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Thread: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I thought that might be useful to post a micro review of the Hasselblad HTS 1.5 - user experience on the web has been scarce - there is a dearth of information on it in actual use.

    What is it? The HTS is a tilt-shift adapter that fits between the H3D (and presumably the H4D) body and the current generation of Hasselblad digital prime lenses from focal length 28 through 100mm. It provides 10 degrees of tilt and 18mm of shift, both on a single axis. The HTS rotates which effectively permits various combinations of horizontal and vertical shift or tilt. The shift and tilt functions are at right angles to each other, which is generally a useful configuration for landscape and architecture. The HTS includes an optical element that acts as a 1.5x focal length extender and expands the image circle to cover the shift area. The 28mm becomes a 43mm, which is roughly equivalent to a 28 T/S in 35mm format. Here's a link to Hasselblad's data sheet.

    HTS 1.5 datasheet

    In use the HTS offers a key advantage over digital "view" cameras like the Alpa and the Horseman: you can actually see what you are doing. You can see the effects of tilt and shift through the viewfinder and compose, focus and frame accurately. The HTS results in 1 stop of light loss; I use the waist level finder (which is brighter than the eye level finder because it doesn't employ a prism) to compensate for this. In this configuration the Hasselblad is totally manual so I carry a light meeter and adjust exposure based on the camera's histogram display. The waist level finder is a nuisance in portrait orientation but it's not really worse than the eye level finder.

    The key disadvantage to this setup is that the 28mm + HTS or 80mm + HTS are not digitars. Performance is outstanding centered, but is not comparable to the digitars shifted, at least not beyond 10 mm or so. By the way the mts curves in the data sheet suggest that the performance of the 28mm and 80mm with the HTS is better than the other focal lengths. This is consistent with my experience.

    I've images in the following posts.

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    First, here is an image showing the effect on the plane of focus of 3 degrees of tilt. i've included a crop which is representative of what is happening across the entire frame. This is with the 28mm (effectively a 43 with the HTS) at f16:

    Attachment 22797


    Attachment 22798

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Here's another example of tilt in use: a bowl of fruit using tilt to narrow the apparent depth of field on the one hand and to expand the apparent depth of field on the other. 100mm + HTS at f3.4

    Attachment 22800

    Attachment 22799

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    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Nice review Woody . Like to see this in action
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    In this case if I set up centered on the barn the tree on thee right would block more than half of the barn. I set up to the left of the center of the barn (you can see this in the placement of the cupola on the top of the barn) and used 16mm of shift and some rotation to center the barn without creating converging horizontals and to minimize the foreground. I've also included a crop from the upper right that demonstrates reasonable resolution in the portion of the image brought into play by the shift. This is the 28mm plus HTS (effectively 43mm) at f16. Stopping down really helps this combination

    Attachment 22801

    Attachment 22802

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Proof that there is sometimes interesting light out my dining room window. This is a stitch of two landscape format images created by shifting the HTS

    Attachment 22804

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    And finally the bad news: the brick wall test out my dining room window. Shifted 15 cm (the lens was shifted to the left). Note the uncorrected cyan shift on the left. This is the 28mm +HTS at f11 or so. I've included crops centered and at 10mm shift and 15mm shift. The later is unimpressive compared to a digitar. The full 18mm shift results in vignetting and significant cyan shift.Yet somehow I've managed to get good results in actual use in less demanding situations.

    Attachment 22805

    Attachment 22806

    Attachment 22807

    Attachment 22808

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    A few concluding thoughts.

    The shift seems to work best if you limit it to 10mm or so and handle any uncorrected convergences in PS - this seems to provide a better result than relying solely on PS or solely on large shifts.

    The tilt feature is terrific, and as far as I know is not otherwise available in MF.

    Kudos to Hasselblad for coming up with technically difficult solutions to serious technical issues: the multi shot backs for museums and the like, a very large segment of the MF market; the HTS for architecture, not perfect but it offers a high level of usability; and now the focus and recompose feature of the H4D.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Thanks very much for the review Woody.

    To correct the Cyan shift you could always shoot a custom white shot?

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Thanks Woody - very interesting and much appreciated.

    Pete

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by David Grover / Hasselblad View Post
    Thanks very much for the review Woody.

    To correct the Cyan shift you could always shoot a custom white shot?
    David - The position of the HTS adjustments is recorded in the exif data and Phocus uses the information to correct for color shifts. The makes using the HTS radically easier than shifting the Horseman, where you need a custom white shot for every shift. What you're seeing in the image is a bit of uncorrected cyan shift.

    I didn't have the wit to shoot shifted through a white diffuser to really test this. I'll do so later today and post.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Campbell View Post
    David - The position of the HTS adjustments is recorded in the exif data and Phocus uses the information to correct for color shifts. The makes using the HTS radically easier than shifting the Horseman, where you need a custom white shot for every shift. What you're seeing in the image is a bit of uncorrected cyan shift.

    I didn't have the wit to shoot shifted through a white diffuser to really test this. I'll do so later today and post.
    Hi Woody,

    Well not quite. The information in the HTS is used to correct for CA, Vignetting and Distortion. If you have any lens induced color shift then a custom white may be needed. It just is not needed that often!

    Best,


    David

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    Workshop Member Woody Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Thanks for the clarification. Maybe there is an opportunity to do something with the issue in Phocus 2 or beyond - the information provided by the camera is theoretically sufficient to permit Phocus to correct for color shifts.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Thanks for taking the time of doing this.
    I was really looking forward reading such real field report of the HTS 1.5.
    I own a Cambo Ultima that I'm using with a 47mm digitar and a 22mpix Hassy back. Difficult to say for sure but I think a 15mm shift on the Cambo gives better results than the 10mm shift with the HTS. I'm quite disappointed with those crops. I also see some noise in it which makes the distortion and loss of sharpness a bit less easy to read. Did you make those pictures at 200/400isos ? Which back are you using (if I can ask) ?

    Thanks again for this report.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Woody,
    Thanks for posting your HTS 1.5 review thoughts and some sample shots. It does look like the tilt is very nice. The shift looks acceptable. We know it may not be as good or long shift as something like a Cambo, but then the Hassy provides a lot of other features and capabilities that the view camera does not, thus making it much more versatile. I think for folks that require shift all the time, the view camera may be a good solution, but for all around versatility, the Hassy with the HTS does more than a respectable job, IMHO.

    The only caveat that we have to live with is the 1.5x multiplier with this device. The reasons have been explained and detailed elsewhere, so not need to rehash. It just would be nice if it was possible create a device, other than a true view camera, that permitted the movements without so much of the additional magnification. That being said, the HTS still seems like a very nice solution in the Hassy kit.

    My next thoughts are wondering what the planned Leica 30mm tilt/shift lens is going to produce. The Hassy solution provided the ability to use with a few lenses, which is very practical, compared to having dedicated lenses for the solution (like the Canon 17mm TS-E, the 24mm TS-E, the 45mm and the 90mm TS-Es also).

    LJ

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    Senior Member KeithL's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Woody, many thanks for the review; very interesting.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by anGy View Post
    Thanks for taking the time of doing this.
    I was really looking forward reading such real field report of the HTS 1.5.
    I own a Cambo Ultima that I'm using with a 47mm digitar and a 22mpix Hassy back. Difficult to say for sure but I think a 15mm shift on the Cambo gives better results than the 10mm shift with the HTS. I'm quite disappointed with those crops. I also see some noise in it which makes the distortion and loss of sharpness a bit less easy to read. Did you make those pictures at 200/400isos ? Which back are you using (if I can ask) ?

    Thanks again for this report.
    39 m back. ISO 100. I'm certain that you are correct about the digitar at 15 out performing the HTS at 10.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    curious just why the zooms and longer primes are not recommended with the HTS

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    curious just why the zooms and longer primes are not recommended with the HTS
    Even that 120 Macro is not compatible with it, weird.
    Tareq

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    maybe its the depth of the back of the lens, when I rented the HTS its pretty flat where you mount it to the lens.
    www.williamophuis.com

    Hassy H4D-40.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    The crop ratio was probably dictated by the 28 "D" coverage.

    Will Ophuis may be right about the closeness of the rear optic on the HTS, but it says "not recommended", as opposed to "Do NOT Use", which leads me to believe it is an optical quality thing. I'll have a look today ... I haven't used the HTS with the Multi-Shot camera yet, and am itching to do so.

    The other aspect may be that the size/weight of the Zooms, 120 Macro, and 210 which do not have tripod collars ... so they may not be the best idea mounted to the little HTS ... that is a ton of weight hanging out there on the HTS mount.

    -Marc

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I just finished a session with the following combination, HC210, 56mm extender & the HTS.

    Damn....! I just realized I should have tried putting the extender below the HTS. I had some issues with the HTS in vertical positions and my remote camera trigger plug

    BTW. Session went fine though DoF is non-existent. You can tilt whatever you want and still nothing or next to nothing. The combination does vignet when you go beyond something like 8degrees.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Dustbak View Post
    I just finished a session with the following combination, HC210, 56mm extender & the HTS.

    Damn....! I just realized I should have tried putting the extender below the HTS. I had some issues with the HTS in vertical positions and my remote camera trigger plug

    BTW. Session went fine though DoF is non-existent. You can tilt whatever you want and still nothing or next to nothing. The combination does vignet when you go beyond something like 8degrees.
    Finally, someone had the guts to try it ...


    Very interesting. The BIG question is why it isn't recommended? The most important one of the bunch is why not the 120 macro which would benefit most from tilts.


    I doubt you could mount the extender behind the HTS. Wouldn't that clip the image circle when using T/S?


    In studio I just trigger the camera from the computer, so have never run into the blocked access to the e-trigger cord. Maybe they need to come out with a L shaped flatter profile tip so the cord hangs downward? David Grovner ... are you listening?

    -Marc

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I will try the macro this afternoon as well as the extender in front of the HTS.

    I cannot trigger from the computer in this case. The setup was with a timing device.

    eg.
    Trigger 1: Open shutter
    Trigger 2: Drop 2 drops with x amount of millisec's in between
    Trigger 3: After x amount of millisec's fire flash.

    I had to trigger the setup remotely. I will look for a flat 3.5" monoplug and see if that works.

    This is the result (still not entirely happy but getting there)

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Nice one Dustbak!

    The reason why the 120 is not recommended is for performance reasons.

    Plus also if you want a 120 HTS, then simply use the HC80 and the smallest extension tube.

    That gives you 120 Macro.

    As Dustbak has found with the 210 then the tilt function has less or little effect.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Adding to that interesting review: the 120 macro will not attach physically to the HTS system. The lens barrel is too wide and the HTS mechanics are in the way.

    So, in short, it is not "recommended" because it will not mount.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Adding further to that review: here an image taken with the HCD 24 and the HTS on an H4D-50. 11.5mm shift to the top. There are some elements on the top right corner for your pixel peeping pleasure.


    Infineon Campeon technology park, Munich.


    Full resolution here.
    Last edited by jerome_m; 13th October 2014 at 09:08.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by jerome_m View Post
    Adding to that interesting review: the 120 macro will not attach physically to the HTS system. The lens barrel is too wide and the HTS mechanics are in the way.

    So, in short, it is not "recommended" because it will not mount.
    it does not mount directly but if used with an extention ring it will mount and can be used...

    Results were not great to be frank. This was with version I at that time, not sure how it woulc be with version II. I am not planning on testing this, much better results can be had with the 100 and extention rings.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Here are some more samples shot with an HTS on an H3dII 39.
    HCD 28, shift 11,4 mm, shutter 1/90, f/19


    HCD 28, shift 15,4 mm, rotation 90, shutter 1 min 4 sec, f/8.0


    HC 80, tilt 10.5, shutter 1/20, f/4.8

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I struggled with the HTS-just didn't do it for me-sold it and bought an Arca Swiss rm3di-very happy camper now
    Stanley

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I know this thread is kind of old but I'm thinking about getting one. One question I have is how hard is it to focus? I have a 28mm and 100mm that I would use with it.
    Thanks,
    Gale

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I have no problem focussing mine with both the 28 and 100 though I like the 80mm best with it for food work.
    Nick-T

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Anyone using the 24mm with the HTS? Any thoughts?

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    As an aside, and a bit off topic, I did find that the auto focus worked and worked well with the 28 HCD when the HTS was used with the Leica S2 when used with rise and shift. Can't speak to tilt since I didn't use it that way.

    Richard

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Thanks Nick, your comment is reassuring.
    rsmphoto- interesting, my understanding is auto focus doesn't work when the HTS is used on a Hasselblad.

    Mr.Gale

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Indeed, that's true. The AF never worked with the HTS on my H3DII-39, but it did when it was on my S2. I wasn't expecting it.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    I don't miss AF, shooting from a tripod.
    Remember, the H has only one focus point dead centre.
    Manual focus works fine for me.

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Regarding the manual focus on the HTS, I have no issue as others have stated and I am very comfortable with it; it's a tool that offers tremendous creativity.

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    Anyone using the 24mm with the HTS? Any thoughts?
    I use the 24mm on the HTS and I'm quite happy; here's an example from 2 years ago with an .75 ND Grad and .9 ND, at f22 for 11 seconds on my ancient H3DII39:



    Kind regards,
    Derek Jecxz
    derek jecxz {photographer}
    http://www.facebook.com/derek.jecxz.photographer
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Thanks, Derek.
    I see Jerome has also posted an example from the 24mm above, which I did not see before.
    How does the 24mm compare to the 28mm (focal length difference aside) on the HTS and by itself? Being a newer design, is the 24mm better across the frame?

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    The HCD 24 and HCD 28 are equally excellent and both work very well on the HTS. The 24 is interesting for its wider angle of view, that is about all.

    When used on the HTS, I found that the 24 was very difficult to focus. The lens aperture is only f/4.8 versus f/4.0 for the 28. That, and the bigger depth of field given by the shorter focal length makes it more difficult to focus, while I have no big problems with the 28. AF is not active with the HTS and any lens on H cameras.

    I posted some tests of the 24mm and 28mm here: “Field” test of Hasselblad H wide-angle lenses. and also there:

    24mm: HCD 4.8/24
    28mm: HCD 4/28

    For the tests, I used Phocus which corrects vignetting, distortion and chromatic aberration automatically.
    Last edited by jerome_m; 24th January 2015 at 03:27.
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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    In addition to Jerome's helpful info and link, I just remembered the below link with test shots and demonstration of DAC in Pocus; the tests are just a sort time after purchasing the 24mm:

    http://www.getdpi.com/forum/medium-f...scape-use.html

    Kind regards,
    Derek

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    With regards to the D series lenses, i.e. the 24mm and 28mm, when combined with the HTS1.5, I'm assuming that such a combination would cover full frame and not require a crop to the 1.1x sensor size of the 50mpx back? (I'm guessing the answer is yes because, after all, the unit is designed to increase the image circle of the lens... You just never know and better to ask!)

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    Re: Hasselblad HTS 1.5

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    With regards to the D series lenses, i.e. the 24mm and 28mm, when combined with the HTS1.5, I'm assuming that such a combination would cover full frame and not require a crop to the 1.1x sensor size of the 50mpx back? (I'm guessing the answer is yes because, after all, the unit is designed to increase the image circle of the lens... You just never know and better to ask!)
    The 24 and 28mm cover the full frame sensor size when mounted on the HTS (and more, to allow for shifting).
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