Site Sponsors
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 51 to 70 of 70

Thread: Amateur question about leica lens

  1. #51
    Senior Member thrice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    Oh goody! A book full of numbers! ;-)
    I don't think you looked, because it is very graphical and explains the information clearly and concisely.

  2. #52
    Not Available
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,864
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by SYGTAFOTO View Post
    For those who don't use filters because it degrades image quality, I wonder if they can tell from images whether or not they were taken with filters...
    As a matter of fact, yes.

    Green blob, courtesy of a B+W 010 UV. Which is MRC coated. Heavily coated, even.


  3. #53
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Godfrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near San Jose, California
    Posts
    7,930
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by thrice View Post
    I don't think you looked, because it is very graphical and explains the information clearly and concisely.
    I've actually had that document for some years. It's still a book full of numbers. I enjoy such things, perhaps you don't understand that.

  4. #54
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    430
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    I have some of the original Kodak data books on the Wratten series of filters, from the 1960s. And a box of Wratten filters. Useful for some of the color conversion and Visible-blocking filters. Such things as the 87c, 88a, etc.

    Anyone doing Infrared photography might find them useful. As stated before, under extreme lighting situalions it is best to remove the filter. Extreme backlighting is a good example. That's where a quick review on a digital camera is helpful. Chances are the UV contamination will blur the image shot without a filter more than any distortions caused by the filter glass under most shooting conditions.

    It should also be noted that the OP is asking about taking pictures of his Kids, and is not a professional being paid to do an assignment. Under the latter, where the pictures are to be published- the cost of the equipment is small in comparison with the income it generates. I am not going to ruin a lens using it to take vacation shots, I keep a filter on it.

  5. #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    GTA, Canada
    Posts
    587
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Double Negative View Post
    As a matter of fact, yes.

    Green blob, courtesy of a B+W 010 UV. Which is MRC coated. Heavily coated, even.

    Flare is one story but image resolution is another. What you reference from my reply is the latter. If you see two images, one with filter, and one without, and tell them apart based on quality/resolution, I would be impressed.
    Sure, there is a theoretically higher probably for flare with a filter, but benefits far outweighs drawbacks.. at least for me.
    Scott

  6. #56
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Godfrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near San Jose, California
    Posts
    7,930
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian S View Post
    ... I am not going to ruin a lens using it to take vacation shots, I keep a filter on it.
    In forty+ years of doing photography, I've not yet ruined a lens ... or a filter when I've used them. But even if you happened to ruin a lens once ... Why be so afraid?

    I think the "filter as protection" mindset leads to more casual mishandling and damage through a false sense of security than being confident that you can handle and take care of your equipment without having these placebos in place to reassure you.

  7. #57
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    3,848
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    I don't think it's fear, it's just a preference. There is no right or wrong, either way.

    If you want to buy a filter as insurance, or not, that's ok by me.

    If you don't want to buy health insurance, ok by me, too. I'm not sure not having health insurance will lead to more chance of damaged health.

  8. #58
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    GTA, Canada
    Posts
    587
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    In forty+ years of doing photography, I've not yet ruined a lens ... or a filter when I've used them. But even if you happened to ruin a lens once ... Why be so afraid?

    I think the "filter as protection" mindset leads to more casual mishandling and damage through a false sense of security than being confident that you can handle and take care of your equipment without having these placebos in place to reassure you.
    I think this thread is going to the same end as any other filter threads.
    we all talk about our experiences and tell those who don't agree with you that they are wrong.

    It's a personal preference really.

    But I do have to say ruining a filter feels much better in my wallet than ruining a lens, and I take of my lenses as best as I can with or without a filter.
    Scott

  9. #59
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Godfrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near San Jose, California
    Posts
    7,930
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    I'm sure it will go the way of all threads that incite dogma and belief. :-)

    I use filters for a purpose. Insurance or protection are rarely a justifying purpose for a filter, in my opinion. And besides, replacing the front element of a lens isn't all that expensive anyway, only a little moreso than buying high quality filters. Lenses can be repaired pretty easily, you know ...

    I'll bow out of the debate now.

  10. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    408
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    and i"ve got my answer so 'over and out'

  11. #61
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    23,623
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2555

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Not sure why some folks took offense here to folks opinions but my choice has been not to use them. I think there certainly valid reasons either way myself. I have always been in the camp of taking the risk and not use them since optically there is no benefit too using them so why bother but of course they do offer protection to maybe save a lens element but since they don't provide a optical advantage than I chose not to use them. It's actually a pretty simple decision if you want protection use them if you are willing to take the risk than don't. But bottom line optically there is not a advantage to use them. And yes they do cause some issues but my choice is always go with the optical advantage be it perceived or real.

  12. #62
    Rob Martin
    Guest

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    I'm with Guy.......

  13. #63
    Senior Member thrice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    I'd prefer that everyone else doesn't use filters.

  14. #64
    Senior Member thrice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    besides, replacing the front element of a lens isn't all that expensive anyway
    To quote Leica for a new element in a 90mm Summicron ASPH:

    400 to 450 Euro.

  15. #65
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    430
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Having the front element of a collapsible Summicron polished and recoated ran $200. The coating damage was severe enough to render the lens unusable. Looks great now. Another Summicron of the same age used with a filter for its 50 year life, perfect.

    I've replaced front elements of lenses myself. Doing it for a Leica lens is a little more difficult than for a Jupiter-3. I had to machine out the fixture of a Type I Rigid Summicron to fit in the new front element. They were fit and finish, all almost individually made. I had to try three different front elements to get a good match. The individual optics are matched to the fixture. Same with the early Sonnars: the serial number of each of the three groups is machined into the brass fixtures for each.

  16. #66
    Senior Member thrice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Sorry, I assumed from the title that the original poster was referring to current production Leica lenses. Sure if you have a sub $1000 used Leica lens then protecting and the potential repair costs are less of an issue. Be aware, however, that Leica will not repair much older lenses and I assume you had your collapsible cron recoated by focal point or a similar third party Brian?

  17. #67
    Senior Member Y.B.Hudson III's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    314
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Yehh, valuable info here.... I now know whom not to buy used lenses from in the future
    Last edited by Y.B.Hudson III; 15th December 2011 at 02:47.

  18. #68
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    belgļe
    Posts
    1,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by thrice View Post
    Sorry, I assumed from the title that the original poster was referring to current production Leica lenses. Sure if you have a sub $1000 used Leica lens then protecting and the potential repair costs are less of an issue. Be aware, however, that Leica will not repair much older lenses and I assume you had your collapsible cron recoated by focal point or a similar third party Brian?
    where did you get this info from?

    Leica just repaired a version one (1960's), 8-element 35mm Cron for me which had a loose front element. they never said anything about the lens being "too old."

  19. #69
    Senior Member thrice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Sorry, I meant to type "will not replace elements in much older lenses" since that is the absolute topic of the discussion I guess I thought my meaning was assumed, but thanks for picking up on it so that I could clarify.

  20. #70
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    430
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Amateur question about leica lens

    Quote Originally Posted by thrice View Post
    Sure if you have a sub $1000 used Leica lens then protecting and the potential repair costs are less of an issue. Be aware, however, that Leica will not repair much older lenses and I assume you had your collapsible cron recoated by focal point or a similar third party Brian?
    Focalpoint is THE best service for this... and the work they did on my early "Hot Glass" Collapsible Summicron was amazing. Looked like wax paper going in, came back like new. Amazing.

    The OP has an older Elmarit. The earlier Leica lenses have a much softer coating than new ones. If this lens was used with a filter, even one made by "Soligor", it explains why the lens looks good and not like wax paper.

    Finding replacement front elements for 50 year old lenses is not easy. I traded "repair work" for parts lenses to get enough parts to repair a Rigid Summicron and a Collapsible Summicron. The 1950s Leica lenses are "fit and finish", almost every one is individual.

    New stuff is easily replaced. It's new, and it just takes money. Just buy another one. Fortunately for users of vintage equipment, we have Focalpoint. A one of a kind resource for older lenses.
    Last edited by Brian S; 16th December 2011 at 01:15.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •