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Thread: Starting 8x10 view camera

  1. #1
    Deceased, but remembered fondly here... johnastovall's Avatar
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    Starting 8x10 view camera

    I'm wanting to get back into LF film work. I'm wanting to do 8x10 contact printing.

    My heart says get an 8x10 Deardorff but my pocket says, "See what the other options are."

    What are my other options in 8x10?

    "The market wants a Leica to be a Leica: the inheritor of tradition, the subject of lore, and indisputably a mark of status to own."
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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    I got two Toyo 810G monorails off ebay a few years ago, when studio photogs were running towards digital capture. But they are arguably "a bit" awkward in the field - think 70 lb backpack.

    I also have an 8x10 Gandolfi Variant in walnut, great camera although only double extension. I smashed it up a bit in a storm in Australia (the center filter for the 150XL took the brunt of the fall onto granite) so I need to ask Gandolfi to rebuild it.

    My first 8x10 was a Wisner Pocket Expedition. It was superlight but way too flimsy, I returned it after a week.

    Keep in mind that stability requirements when stepping up from 4x5 to 8x10 are far more than a factor of two, I'd say 10x if you want to take advantage of the film real estate. Not so much of an issue when contact printing though.

    Other options:

    If you can find a used Toyo 810M metal field for a good price then that's a great field camera a little heavy but built like a tank.

    Shen Hao makes good cameras that are a great value.

    Don't even look at Ebony unless you want to take out another morgage, Ebony cameras will seduce you. Just don't.

    Other brands for new field cameras: Canham, Seagull (same as Shen Hao), Chamonix (not sure if they make an 8x10), Tachihara, Walker. Linhof and Arca-Swiss of course.

    Some outlets:
    US: Badger Graphic http://www.badgergraphic.com great prices and service.
    England: Robert White http://www.robertwhite.co.uk great prices very knowledgeable and a joy to do business with.

    It all depends on how you will use the camera and what your priorities are - weight, portability, cost, technical flexibility, setup speed (relatively speaking hehe) and convenience.

    I hope this helps please feel free to ask more specific questions.

    And don't forget the option of using hybrid processes and digital negatives to do contact printing. Jim Collum has done a great deal of that. You could for example use a 4x5 camera, scan and print to an 11x14 digital negative and do a platinum print from that. It takes a little extra work but it's a very enjoyable process with very personal results, truly a craft.

    Lars
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    John,

    If you haven't used a Deardorff before I have a 5x7 Deardorff which should give an idea of how the 8x10 handles plus an 8x10 Agfa/Ansco, 8x10 Calumet C-1, and an 11x14 Burke & James (which is very similar to the 8x10 B&J, just bigger) if you're interested in some hands on. I'm about 2 hours away from you according to Google Maps.

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    I have no idea what a basic Deardorff brings now, but I suspect not too much. However, as Lars mentioned, a Toyo or older style Arca are usually under $1000. The holders are the hard -- and expensive -- part to find! Also look at Chamonix!
    Jack
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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Yep holders... I have about 15 I think, bought most of them used. Some are quite old with brittle darkslides, newer darksliders are of more flexible material. If you buy second hand holders make sure the darkslides have undamaged edges otherwise you might get light leaks. Start out with 2 new holders so you have something you can trust before venturing into second hand.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Lars, the only new holders I am aware one can buy are Chamonix, Canham and Lotus. Lisco/Fidelity went out of business a few years back.
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Jack - good to know.

    John - do you have any thoughts yet re lenses you will want to use?
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Another choice to consider is Cambo and Sinar. There is a Deardorff on ebay with a $595 Buy-It-Now, but it is the basic one, not the full movement version.
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Deceased, but remembered fondly here... johnastovall's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    I had looked at a Toyo and it looks good. I'll keep doing more looking.

    Good question on the lens. I'm looking to to both landscape and buildings with it.

    Suggestions for ones to look for?

    "The market wants a Leica to be a Leica: the inheritor of tradition, the subject of lore, and indisputably a mark of status to own."
    Mike Johnston


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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Divide by 6 to get approximate 35mm equivalent focal length.

    moderately wide: 210 G-Claron will cover 8x10 with a bit of room and is reasonably priced.

    wide-normal: 240 G-Claron covers with room, affordable.

    Normal: 300 G-Claron is very good, has quite a bit of room and is relatively inexpensive, a 300 Nikkor M just makes 8x10, and 300 Fujinon A or C cover with a bit of room.

    The really wide 8x10 lenses get more esoteric and expensive. If you can find a Protar IV 190, it is a great 8x10 lens and tiny. The Super Symmar 150 XL is very good, but large and expensive.

    If you can find one, the Cooke XVa Triple Convertible is stunning, and you get three focals in one lens; a 311, 476 and 646 -- this was one of my favorites, but expensive, and I rarely used it other than at 311 -- and you need a lot of bellows to focus a 646! (). I also really liked the 12 inch Gold Dot single-coated "Kern" Dagor.
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Deceased, but remembered fondly here... johnastovall's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Used Toyo monorails do look nice and look good price wise.

    "The market wants a Leica to be a Leica: the inheritor of tradition, the subject of lore, and indisputably a mark of status to own."
    Mike Johnston


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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Jack (speaking from personal knowledge), Calumet has a BIG inventory of new 810 Fidelity holders AND 57's.

    Calumet owned Fidelity before it closed.

    John, please note (as Lars mentioned) that 810's are/can be a huge PIA in the field.
    Last edited by Tex; 1st May 2009 at 16:39.

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Robert, that is good news, thanks!

    John, my advice is to call them tomorrow and get yourself a dozen new holders. From experience, I can tell you that dorking around with used holders can be a time suck and major PITA.
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Deceased, but remembered fondly here... johnastovall's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    Robert, that is good news, thanks!

    John, my advice is to call them tomorrow and get yourself a dozen new holders. From experience, I can tell you that dorking around with used holders can be a time suck and major PITA.
    Good idea but it'll have to be Monday. I'm headed to Austin tomorrow to pick up an R APO 180/3.4 and maybe if they'll horsetrade an R 90/2.0 'Cron for my new/old SL2 and Canon bodies.

    "The market wants a Leica to be a Leica: the inheritor of tradition, the subject of lore, and indisputably a mark of status to own."
    Mike Johnston


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    Senior Member Don Hutton's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    The Chamonix 8x10 is a fabulous field camera - light, ultra rigid and a very sensible design. I have one and own it in preference to just about every other 8x10 field camera ever made - and I have owned most of them!

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    I agree. The Chamonix seems to be the best option these days. However, I've owned a 4X5 Tachihara for 15 years and never regreted buying it. Check it out.
    Eduardo

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Hutton View Post
    The Chamonix 8x10 is a fabulous field camera - light, ultra rigid and a very sensible design. I have one and own it in preference to just about every other 8x10 field camera ever made - and I have owned most of them!

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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Wider lenses for 8x10... Here's what I have owned, longest focal length first:

    Fujinon-W 250/6.7 (I think it's 6.7, it's the older 250): 398 mm image circle great for architecture. Sharp. Odd Seiko shutter I had to cut a special lens board. Mine is single-coated.

    Apo-Symmar 240: Not really a wide lens, not much movement on 8x10. Bright groundglass image, very sharp, good microcontrast. Heavy in Copal 3 shutter.

    Fujinon-A 240/9: Sweet little lens in a 0 shutter, ideal for backcountry work. Too dark for composing and focusing at dawn which is my favorite light, so I sold it.

    Fujinon-W 210/5.6 (older design): Great lens for 8x10, in Copal 1 shutter, 352 mm IC covers with margins. Hits the sweet spot as moderate wide for 8x10. Hard to find, a keeper.

    Super-Symmar XL 150/5.6: This lens is ridiculously good for 8x10. 400 mm image circle so you can do a full vertical shift. Groundglass image gets a bit dark because of its wide coverage. Resolution and sharpness is all there, it takes my drum scanner for a workout at 2000 dpi. Center filter required for color film, on B/W neg film I think it's a matter of taste. Expensive but probably good resell value. Filtration is a little bit tricky on such a wide lens, but it has a 62 mm rear thread which is very handy. For grads I use a Lee holder with a 112 mm slip-on adapter that fits on the center filter.

    Currently I pack Cooke XVa (311/473/646 mm), Fujinon 210, SSXL 150. Sometimes the Fujinon 250 if shifts needed.

    Here's a handy list of specs for some lenses:

    http://graflex.org/lenses/lens-spec.html

    A comment on studio monorails: The added weight in these cameras puts a strain on camera support. You need to step up tripod and head size one or two steps. I went from Gitzo 3-series to 5-series when going from wood field to Toyo monorail, and to fully utilize resolution I still need two tripods when using long lenses. Likewise the Arca-Swiss B1 got too flimsy (to be honest, a ball head is not a good idea for 8x10 but I guess I was stubborn). So unless you have a very sturdy body frame you need to work out of a car when using a monorail system. Supertrekker is a great backpack for 8x10 BTW.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    Wider lenses for 8x10... Here's what I have owned, longest focal length first:

    Fujinon-W 250/6.7 (I think it's 6.7, it's the older 250): 398 mm image circle great for architecture. Sharp. Odd Seiko shutter I had to cut a special lens board. Mine is single-coated.

    The f/6.3 covers 8x10 with movements (and you can get them in Copal #1 shutters, the latest ones came in these). The f/6.7 is the newer version and *barely* covers 8x10 stopped down.

    My 8x10 "sharp lens" setup is the 250mm and 360mm f/6.3 Fujis.

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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    The f/6.3 covers 8x10 with movements (and you can get them in Copal #1 shutters, the latest ones came in these). The f/6.7 is the newer version and *barely* covers 8x10 stopped down.

    My 8x10 "sharp lens" setup is the 250mm and 360mm f/6.3 Fujis.
    Actually, that does not seem to be quite accurate - the currently sold 250 f/6.3 (listed at Robert White) is speced as covering 320 mm at f/22.

    My sample is labeled on an inside ring around the front element "FUJINON-W S 1:6.7/250 FUJI PHOTO OPTICAL CO. 250888 LENS-JAPAN". Front thread is 67 mm, rear element has an outer diameter of 65 mm. The shutter says "Seiko" on front and "LS 24 made in Japan" on the side. I measured the IC again and at f/32 it covers just about 400 mm. It's very clearly single-coated. According to Kerry Thalmann the original W 250/6.7 lens was replaced by a f/6.3 version about 1979, so it would seem that my sample is of the original W 250 series. EBC multicoating was introduced in 1977-1982 (Thalmann) which further dates my sample to late seventies.
    Last edited by Lars; 3rd May 2009 at 03:35.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    Actually, that does not seem to be quite accurate - the currently sold 250 f/6.3 (listed at Robert White) is speced as covering 320 mm at f/22.

    My sample is labeled on an inside ring around the front element "FUJINON-W S 1:6.7/250 FUJI PHOTO OPTICAL CO. 250888 LENS-JAPAN". Front thread is 67 mm, rear element has an outer diameter of 65 mm. The shutter says "Seiko" on front and "LS 24 made in Japan" on the side. I measured the IC again and at f/32 it covers just about 400 mm. It's very clearly single-coated. According to Kerry Thalmann the original W 250/6.7 lens was replaced by a f/6.3 version about 1979, so it would seem that my sample is of the original W 250 series. EBC multicoating was introduced in 1977-1982 (Thalmann) which further dates my sample to late seventies.
    You are correct, Lars, I grabbed the wrong lens from the cabinet to check. Have only been shooting with the 360mm lately and must have had f/6.3 baked into my mind.

  21. #21
    Rick Moore
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    Lars, the only new holders I am aware one can buy are Chamonix, Canham and Lotus. Lisco/Fidelity went out of business a few years back.
    I just checked, and Badger Graphic has both Toyo and Fidelity 8x10 holders in stock.

    I use the Toyo 8x10 holders and they are very well made. The Chamonix 8x10 holders with the carbon fibre darkslides are both lightweight and beautiful, for about double the price of the Fidelity ones.

  22. #22
    msglueck
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Hi,

    I am also starting 8x10. Got a Toyo 8x10G for 300 in good shape. Now I am looking for lenses, too. I got an Nikkor-W 5,6/240mm offered for 399 with shutter. A bit expensive, isn't it? Anybody has some input on this lens?

    Best regards,
    Markus

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Hey all,

    I never had a Large format before, and even never have a film camera before, first ever Medium Format i bought was this year which is Hasselblad H3DII, but after i got that Hasselblad i am thinking very strongly to go film direction, and because i have a medium format even not film this time i said i should go larger, so i am so looking for a large format camera, also i read there are different format sizes, and i really want to go with 8x10, i don't care of the price of the body or lenses if i can get something decent, but i didn't know where to ask as i didn't get answers usually and most telling me to go with used, in fact i don't like to use used items at all, so i am looking for only "New" large format [8x10], so if you know where i can find one and it is good enough then it will be my pleasure.

    I saw a Sinar P3 [and P2] in one locally store in my country, i also liked it but i don't see many here or everywhere going with this large format camera, so that i wasn't sure about it, and also it is 4x5 which again made me to look for something else, but i may keep it as my last option if i can find any 8x10 or larger New.

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Hey professional,
    For extra advice also look at the lf photography forum...a very friendly place!

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/

    Marc

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Talking of 10x8 (or 8x10 as most of you know it) I'm currently deciding between 54 and 10x8 for my upcoming projects...I've used 54 extensively over the years and travelled and hiked lot with it.(usually just a 2 lens set up)
    The larger size neg of the 10x8 is so very appealing but with the hiking up (and down) mountains, walking miles to locations, airplane travel etc that all my upcoming projects require can I really afford the extra weight of the 10x8 set up...(bigger and heavier camera, lenses. darkslides, tripod,bag, etc , etc!)

    Don't worry...not looking for answers here, just mulling it over out load.

    Marc

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    Senior Member Don Hutton's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    5x7 Marc... It is a fantastic compromise and to be honest, unless you're printing huge - as in larger than 80x60, you are just not going to see any extra quality from 8x10. Diffraction tends to be a significant factor with high quality 8x10 and IMO, 5x7 is the ultimate sweet spot...

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Thanks Don,
    I've thought about 5x7 as a good medium but I mostly shoot colour and as far as I am aware it's not so easy getting sheet film in 5x7 as 54.

    Marc

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    Senior Member Don Hutton's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Marc

    It's an obstacle, but certainly not an insurmountable one... Cutting down 8x10 is dead easy. There are actually quite a few 5x7 color emulsions available, but you have to look and buy a stash when you find it. That said, I really like Portra 160VC and cut it down from 8x10! Dead easy with a Rotatrim in the darkroom...

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Professional View Post
    Hey all,

    I never had a Large format before, and even never have a film camera before, first ever Medium Format i bought was this year which is Hasselblad H3DII, but after i got that Hasselblad i am thinking very strongly to go film direction, and because i have a medium format even not film this time i said i should go larger, so i am so looking for a large format camera, also i read there are different format sizes, and i really want to go with 8x10, i don't care of the price of the body or lenses if i can get something decent, but i didn't know where to ask as i didn't get answers usually and most telling me to go with used, in fact i don't like to use used items at all, so i am looking for only "New" large format [8x10], so if you know where i can find one and it is good enough then it will be my pleasure.

    I saw a Sinar P3 [and P2] in one locally store in my country, i also liked it but i don't see many here or everywhere going with this large format camera, so that i wasn't sure about it, and also it is 4x5 which again made me to look for something else, but i may keep it as my last option if i can find any 8x10 or larger New.
    Professional,
    I am new to the forum, but a comment if you haven't got an 810 yet.
    Arca swiss rail cameras can be very field friendly.
    I have taken mine to Antarctica as well as Europe, and all over the US and Canada.
    By collapsing it onto one of the 6" rails it easily fits a back pack as, except for the rail
    piece it is only 3" thick and under 9 lbs for newest model.
    Great screen, and the bale system to insert holders is exquisite, and simple.
    I also have a system which will easily calculate your required aperture for then shot you are working on. I teach LF at Scottsdale Community College.
    Anyway I love my camera as I bought a 4x5 first and got the 810 format chg set for it to have both sizes. Takes 30 seconds to change.
    email if any questions.
    Rod

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by RodK View Post
    Professional,
    I am new to the forum, but a comment if you haven't got an 810 yet.
    Arca swiss rail cameras can be very field friendly.
    I have taken mine to Antarctica as well as Europe, and all over the US and Canada.
    By collapsing it onto one of the 6" rails it easily fits a back pack as, except for the rail
    piece it is only 3" thick and under 9 lbs for newest model.
    Great screen, and the bale system to insert holders is exquisite, and simple.
    I also have a system which will easily calculate your required aperture for then shot you are working on. I teach LF at Scottsdale Community College.
    Anyway I love my camera as I bought a 4x5 first and got the 810 format chg set for it to have both sizes. Takes 30 seconds to change.
    email if any questions.
    Rod
    Hi Rod,

    Thank you very much for your reply!
    So where i can get that 8x10 Arca Swiss? or where i can find any 8x10 LF? i checked KEH.com and i saw only one 8x10 LF camera there and i don't use ebay at all.

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    Senior Member stephengilbert's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Professional,

    As Lars said, US: Badger Graphic http://www.badgergraphic.com great prices and service.

    Steve

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    Senior Member bensonga's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    +1 on Badger Graphic. Bought my Ebony 45SU from them.....they were very helpful with info and advice when I was trying to pick from the many models available.

    Gary

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Ah cool, i will have a look, thank you very much!

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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Due to a medical injury I am having to liquidate my 8x10 equipment. So if someone is looking to get into 8x10 I have a full setup (minus tripod) including 8x10 Kodak Master View, 250mm f/6.7 Fujinon, 360mm f/6.3 Fujinon and 10 plastic 8x10 holders that I'll be listing sale.

  35. #35
    Oxide Blu
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by stephengilbert View Post
    Professional,

    As Lars said, US: Badger Graphic http://www.badgergraphic.com great prices and service.

    Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Professional View Post
    Ah cool, i will have a look, thank you very much!

    Badger Graphic also sells the Ebony line of view cameras. They are often compared to the other high-end view cameras -- and have a high-end price, too.

    http://www.ebonycamera.com/cam.html

    I'm hoping to get an Ebony in the near future, a really miss shooting LF -- went out yesterday and bought a $1 quick pick ticket -- first time I have every bought a lottery ticket.

  36. #36
    Subscriber Member Streetshooter's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    This is all nice but there just ain't nothing like a Deardorff.....

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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Streetshooter View Post
    This is all nice but there just ain't nothing like a Deardorff.....
    I take it that's said tongue in cheek? Such a statement can be misleading to the novice (which is what this thread is about).
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Streetshooter View Post
    This is all nice but there just ain't nothing like a Deardorff.....
    What is with Deardorff that is not with another LF, or let's say what makes Deardorff so special over the other LFs?

  39. #39
    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Professional View Post
    What is with Deardorff that is not with another LF, or let's say what makes Deardorff so special over the other LFs?
    It's old and heavy. A lot has happened since Deardorff designs saw the light of day.
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  40. #40
    zzyzx
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    So what did you finally purchase?

    After years of many different cameras I like my Deardorffs. Second choice for field work for ME would be Canham. If weight didn't matter and I wanted low cost I would get the old Calumet 'Green Monster'. Bombproof, heavy and it works forever and is very cheap on the used market.

    One lens, a 300 NikkorM for low cost and good quality or a new Cooke Triple Convertible if cost were no object.

    Ten holders and a changing back along with a Ries tripod, Pentax digital spot meter and you are in business. The dark cloth I can make easily using wind/waterproof cloth and microfleece so I have wind, rain and cold emergency blanket in the darkcloth... with a black side and a light gray-white side.

    Add in one nice loupe to help with focus and I am ready to go.

    For processing, 8x10 to 11x14 trays, Hake brush, Sandy Kings Pyrocat HD developer and a green safelight coupled to a foot switch and I can develop any B&W film by inspection and never a scratch on the film. Slow, but one at a time gives me the darkroom time to contemplate and enjoy the process as well as the image. Contact printing frame, Lodima paper(now that my Azo stock is dwindling) and I am in business.

    Can put a low cost kit together like this for well under $1000 US. By shopping around and getting lucky I can put it all together for half that if I don't mind waiting and hunting for stuff.

    Either way, nothing compared to a fine contact print. Get it right in camera, process and print and show fine images.

    Need a source for developing by inspection and some top inspiration? Take a workshop for this type of workflow at http://www.michaelandpaula.com as this husband and wife team are excellent. They work this way and are good teachers. Their workshop is worth every penny and then some.

    Let us know what you ended up with for a working rig.

  41. #41
    zzyzx
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    The comments on Deardorff reflect the quality of the cameras. The work, work well and last. They are worth the price you pay as long as you get one that has focus gearing that isn't worn out. That can be replaced.

    There is nothing quite like a Deardorff. A piece of history that works well still for LF photography. Built well and built to last. There are newer cameras but most are not as nice as a good Deardorff.

    In newer wood field cameras you can get Ebony and sell the kids to pay for it. If I were buying a new field camera among the modern offerings I would look at Canham and the models made by Richard Ritter, camera repair whiz and innovator. Philips are nice but bellows limited for what I do though many love them and don't need 30 inches of bellows draw.

    I would absolutely, positively stay away from anything named Wisner. Way too much baggage and shoddy workmanship came from that company and it really drags down the few good ones made in the mess. Too much chance of getting a turkey with poorly fitted and finished pieces. Why take the chance when there are so many nice cameras on the market?

    Wood field cameras are nice and Deardorff is one most look at when they attempt design and manufacturing of newer models.

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    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    It's worth to mention that Deardorffs are heavy beasts. Most modern wood field makers try to make lighter cameras. Something's got to give.
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    It should also be mentioned that deardorffs have tiny -- and I mean tiny -- lock knobs... But that aside, I agree there's a beauty to them. Of course I see as much beauty in a Chamonix or Ebony, but that's me...
    Jack
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    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Senior Member Don Hutton's Avatar
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    Re: Starting 8x10 view camera

    I've owned just about every modern 8x10 camera and a bunch of older one's too (including what must be the most beautifully restored Deardorff on the planet) and shot with all of them in a studio environment and in the field. It's my opinion that the Chamonix 8x10 is an outstanding combination of features, build quality and design for an excellent price. If I were still shooting 8x10, I'd have one...

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