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Thread: Hassy H4D/40 Release

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by rmueller View Post
    Seems like only the H4D-60 has the double res (460320 pixel) 3" TFT display.

    Wondering why they don't have it in the 40 and 50 MP models ? Price ?

    Regards,
    Ralf
    Actually it's the same five year old, 3" 230K pixel used in a Canon 40D.
    Last edited by Bob; 15th June 2016 at 14:32.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by rmueller View Post
    Seems like only the H4D-60 has the double res (460320 pixel) 3" TFT display.

    Wondering why they don't have it in the 40 and 50 MP models ? Price ?

    Regards,
    Ralf
    As far as I know it will be on all H4Ds, not just the 40.

    -Marc

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    As far as I know it will be on all H4Ds, not just the 40.

    -Marc
    Maybe Dave can clarify, the specs on the H4D50 say 230k and for the H4D60
    say 460k (from the hasselblad.com site)
    I'm looking for excuses to trade-in my "old" H3DII-31, although the TFT res.
    is no killer argument, i'd like to know what the exact res. is. Oh well, maybe
    i just attend one of those upcoming events...

    Regards,
    Ralf

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by rmueller View Post
    Maybe Dave can clarify, the specs on the H4D50 say 230k and for the H4D60
    say 460k (from the hasselblad.com site)
    I'm looking for excuses to trade-in my "old" H3DII-31, although the TFT res.
    is no killer argument, i'd like to know what the exact res. is. Oh well, maybe
    i just attend one of those upcoming events...

    Regards,
    Ralf
    Darned if you aren't right ... the 50 specs say 230400 Pixels ... 1/2 the resolution of the 40 and 60.

    I wonder if that's because the 50 back was already in production and the 40/60 are new?

    -Marc

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Hi,

    The datasheet of the H4D-40 is available at
    http://www.hasselbladusa.com/media/2...tasheet_v1.pdf

    And....it's a 230k pixel display

    Regards,
    Ralf

  6. #56
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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    The current trade in program document on HasselbladUSA.com doesn't mention the H4D-40 .... I'm assuming that there will eventually be a trade in/up ???

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Anyone attended the Launch events? The reports I have seen so far have been very positive, but the camera looks like the H3dii...and the only innovation seems to be True Focus...wonder if Hassie will make that available to H3d as a firmware upgrade? Seems to me to be a software feature rather than a hardware one.

    Thoughts?

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    As I posted on LL

    You'd need a tilt/Yaw sensor so it's not just software..

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Read the thread over on LL as well as some of the online pdf's. Not sure why this technology is claimed to work better on wide angle lenses. Thought they typically had greater DOF than longer focal lengths. Not being a trigonometry guy I wonder what the actual adjustment in distance is when shooting (vertical) a full length shot of a model with a normal lens, i.e. the difference in distance between the focus on the eyes and the recomposed shot.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Have to agree I see this advantage from 80mm on up for sure.
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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    I got to play with one at the Launch Event in Miami. Very slick. True Focus works. Sounds like science-fiction but it actually works. Focus is very fast and the viewfinder is very bright. The TF button is on the back of the grip and the operation goes like this:

    Compose and focus pressing the TF button on the back of the grip. Release the button and recompose. Depress the shutter half-way and the camera will adjust for the positional change. Shoot the photo.

    Very easy to get used to.
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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David K View Post
    Read the thread over on LL as well as some of the online pdf's. Not sure why this technology is claimed to work better on wide angle lenses. Thought they typically had greater DOF than longer focal lengths. Not being a trigonometry guy I wonder what the actual adjustment in distance is when shooting (vertical) a full length shot of a model with a normal lens, i.e. the difference in distance between the focus on the eyes and the recomposed shot.
    I think you answered your own question about wide angle lenses ... the DOF is the saving grace for compensating inaccuracy.

    As for the amount of adjustment in distance for your model, a lot would depend on how still your model can be during your exposures so that the "True Focus" can function properly. For example, if you are shooting at F2.2 with a very shallow DOF, my understanding is that if the model has a tendency to rock slightly back and forth even by less than a centimeter, you will not be able to get the eyes perfectly in focus unless you have the uncanny ability to rock back and forth at the same frequency and in perfect sync with the model's motion, all while re-composing the shot. Another example is shooting infants or children or even pets and animals .... good luck in getting these subjects to remain perfectly still in order to reap the benefits of "True Focus".

    Unfortunately, the Hasselblad "True Focus" mechanism only attempts to measure the camera movement and not that of the subject. I find the Canon 1D predictive focus technology to be much more effective in practice, since it does not matter who or what is moving. For example, the Canon technology can track something moving in its frame as fast as 100 mph at a distance of about 50 feet, and continuously track it at 8fps capture rate. IMO, that is a much better example of "true focus" capability.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    I am really impressed of the ISO1600 posted here: http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/...dpost&p=346549
    Okay, it's just a single example, however that looks really promising.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Klepacki View Post
    I think you answered your own question about wide angle lenses ... the DOF is the saving grace for compensating inaccuracy.
    I went back and re-read the Hasselblad True Focus pdf (skimmed it too fast the first time) and now understand why they said this... see quote below.

    "a. The closer you are to the subject, the worse the original problem becomes. Consequently, the need for True Focus solution becomes greater and its application thereby becomes more noticeable.

    b. Short focal length ('wideangle') lenses naturally decrease camera to subject distances and therefore, following the point in (a), produce a greater need for True Focus adjustments."

    As far as Canon's (or Nikon's) AF systems I'd agree with you that they are head and shoulders better than any MF system I've ever shot with. When I focus and recompose with my Nikon (typically portrait mode for people shots) I move the AF point as close to the eyes as I can get it which results in less of a "focus error" than using the center focus point.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    David K, Here is a puzzle for you:

    The well-known 1/f rule for hand-held shutter speed indicates that the longer the focal length of the lens, the faster your shutter speed should be in order to overcome any shake/motion by the photographer. Yet, the Hasselblad "True Focus" literature implies the opposite in that adjusting for motion with longer focal lengths is not as critical as for wider focal lengths. Why is this? And, to be more specific, consider the following.

    If Hasselblad's claim is true about needing less focus correction with telephoto lenses, then shooting a 500mm lens at 1/15 would not need as much focusing care as shooting a 15mm lens at 1/15. Yet, we all know this to be not true. The angular displacements that occur during 1/15 second with a 500mm lens are much more severe than those experienced with a 15mm lens in the same duration. So, if angular displacement errors are much less of a concern with wide angle lenses via this observation, then why is "True Focus" needed more?

    Now, of course, if the shutter speed in my example above was changed to 1/500, then there would be much less of a visual difference, but the point of the example is that the camera movement here is simulated with longer exposure times, and more severe angular displacement of the subject occurs with a longer focal length (as born out via the 1/f rule), and this displacement occurs regardless of whether one is exposing during this displacement or not. So, why not a greater correction needed for telephoto lenses?

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    True Focus has nothing to do with shutter speeds, it is about compensating for focus errors caused by focus recompose. With a wide angle lens the change in angle (when re-composing) is greater than with a telephoto and therefore the correction needed is greater.
    Nick-T

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick-T View Post
    True Focus has nothing to do with shutter speeds, it is about compensating for focus errors caused by focus recompose. With a wide angle lens the change in angle (when re-composing) is greater than with a telephoto and therefore the correction needed is greater.
    Nick-T
    My point is about camera movement and corresponding relative angular displacement of the subject, which has everything to do with True Focus. In fact, a telephoto lens has a much narrower angle of view. For example, in 645 format a 200mm lens has roughly a 20 degree angle of view, while a 35mm lens has roughly a 90 degree angle of view. So, if the camera movement (when re-composing) is say 10 degrees, this would constitute a 50% change in angle relative to the 200mm lens, and only 11% change in angle relative to the 35mm lens. So, in fact the wide angle lens does not experience a greater change in angle.

    And, indeed this is the basis of the 1/f rule having to do with shutter speed selection and why a wide angle lens can be shot with greater clarity at the same (slower) shutter speed as compared to a telephoto lens. It is precisely because there is much LESS relative angular displacement that occurs with a wide angle lens due to camera movement. Whether this camera movement is due to mirror slap, shutter vibration and/or hand shake, it is a movement nevertheless and not any different than movement due to re-composing.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    movement due to re-composing effectively results in a changing camera to image distance of the point of interest only

    movement occurring during the open shutter is omnidirectional

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    David I'm not going to argue with you. I'm well aware of the 1/ rule for choosing shutter speeds and have had good success with it in 25 years of shooting for clients. I have also extensively tested the H4D40 and true focus (I'm shooting with it every day) and can assure you that the recompose focus error is much more evident when working close in with wide angle lenses than it is with a longer lens further away ie two different lens and the subject filling the frame to the same degree. Hope that makes sense.
    Nick-T

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Hi Nick, I did not mean to argue, so I hope you do not perceive it this way. I was only having some fun by stimulating some thought about the process. The important thing is that if it works for your type of shooting, then that is all that matters.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    movement due to re-composing effectively results in a changing camera to image distance of the point of interest only

    movement occurring during the open shutter is omnidirectional
    Yes, there may or may not be omnidirectional movement. The question is why should any movement be less critical for a telephoto lens than for a wide angle lens, especially when the relative angular displacement of a telephoto lens is always greater than for a wide angle lens for the same amount of camera movement.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    David, I appreciate your thoughts on the subject. I found this aspect of the True Focus counter-intuitive to how I thought it would work and wanted to understand it better.

    Nick, thanks for your input too. However it works Hassy get's my kudos for an innovative feature that has real world application for how and what I shoot. I'm looking forward to trying it for myself.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Hi All,

    As Nick says, the shutter speed has nothing to do with true focus. The True Focus correction simply applies an offest to the AF drive before the image is captured.

    The reason why it is less noticeable at longer lenses / distances, is due to the trigonometry. As you move further back / increase focal length, the angle decreases and therefore so does δ.

    See attachement!

    David

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Okay, help me out here RE: the True Focus concept.

    Isn't off-center recompose a known and well documented issue? Isn't it why the 35mm DSLR makers employ movable multiple focus points, and have been striving to improve the sensitivity of the off-cented focus points?

    The downside of the multiple focus points continues to be that they really are not out far enough from the center, don't always match where you want the focus point, and they still are not as sensitive as the center point ... and if solving all that were an easy task, wouldn't Canon/Nikon have done it already? Doesn't that indicate how difficult it would be to apply multiple focus points to Medium Format which is way farther away from the center?

    I use the multiple focus points on all of my 35mm DSLRs for thousands of wedding shots a month, so I'm very fast at it. Yet, it is an imperfect solution at best. You have to wheel the focus point to the subject ... which may or may not be where you want it. So you get as close as you can then re-compose anyway ... only now at least it's closer in terms of distance. But, again, I still almost always have to re-compose. And subject movement or camera movement is the same either way when using single AF point.

    This "True Focus" concept seems to solve those issues, at least in part, since it doesn't matter where the subject is in the composition ... you lock and re-compose without the time needed to wheel to a different focus point, then lock and re-compose like you do with a 35mm anyway. True Focus seems faster to me, and I dearly wish the 35mm DSLRs had this feature.

    That it is now available in Medium Format with it's more shallow DOF seems pretty useful to me.


    What I don't quite grasp is the role DOF plays in True Focus ... I get the differences between field-of-view of WA verses longer lenses, and made myself a "teaching aid" to show it ... where clearly the distance to off-center subject is greater with a WA field-of-view. On that chart are yellow lines that indicate distance ... what is missing is an overlay showing the effect of Depth-of-Field inherent with WA lenses verses longer lenses. I guess that would be possible, but you'd have to be pretty specific as which lenses, then map out DOF for each.

    The other thing is flatness of plane which seems more critical an issue with WA than long lenses. Wouldn't hitting the off center subject exactly with your focus point aid in that?

    Just wondering out loud, since I haven't actually tried True Focus and will reserve judgement. I just figure it can't hurt and I can focus as usual in some cases where the subject is close to the center.

    -Marc

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Marc - did we post at the same time?

    Have a look at this link on the Hasselblad site, and this will show what you are looking for...

    http://www.hasselblad.com/media/2234...difference.pdf

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Maybe this one also helps to understand why recomposing in general leads to "backfocus"...
    http://mhohner.de/images/recompose.gif
    ... and to understand that the larger the movements of the camera the more apparent the focus error will be.
    I understand that "True Focus" only compensates for "tilt", i.e. vertical recomposing (ist that correct?), however the basic principle is the same.
    Last edited by thomas; 15th February 2010 at 01:44.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    True Focus will compensate for landscape recomposing as well. As long as it is rotational it doesn't matter what plane it is in.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Grover / Hasselblad View Post
    True Focus will compensate for landscape recomposing as well. As long as it is rotational it doesn't matter what plane it is in.
    ah okay - thanks for clarifying!
    So on a tripod with non moving subjects it should work very, very well, I guess. Handhold you have to live with the movements of the subject and yourself... which is still one error factor less than with "regular" AF.
    If it works as it is supposed to be (obviously it does) this feature seems to be one of the most usefull recent "inovations" in MFD... IMHO.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    ah okay - thanks for clarifying!
    So on a tripod with non moving subjects it should work very, very well, I guess. Handhold you have to live with the movements of the subject and yourself... which is still one error factor less than with "regular" AF.
    If it works as it is supposed to be (obviously it does) this feature seems to be one of the most usefull recent "inovations" in MFD... IMHO.
    Yes, you are exactly right on all points.


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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Grover / Hasselblad View Post
    Marc - did we post at the same time?

    Have a look at this link on the Hasselblad site, and this will show what you are looking for...

    http://www.hasselblad.com/media/2234...difference.pdf
    Thanks David, that explains the DOF part pretty clearly. Since I am a wide open aperture shooter this could help a lot.

    I also cannot wait to try it with the 100/2.2 which I off-center focus wide open with a lot ... usually really close.

    I understand the issue of body sway or subject movement, but that's there anyway no matter what even if you manually focused and recomposed ... and it seems that this would mitigate that issue somewhat depending on which direction the movement is. Lots to explore with
    my new H4D/60 when and if it ever gets here (sorry, couldn't help it, I'm "so waiting" for the darned thing).

    -Marc

    Okay, here's another focus suggestion for you to forward to the Elves in Sweden or Denmark or where ever they now work ... dual select focus so you can pick a back point and a front point and the camera selects the correct f stop. Nothing new, but would be VERY useful ... and maybe that could even work with Manual focus using the HTS/1.5 huh?

    Yeah, I know, we're never satisfied ...

    Marc

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    I also cannot wait to try it with the 100/2.2 which I off-center focus wide open with a lot ... usually really close.
    I would think that's the acid test for many of us, it sure would be for me. From my non-technical perspective I would have thought that the ability to put the focus point anywhere in the frame would have been an easier problem to solve, but apparently not.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    So just reading some comments it really only works say if you are holding the camera straight the sensor pivots left and right and on vertical up and down BUT No vertical adjustment when held in a landscape mode. So if I had a subject say man in front of me focused on his eye's than tilted camera up for building it really would not work in this case. It is more the pivot going right and left.

    Do I have that correctly in my thoughts?

    Also Marc and David that illustration really shows the wide angle effects now compared to a longer lens. I was trying to wrap my head around it at first now I see it is more effective with a wide angle. So when testing this out maybe try a 28mm, 80mm and like a 150mm to see how that works in practice. Very interesting concept for sure
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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    At first this didn't seem much different from autofocus lock (that even dead systems like Contax have! :-)

    BUT, it now appears TF will adjust the focal point for a point (eyes) by using one or two pieces of info;
    the angle of tilt; this is enough if the subject and camera do not change planes (it would adjust a 45degree tilt by 1.4 setting the lens 40% farther. Actually, this would ONLY work if you moved camera to have BB in focus.

    Using tilt angle and the new focus point (belly button! :-) it would add 40% to the NOW focus distance.

    So which is it? one or both?

    or is there a third method? (I assume the purpose is nothing more than adjusting for the tilt. Since Phase already have horizon, it seems a similar inclinometer could be used and TF could be done in the Phase/Mamyia set as well.)

    Hard to see how this is an advantage over AF lock.

    Victor

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Victor, maybe I'm not following you but AF lock does not make any focus compensation whereas TF does.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    @Guy - Imagine your H4D on a tripod, ball head. What movement do have on the camera? 360 Rotational - yes? So your scenario you mention would work.

    I said.. As long as it is rotational it doesn't matter what plane it is in. i.e Landscape/Portrait... anything in between!

    @David K - Correct. You will probably find the tilt sensor in the Phase/Mamiya isn't accurate enough, as was the sensor in the H3D.

    Hence a new kind of sensor in the H4D.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    David G,
    Thank you very much for posting the information from Hasselblad. I do think TF is innovative and will work very well for situations within its constraints. I also appreciate Hasseblad's full disclosure here when pointing out such a limitation when the DOF is shallow, " ... A camera movement closer or further away from the camera even as small as 1 cm will change the result and True Focus might not fully correct the focus...", which will most likely occur with telephoto lenses at close range.

    I think this technology will raise the bar in the industry regarding focus accuracy, which benefits everyone. Furthermore, it will force higher accuracy of the base autofocus for each and every lens, since any slight error in the initial autofocus accuracy would then translate into errors for the TF adjustments as well. Actually, it is this need and emphasis of base autofocus accuracy that has my attention more than anything else.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Grover / Hasselblad View Post
    @Guy - Imagine your H4D on a tripod, ball head. What movement do have on the camera? 360 Rotational - yes? So your scenario you mention would work.

    I said.. As long as it is rotational it doesn't matter what plane it is in. i.e Landscape/Portrait... anything in between!

    @David K - Correct. You will probably find the tilt sensor in the Phase/Mamiya isn't accurate enough, as was the sensor in the H3D.

    Hence a new kind of sensor in the H4D.
    Thanks David that helped. Sounds pretty cool
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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Hi David (A lot of Davids!),

    Yes, base focus accuracy is very important. We have been working on this for years, with the sensors, processor, processor speed, mathematics...

    Tiny incremental changes every year. Also in lens design we can do other things to improve AF performance.

    Additionally the H4D has a bright white LED AF assist which really helps in lower light.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    David K, (lots of David's here!)
    I understand AF lock doesnt compensate. I was just saying I couldn't think of the situation where it wasn't what I wanted. Also sounds like you HAVE had the situation. With degrees in both math and physics i can see mechanically what they are doing - what i don't understand is WHY. Sounds like the image setup, aperture, speed, DOF distance etc need to be right on the hairy edge. Can somebody show an example with, without?
    Seems as Guy says pretty cool, so are margaritas; but I drink red wine! :-)

    David G,
    Understand the tilt for horizon may not be accurate enough.

    With this technology, maybe this is just the first step on making some real improvements in basic photography. Ultimately, with a
    reference image and a holographic transform you won't need to focus (except roughly) at all. True! (almost) UCLA is working on I think.

    Victor

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    T
    I also cannot wait to try it with the 100/2.2 which I off-center focus wide open with a lot ... usually really close.
    Marc
    This is exactly how I have been testing the system, ie with the 100 @2.2 focussed at around 0.9m (closest focus sans extn tube). What I found was an improvement handheld that was slightly offset by ME moving inconsistently. On a tripod the effect (of True Focus) was dramatic and repeatable.

    And to re-iterate what D.Grover has said, think of the Tilt/yaw sensor like a Nintendo Wii. In Orlando the product manager for the H4D was hand holding the camera and twisting it this way and that while on screen a 3D model mimicked exactly his movements.
    Nick-T

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    So it can correct in the two dimensions yaw and pitch (tilt)?

    That's pretty impressive. But soundslike real value is wide swings at close focus.. yes?

    Victor

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Yes correct. Multi dimensions! Any combo of tilt and swing.

    And yes again to the second point.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    will this technology be going into a 60 perchance?

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Grover / Hasselblad View Post
    Hi David (A lot of Davids!),

    Yes, base focus accuracy is very important. We have been working on this for years, with the sensors, processor, processor speed, mathematics...

    Tiny incremental changes every year. Also in lens design we can do other things to improve AF performance.

    Additionally the H4D has a bright white LED AF assist which really helps in lower light.
    Can you explain better what Hasselblad does to ensure consistent focus accuracy for each and every lens? For example, Leica's approach is to quality check each individual lens at their factory in Solms. However, even with these careful quality checks, we have often found slight front or back focusing with such brand new lenses. So, maybe Hasselblad has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to ensure the accuracy of all its lenses (as compared to Leica)?

    Also, Rodenstock and Schneider seem to distinguish their digital lenses from their film lenses. Their digital lenses supposedly take into account the IR glass of the sensor. Since the HC lenses can be used with both film and digital, it would seem that the H3D and H4D compensate for this IR glass within the camera body to achieve the same compensation for digital use, is this correct? This is probably a more practical approach than designing separate lens lines.

    Again, I do appreciate all the technical information that you (and Hasselblad in general) provide. It really makes me wonder now how often Alpa shooters achieve optimal plane of focus with their wide angle lenses, if they only rely on scale focusing.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Klepacki View Post
    Since the HC lenses can be used with both film and digital, it would seem that the H3D and H4D compensate for this IR glass within the camera body to achieve the same compensation for digital use, is this correct?
    Yes.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Thanks Nick. That is what I expected.

    In the end, the entire issue of focusing accuracy comes down to the consistent production of lenses with dead on focusing ability that neither are back-focused nor front-focused and in which every lens element is centered. Otherwise, the entire focusing chain is thrown off, as the True Focus mechanism will just propagate any such errors in the lens itself.

    Leica seems to have to go to a lot of trouble to ensure their lens consistency. I am still curious as to how Hasselblad achieves the same thing, and without the same costly effort as Leica.

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by David Klepacki View Post
    Thanks Nick. That is what I expected.

    In the end, the entire issue of focusing accuracy comes down to the consistent production of lenses with dead on focusing ability that neither are back-focused nor front-focused and in which every lens element is centered. Otherwise, the entire focusing chain is thrown off, as the True Focus mechanism will just propagate any such errors in the lens itself.

    Leica seems to have to go to a lot of trouble to ensure their lens consistency. I am still curious as to how Hasselblad achieves the same thing, and without the same costly effort as Leica.
    Hasselblad aside ... I'll let people more expert in tech minutia answer that ... (I'll just assume the long implemented "Micro Adjust" technology works in concert with True Focus until told differently).

    My question is why does it seem that so many Leica lenses are delivered that need to be sent back due to focusing issues? That "costly effort" doesn't appear to correlate directly with actual results. I'll forego the litany of Leica lens experiences ... suffice it to say that the theory of high production costs doesn't necessarily mean anything.

    -Marc

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    Quote Originally Posted by gogopix View Post
    will this technology be going into a 60 perchance?
    As I understand it ... it is H4 technology ... so H4/40, H4/50 and H4/60 will all have it. Please correct me if I'm wrong here ... so I can cancel my order for a H4/60

    -Marc

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    After 8 years with H series blads- I have decided I like the fugly colour of the body-

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    Re: Hassy H4D/40 Release

    So, Peter, is that the chracteristic of the H series that bubbles to the top, in your mind?

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