110 SSXL. The Arca, lenses, meter, loupe, hood and four holders all fit in a medium f64 backpack and weighed around 25 pounds. I carried the tripod in my hands.
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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Lots of 240's cover 8x10 - more tricky with 210. Jack mentioned the G-Claron; I have a single-coated Fujinon-w 210 f/5.6 that covers with some margin but it's a bit harder to find. I also have a 240 f/5.6 Apo-Symmar (sharp, contrasty, heavy) and a 250 f/6.3 Fujinon-W (huge image circle), and I used to have a 240 f/9 Fujinon-A (tiny, too dark to focus for me). 240 feels like a wide normal more than a moderate wide. In general I feel more comfortable with wider lenses on 8x10 than on other formats since there is so much film area to crop from.

    Aside from cost, the 150XL is a fantastic 8x10 wideangle - ridiculously sharp, lots of coverage for aggressive shifts (you get almost half the vertical frame in shift), and much more compact than the 121 Super Angulons. Centerfilter required for positive color film. Some find it too contrasty - typical modern Schneider look if you will.

    Jack you're referring to my old Apo-Ronar 480? I think Rodagon is an enlarging lens (which of course doesn't mean it can't be mounted on a camera).
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post

    Jack you're referring to my old Apo-Ronar 480? I think Rodagon is an enlarging lens (which of course doesn't mean it can't be mounted on a camera).
    Lars, you are correct -- my mistake. Yes, it was YOUR old APO Ronar, and it was a amazing!
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    alexrock23
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    The only 8x10 Toyo lists is an 810MII and at 15 lbs, is one of the heaviest 8x10 field cameras. It has good specifications and seems highly thought of in terms of being solid and smooth. If you're shooting near the car, I think it would be an excellent choice, but if you ever even think about putting it in a pack and walking more than a quarter mile, I'd think again.

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    A 150XL is a legendary lens - but why complicate the "on/in field" experience with a CF when shooting E6 - keep it simple -or shoot C41.

    My opinion from first hand experience - others will no doubt differ.

    Cheers!

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tex View Post
    A 150XL is a legendary lens - but why complicate the "on/in field" experience with a CF when shooting E6 - keep it simple -or shoot C41.

    My opinion from first hand experience - others will no doubt differ.

    Cheers!
    Yep I solidly disagree can't stand the fall-off. Purely subjective, as you point out.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by alexrock23 View Post
    The only 8x10 Toyo lists is an 810MII and at 15 lbs, is one of the heaviest 8x10 field cameras. It has good specifications and seems highly thought of in terms of being solid and smooth. If you're shooting near the car, I think it would be an excellent choice, but if you ever even think about putting it in a pack and walking more than a quarter mile, I'd think again.
    The 810GII monorail (seen here) is certainly also a Toyo 8x10. Being a monorail it's even heavier at 20 lbs but I have routinely carried mine in a backpack (Super Trekker, about 60 lbs loaded) for up to full day (slow) hikes. So it's certainly possible to get far away from your mechanised transportation. It just depends on how strong and persistent (ok, stubborn) you are.

    Note that the weight of my camera is only a third of my total system weight, so fixating on camera weight alone might not be quite rational. If you seriously want to cut system weight then step down to 5x7 as everything gets smaller - camera, lens, tripod, film holders, etc. OK maybe not the light meter.

    The 810MII is one of the most rigid field cameras you can find. If you can find one - they are highly sought after.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    "Okay maybe not the light meter?" Unless you use a Pocket Spot; a very good spot meter that's smaller than a pack of cigarettes. http://meteredlight.blogspot.com/

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    I used the old Pocket Spot back in 2003-2004, fine piece of engineering but in the end sparse in function and overpriced for what it did. I found it not very practical for zone thinking. In addition the company was more or less impossible to contact, online or by phone. Perhaps the new product is better thought out but I wouldn't bet $425 on that just yet.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    I'm also interested in a 8x10" field-camera!

    I thought about a Deardorff, although Ebony and Lotus would propably offer superior quality (at a superior price tag as well...). Some people like the old Kodak Masterview.
    But I'm more the metal-guy, I don't really trust wood as a material for precision tools. What about Toyo?

    Why 8x10" ? Well, with 4x5" you already have to fight with the filmholders, dust, screen, bellows - all the large-format-issues, so why don't use a 4x larger format in the first place? Although the Linhof Master Technika would be my dream camera and there is only a very old 8x10" version available...

    @Jack Flesher
    I've tried to find information about the Arca-Swiss AB - didn't find any. Is it some kind of lightweight monorail camera? I only saw the astonishing Misura - but I can hardly pay 5k€ for it...

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    georgl,
    Both toyo 8x10's (810G monorail and 810M field) are quite solid. Not superlight but they do take a licking. I've abused my 810G quite severely during 12 months in the Australian outback, including canyon climbing, sandstorms, pouring rain (ok, that was Tasmania). I'd say they are comparable to Linhof in usability and construction but perhaps not quite as elegant in design and manufacturing. The upside is that you pay much less for the brand name on the second-hand market. Like I mentioned before - I paid 500 for mine back in 2004 when the market was flooded with them. Perhaps less so now.
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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    BTW as you noticed the Arca Swiss company has this cunning ability to stay under the radar - I guess it's called unmarketing.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Yes, Arca-Swiss is more than just strange - but their quality is without any doubt.

    A Toyo field for 500$ ? Doesn't sound like much at all. I'm willing to spend about 1500€ for the camera, I already bought a 300mm Sironar-N (there doesn't seem to be a major difference to the current Sironar-S ?) with Prontor shutter (is it just me, or what's with the Seiko-shutters - the mechanics are simply cheap, even with an Alpa?).
    What about film holders? The bay recently offered Sinar adhesive-holders, but I missed them.
    Anything else to keep in mind?

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    The A/S "AB" model is an old design no longer made, so you'll only find it used, and ergo relatively cheap. However, it's standards will still fit on the new rails.
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Thanks again for all the input guys! At the moment I am leaning toward the Wehman 8x10 field camera. I can't find a reasonably priced used Arca, i think the Toyo is abit heavy and bulky for my specific needs, etc. I just have to come to terms with the higher budget price. Then I will try to settle on a 240mm lens first, next a 150, etc.
    I appreciate your honest input. it helped me put my priorities together.

  37. #37
    DougDolde
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    A brand spanking new Arca Swiss 8x10 would be indulgence for sure but....considering the price of medium format digital looks pretty cheap.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ew_Camera.html

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    You ar3e correct Doug. However, neither are what I'm shooting for. I can get the new Wehman for $2K ish. Seems like the best choice relative to all I've found and what I need. Let's see if I can get myself to pull the trigger now

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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by DougDolde View Post
    A brand spanking new Arca Swiss 8x10 would be indulgence for sure but....considering the price of medium format digital looks pretty cheap.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ew_Camera.html
    GREAT logic!
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  40. #40
    SCHWARZZEIT
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    The A/S "AB" model is an old design no longer made, so you'll only find it used, and ergo relatively cheap. However, it's standards will still fit on the new rails.
    Is this the Arca AB model you're referring to?

    -Dominique

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by SCHWARZZEIT View Post
    Is this the Arca AB model you're referring to?

    -Dominique
    That's actually a "B" model without axial tilts, but of the proper vintage. The AB model is identical, but has axial as well as base tilts on both standards and weighs about half a kilo more than the basic B.

    Note too the "bail" back --- very convenient for inserting/removing large, thick holders!

    I hijacked that photo for thread posterity:
    Jack
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    SCHWARZZEIT
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    That's actually a "B" model without axial tilts, but of the proper vintage. The AB model is identical, but has axial as well as base tilts on both standards and weighs about half a kilo more than the basic B.

    Note too the "bail" back --- very convenient for inserting/removing large, thick holders!

    I hijacked that photo for thread posterity:
    I'm enjoying the convenience of the bail back on my Arca M. It's a very clever system.

    In the dealer's description it say's the B is not compatible with the 171mm lens board system. Do you remember what type of lens boards you used on your AB?

    -Dominique

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    I might be late to the game here but I noticed that Richard Ritter in Vermont (the builder of the Zone VI camera) for the Fred Picker Zone VI studios is building a new 8x10 wooden camera. From what I saw it has carbon fiber rails in it so it might be worth looking at.

    Jason

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by SCHWARZZEIT View Post
    In the dealer's description it say's the B is not compatible with the 171mm lens board system. Do you remember what type of lens boards you used on your AB?

    -Dominique
    Hmmmm... I had an adapter board to Linhof tech, so it may have been something other than standard AS 171. Now that I think about it, I seem to recall more rounded corners than typical 171, but am not sure. I've seen reference to a "C" model that looked just like the AB -- in fact I always thought they were the same thing -- but maybe it had standard 171 board front?
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    The Toyo monorails are great cameras but quite heavy at around 9 kgs just for the camera. If you want to shoot with 600mm lenses in windy conditions a monorail (and two tripods) is a must, though.
    FYI, one of the nice things about the Toyo G series is that you can mix-and-match parts between the various formats and if you're clever and careful, you can save quite a bit of weight.

    For example, my Toyo 45G weighs just under 8lbs in its current form, thanks to mixing parts between various other Toyo models, and my 810g is down to just over 15lbs for similar reasons (and a minor bit of machine work).

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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Having used 8x10, (a 5x7 reducing back), and 4x5 (a 6cmx9cm reducing back) for 40 years, I have to say there is still nothing like an 8"x10" transparancy. Literally one can see texture on glass. I lugged around an old Ansco Field camera which as I recall weighed 27lbs(about 12+ Kg). It always comes down to what you want from the end result. In architectural shots (which is what I did a lot of) I could get more swings and tilts with the 4x5 view camera than I could get on the 8x10 field camera. But that is an obvious thing, but I also found that there was more coverage on the 4x5 lenses than on the 8x10's. I would say, go for the sturdiest and then the lightest body you can afford. Joe

  47. #47
    davidpz
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Deardorff anyday for a field camera. I've been using them since 1978 outdoors or in the studio regardless whether it was a roomset, still life or a portrait. I've owned a Gandolphi (& waited 6 years to get it) - don't go near them. Ebony, didn't live up to my expectations & got sold off in the first month. Linhof Technikarden fantastic and equally at home in the studio or up a mountain. Except, it's made of metal & not as at home to the elements as a Deardorff. Sinar P2 -definately a studio camera & not something you want to lug about, get wet, or drip on the sand. I've just sold off my 10x8 kit but still have my 5x7 Special. As for the Derdorff lookalikes from Japan, I've never owned one. I've fiddled with them in the store and not really liked them. Lack of robustness. If a Deardorff was good enough for Adams, Weston, Penn, Avedon & the like - who am I to criticise?

  48. #48
    jeanba3000
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    Hello

    I had a vintage Century #2 8x10, a bit shaking but enough for pinhole photography, at that time I hadn't money for lenses…

    Now I have an Arca Swiss F-classic which weights only 600g more than the Century #2, less than 4 kg and its stability and possibilities does not compare to the old wooden one. Price also is not comparable, even second hand (I paid my 8x10" Arca ~2000€)…
    I think Arca makes an 8x10" Misura, that comes with a clever folding rail so the folded camera takes no more place than any 8x10" wooden field camera.

    I you want a wooden camera, you might also consider Argentum cameras, a recent hungarian manufacturer. They have some very lightweight cameras, they also build to order in any size for reasonable prices ; a french photographer ordered them a 8x8" square camera and is very satisfied with the product.

  49. #49
    Mike_S
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    I just purchased this camera, it is perfect for what I need. Can take from 90mm lens to around 400mm. Very light and well made.

    http://www.bhcamera.us/wilderness810.php

  50. #50
    frednewman
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    Re: Choosing an 8x10 field camera?

    My favorite 8x10 field camera is the 8x10 Metal MQC Canham camera. It's light weight, solid, comes with a great fresnel and ground glass for focusing and even a focusing scale. It's always my first recommendation when someone asks about 8x10 cameras. Plus Keith Canham is a great guy to deal with.

    Fred Newman

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