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Thread: Film Medium Format accessories

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    Film Medium Format accessories

    Hey all,

    I am waiting to get my film medium format cameras sooner or later, but i just ordered the bodies without anything, so i would like to start questions:

    1. For Hasselblad 501C/M, what lenses do you recommend? I want to have only 1 or 2 no more.

    2. What film back/magazine should i get for that Hasselblad above?

    3. For Mamiya RZ67 ProII, what lenses do you recommend me to look at [1-2 lenses]?

    4. What film back you recommend for that RZ67 II?

    5. What film media you recommend to use with those film bodies, let's say for outdoor and indoor [Landscape, portraiture,...]?

    6. What scanner do you recommend to use for the film?

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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    These are my .02 only:

    For the Hassy I'd get the A12 backs -- IMO the lower shot-count off 120 is preferable to 220 because the paper backing does help light-sealing and film-flatness. Others may disagree however. I'd only shoot 6x6 with that camera as you can crop to 645 later and only give up a few frames per roll over the A16 back.

    For the RZ, I'd again only shoot 6x7 fill frame format to utilize the maximum are of the negative. For lenses it really depends on what you want to shoot. Note there are a few generations of each lens, and generally speaking the latest generations are superior to the earlier verions, but not hugely. My favorites were the 50, 75 shift -- and I'd get the short barrel version and the TS adapter today instead of the dedicated shift lens -- and finally, believe it or not, the 100-200 zoom -- it was as good as all the primes it replaced.

    My last favored emulsions were all color neg as they scanned very well: Kodak Portra VC 160 for full color, NC 160 for a muted color palette and Fuji 160 Pro -- all three were excellent.

    For a scanner, I'd optimally suggest a big-boy Imacon, but they're pricey. Next choice is a Nikon 2000 with the glass neg tray. Note that I have a mint as new copy of the latter complete with the glass tray and I am ready to sell it as I rarely scan any more. PM me if you are interested.
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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    These are my .02 only:

    For the Hassy I'd get the A12 backs -- IMO the lower shot-count off 120 is preferable to 220 because the paper backing does help light-sealing and film-flatness. Others may disagree however. I'd only shoot 6x6 with that camera as you can crop to 645 later and only give up a few frames per roll over the A16 back.

    For the RZ, I'd again only shoot 6x7 fill frame format to utilize the maximum are of the negative. For lenses it really depends on what you want to shoot. Note there are a few generations of each lens, and generally speaking the latest generations are superior to the earlier verions, but not hugely. My favorites were the 50, 75 shift -- and I'd get the short barrel version and the TS adapter today instead of the dedicated shift lens -- and finally, believe it or not, the 100-200 zoom -- it was as good as all the primes it replaced.

    My last favored emulsions were all color neg as they scanned very well: Kodak Portra VC 160 for full color, NC 160 for a muted color palette and Fuji 160 Pro -- all three were excellent.

    For a scanner, I'd optimally suggest a big-boy Imacon, but they're pricey. Next choice is a Nikon 2000 with the glass neg tray. Note that I have a mint as new copy of the latter complete with the glass tray and I am ready to sell it as I rarely scan any more. PM me if you are interested.
    Hey Jack,

    Thank you very much for your helpful answers!

    Yes, almost all people who answered me that recommended me A12, and to be honest, i want to use it as 6x6 for hasselblad or 6x7 for mamiya and not planning to crop to 6x4.5 format, i have H3DII which is almost 6x4.5 and in the future i will buy a Phase One digital back so no need to get film back of 6x4.5, and i can crop by software when needed.

    About lenses, let's say i am decided already which lenses i want on long side, but for wide side i am still torn between 40, 50, 60/65 focal lengths, many recommend me 50 for hasselblad and waiting for mamiya.

    About the scanner, i am still not sure about it, because i may plan to get a large format camera, so i prefer if that scanner i would buy can scan for medium format and large format.

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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    1. If you are just going to get one lens, the 80mm is excellent and versatile. It can be used for portraits, landscapes, and it is very good up close if you have extension tubes. If you are going to get two lenses, a 50mm and a 150mm are good choices -- one is a good standard wide angle, and the 150mm is the standard portrait/telephoto lens. Or if you are contrarian, you could go for a 60mm and 120mm -- the 60mm is the sharpest wide angle (not too wide...kind of like a 35mm or so). The 120mm is a macro lens and very very sharp in close and out to several meters. It is not as good at infinity (this is not to say it is bad).

    2. A12 -- there are not many 220 films available anymore, and only one black and white (Tri-x) I think. The A12 is the easiest to find and the most useful.

    3 + 4 -- Sorry, don't use these cameras. Is there any reason you are getting both? It seems a bit odd...your resources might be better spent on focusing on just one system.

    5. I have to disagree with Jack (completely), I have never met a color negative film that I like. They all just seem grainy with muted colors to me. For color, I would recommend E100G for a great normal color film, Astia for lower contrast and portraiture, and Provia 400X for higher ISO. For black and white, I prefer the Fuji films, but Kodak and Ilford are great too. I would go for Fuji Acros for the ultimate in tonality and resolution and Neopan 400 for higher speed.

    6. The scanner really depends on how committed you are to film. If you really intend to shoot a lot and make prints from them, the Imacons are great. If you are still pretty serious about it, but don't want to spend that much, the Nikon Jack mentioned is good. If you can find one, I would recommend the Minolta Scan Multi Pro -- it was superb, it's just too bad Konica Minolta left the photo sector.
    If you are just giving it a try, and don't want to outlay too much cash, try an Epson flatbed like the V700. More than good enough for the web and small prints, and much cheaper than any other option. It would also handle large format. The only others that can do that are the Imacons or much harder to find professional flatbed and drum scanners.
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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Richardson View Post
    1. If you are just going to get one lens, the 80mm is excellent and versatile. It can be used for portraits, landscapes, and it is very good up close if you have extension tubes. If you are going to get two lenses, a 50mm and a 150mm are good choices -- one is a good standard wide angle, and the 150mm is the standard portrait/telephoto lens. Or if you are contrarian, you could go for a 60mm and 120mm -- the 60mm is the sharpest wide angle (not too wide...kind of like a 35mm or so). The 120mm is a macro lens and very very sharp in close and out to several meters. It is not as good at infinity (this is not to say it is bad).

    2. A12 -- there are not many 220 films available anymore, and only one black and white (Tri-x) I think. The A12 is the easiest to find and the most useful.

    3 + 4 -- Sorry, don't use these cameras. Is there any reason you are getting both? It seems a bit odd...your resources might be better spent on focusing on just one system.

    5. I have to disagree with Jack (completely), I have never met a color negative film that I like. They all just seem grainy with muted colors to me. For color, I would recommend E100G for a great normal color film, Astia for lower contrast and portraiture, and Provia 400X for higher ISO. For black and white, I prefer the Fuji films, but Kodak and Ilford are great too. I would go for Fuji Acros for the ultimate in tonality and resolution and Neopan 400 for higher speed.

    6. The scanner really depends on how committed you are to film. If you really intend to shoot a lot and make prints from them, the Imacons are great. If you are still pretty serious about it, but don't want to spend that much, the Nikon Jack mentioned is good. If you can find one, I would recommend the Minolta Scan Multi Pro -- it was superb, it's just too bad Konica Minolta left the photo sector.
    If you are just giving it a try, and don't want to outlay too much cash, try an Epson flatbed like the V700. More than good enough for the web and small prints, and much cheaper than any other option. It would also handle large format. The only others that can do that are the Imacons or much harder to find professional flatbed and drum scanners.
    I think i will go with 2 lenses on each body, but i will not decide yet as many lenses can be great and i am sure they all can be used great for what i shoot [landscapes, portraits].

    OK, i just will buy that A12 for Hasselblad sooner or later, just a matter of time.

    I bought 2 cameras used, was cheaper, and i was confused to which to get, i loved the weight and design of Hasselblad and i like the larger sensor of Mamiya [6x7 against 6x6], also that Mamiya was so popular for many pros in studio than Hasselblad 5xx series [i could be wrong], so that to stop confusing i bought them both.

    About the film to be used, hmmmmm, it seems there is nothing as a standard, but i can use many film for some desirable results, i am sure i will love all or most results, i will choose few different films, at least they are cheap and i will not shoot many, so i will choose 3-4 different film media and give them a try, and sure what you recommend or Jack all can be handy.

    Scanner.....?!!! Maybe i should keep the film and think about the scanner later, i will check with local labs here if they can do print film for me in cheap, otherwise for long end i think i better go with a scanner, who knows, maybe some local labs here using cheapo scanners as well so not worthy to waste on them when i can do the same or better, but before i spend money on scanner i have to be sure that i will use my film more often.

    Thanks!

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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    Quote Originally Posted by Professional View Post
    About the scanner, i am still not sure about it, because i may plan to get a large format camera, so i prefer if that scanner i would buy can scan for medium format and large format.
    If you're even considering LF, then by all means, you should look hard at the Imacon's -- IMO they are the best thing going for convenience.
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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    If you're even considering LF, then by all means, you should look hard at the Imacon's -- IMO they are the best thing going for convenience.
    Imacon is that from Hasselblad you mean?

    In fact i can buy that scanner only if i started to save for it until 1 year and i don't buy anything else like lenses, light, accessories,.... otherwise i will never buy it, too bad i am looking to buy Canon EF600mm and another "New" Hasselblad HC lens [either the macro or one zoom], those 2 only will eat my budget very quick, even i am not sure if i will buy the LF and when.

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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    I read a whole bunch of reviews and compared scanners within my budget quite closely (Imacons are not within my budget), and in the end I found that the undeniable edge the Nikon 9000 has over the Epson V750 Pro flatbed was visible, but, for me, not significant enough to lay out that much extra money, so I got the V750. I am quite happy with it, and there are tricks available to get more out of what it can do, like custom negative holders, etc. If you are looking at a cheap way to evaluate the whole thing, the V750 is nice. Ultimately, if you want to be really serious about it, I guess it is an Imacon, considering that the Nikon doesn't do anything larger than 6x6.
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    Re: Film Medium Format accessories

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    I read a whole bunch of reviews and compared scanners within my budget quite closely (Imacons are not within my budget), and in the end I found that the undeniable edge the Nikon 9000 has over the Epson V750 Pro flatbed was visible, but, for me, not significant enough to lay out that much extra money, so I got the V750. I am quite happy with it, and there are tricks available to get more out of what it can do, like custom negative holders, etc. If you are looking at a cheap way to evaluate the whole thing, the V750 is nice. Ultimately, if you want to be really serious about it, I guess it is an Imacon, considering that the Nikon doesn't do anything larger than 6x6.
    Maybe the best idea i should do is that i go with Epson V750 now, and later when i can afford i go with Imacon, who knows what we will see in the future but it seems it is no plan to go for better scanners for film, so the only hope is that the Imacon prices go down more than now even with rebates.

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