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Thread: Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

  1. #1
    jifjif
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    Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

    I been using my UV/IR filter on it just for protection but I need to get a polarizer for it.

    Thinking about getting circular polarizer. Any particular favorites?

    And one last beginner question:
    Linear or circular / wide or not wide?

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Re: Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

    You don't need a circular polarizer. You only need a circular polarizer if you have another polarizing surface on the image side of the polarizer, like the semi-silvered parts of the mirror in AF SLR's.

    Leica makes a polarizer which is a swing out one. You compose after swinging the polarizer 180 degrees, so it's in front of the viewfinder window, turn the polarizer until you have the effect you want, and then swing it back over the lens through 180 degrees. The effect is symmetrical through 180 degrees, so now your lens sees the same effect you saw through the polarizer.

    Cheaper way is to get a filter adapter for something like a 72mm filter on a 46mm lens, and then use a dremel tool to make a hole so that you can see through the adapter (figure out where to make the hole after mounting the adapter on the lens). Then you buy whatever 72mm polarizer, put it in the adapter and see the polarization effect through the hole you made. It looks slightly clunky because of the size of the filter, but it works. 72mm tends to be OK because it doesn't block the rangefinder window.

    Henning

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    Subscriber Member jaapv's Avatar
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    Re: Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

    I'm quite pleased with the Leica swing-up one. It comes with adapters to use it on different lenses. The main drawback is that the assembly takes up more place than a simple filter.
    JAAP
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    The colours of my generation are black and white.

  4. #4
    jifjif
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    Re: Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

    Thanks both for comments.

    I got a cir polarizer to use and yes it does make things slightly more saturated but noticed the moiré patterns on certain shots where there is a uniformity in shapes (lines / bricks on building etc).

    I guess I should only really use it when shooting on reflective surface (water, glass etc).

    Any suggestion on good all around filter? Have skylight and UV/IR filters but they dont seem to make things more defined or saturated like cir polar.

    Should I just stick to ND filter for all around use?

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    Subscriber Member jaapv's Avatar
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    Re: Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

    Moiré effects? that can hardly have anything to do with a polfilter. The main purpose of such a filter is not to remove reflections, but, by removing reflections intensify the colors of your image. It can indeed double as an ND filter. You should not remove the IR cut filter on an M8 when using a polfilter. As photographic polfilters do not filter in the IR band, the net effect is magnifying the IR component by a factor 2-3.
    JAAP
    http://www.jaapvphotography.eu
    The colours of my generation are black and white.

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    Re: Polarizing Filters (for 50 lux)

    Quote Originally Posted by jaapv View Post
    I'm quite pleased with the Leica swing-up one. It comes with adapters to use it on different lenses. The main drawback is that the assembly takes up more place than a simple filter.
    I use the Leica universal as well. It's a Rube Goldberg contraption, but it's really the best way to do it on an RF. Very similar to the Mamiya solution (I have the Mamiya setup for the 7II). There are other options as well, but they get increasingly "fidgety." (e.g. using two filters with marks on the rim, etc.)

    Our friend John has a good review of it up:

    http://www.pebbleplace.com/Personal/...Polarizer.html

    The biggest downside is the size. Forget about tucking the case in a camera bag... Unless you've got plenty of space! I usually toss mine in a circular, screw-together type filter case designed for a similarly-sized contraption (the Canon CPL for the super-teles). About as compact as you can get - and that's not saying much.

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