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Thread: Wooden tripods

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    Wooden tripods

    Slightly OT but I have been contemplating a new tripod and just look at the Berlebach site. There appears to be a plethora of models but not a vast amount of information. I currently use a Gitzo 1325 with Cube.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction please?
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Hi Jeff,

    I'm not sure what you mean by "point you in the right direction", but if you're looking for more information about the various models in an easily accessible format, you could check out the Badger Graphic or B&H Photo websites. They have a description of the features and specifications of each model. There may be other suppliers with similar (or better) ways of presenting the information.

    I have the Berlebach 3032 tripod. It's a 2 section tripod with a leveling ball, but no center column. The Berlebach's are nicely made and not too expensive.

    Gary

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Thanks Gary. What I meant was 'what to look for, what models people are using etc.' It would never occur to me to look at a two leg model comimg from Gitzo three and four leg models.

    I'll loo at Badger and B&H.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods



    Jeff I bought a Reis from a forum member here a couple of years ago..it is much heavier than the Gitzo - here is a snap with my cube an Alpa on top - very sturdy and I get the feeling that vibration damping is a better. You can also keep the base which the Reis comes with so that then he whole base flips and adjust so with Cube you have much extended movement ranges..I like the big knurly knobs - you can switch between metal pins at bottom of legs or rubber feet - depending on usage requirements - the whole kit comes with a padded at end bag - very nice. I preferred it to the one you mentioned above. Everything is replaceable and easy maintenance. Of course adjusting leg extension is more fiddly than with Gitzo. That and weight are the major relative offsets.

    PS shot taken with 180 Xenotar and Sinar Hy6 - love the Rollie lenses for their old school bokeh! -

    Pete
    Last edited by PeterA; 25th June 2010 at 20:30.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Thanks Peter. I'll look at Ries too. Living in Oz like you makes these things more problematic.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I've never seen a Ries in person....but they sure look beautiful in the photos.

    Surely I can find some excuse for owning TWO wooden tripods.

    Gary

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Yes Jeff - the tyranny of distance - makes us internet shopping gurus..also forums like this have lots of people familiar with good stuff available in the USofA

    Apologies about previous spelling errors was in a rush - am half way through a pie baking competition with the "trouble and strife"!

    Gary - I get a buzz out of using beautifully crafted equipment that does a great job -The Reis fits the bill perfectly and makes for a lovely pairing withe the Arca Cube on top! Both lifetime and pass on to whoever ( when the time comes) investments.

  8. #8
    eleanoreran
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I have the Benro C-2691M8 Tripod,This Benro C-2691M8 tripod have an extra function, one of the leg can be used to monopod, it is light and convenient, also give you other choice.you could check out the linkdelight site

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterA View Post
    Gary - I get a buzz out of using beautifully crafted equipment that does a great job -The Reis fits the bill perfectly and makes for a lovely pairing withe the Arca Cube on top! Both lifetime and pass on to whoever ( when the time comes) investments.
    Agreed! Too bad I don't have any children to pass this stuff along to someday. Maybe a niece or nephew.

    Which model of Reis tripod are you using Peter? I was thinking of something along the lines of the J100 or J100-2.

    Gary

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I think it is the J100 - with double tilt head - although the tilt head permanently resides in the leather case which came with the Arca Cube - making the case only nearly useless ! - Meanwhile the Cube uses the RRS cover for their large ball head which resides on my gitzo pod...

    make sure to get the carry case to go with the Reis if you buy.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Thanks folks I now have three brands to look at. BTW, Peter, who won the pie baking competition?
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    BTW, Peter, who won the pie baking competition?


    My edges were a tad overdone - serves me right for inter netting whilst cooking!

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    To an American, "pie" usually means something with fruit ("as American as apple pie"). To Brits and Aussies, I suspect, it means what we'd call a "meat pie." At least that's what Pete's pie looks like. Sometimes the edges get too crispy, but that's better than a soggy center.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Pete's Pie.....looks delicious! What are the ingredients Pete?

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Stephen is quite correct - this is a Meat Pie. Ingredients are: Beef chopped into chunks, and then add whatever you like - mushrooms diced bacon, onion, garlic, pepper salt Worcestershire sauce, stock, and slow cook for a few hours until meat is stringy and you have a thick sauce. The trick is in the pastry...

    Next time I am upping the ante - and am going to make mushy peas and mash to go on top. Mushy peas takes a day to prepare properly. All good winter time eating!

    It is a bright sunny day here today - mid winter in Melbourne - a brisk 8 degrees Centigrade. I am cooking dinner tonight - two roast chickens and Pete's special roasted vegetables..then a family game of poker - ten dollar buy in - big time gamblers. -

  16. #16
    Ken Tanaka
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    Slightly OT but I have been contemplating a new tripod and just look at the Berlebach site. There appears to be a plethora of models but not a vast amount of information. I currently use a Gitzo 1325 with Cube.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction please?
    Hello Jeff,
    Wooden tripods can be wonderful, and actually not appreciably heavier than contemporary tripods with similar load capacities. And, yes, several years ago the Leica mag LFI actually did do scientific testing which concluded that wood legs did dampen vibration better than carbon fiber.

    Frankly, for a dslr and for traveling I stick with more conventional legs. Also, wooden legs exceed the PGR (Pain-Gain Ratio) of 2 for air travel.

    But for larger cameras locally I like to use my Berlebach Report. Leg operation is very easy (easier than even modern twist-locks), center column has ball level, the ash wood is light, very durable, and always warm. It's just a joy to use as long as you don't need a boom.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Thanks Ken. I would be using a Hasselblad H4D so the 9043 looks like it would do the job well. I would keep the Gitzo for travel. What does make me wonder though is why the Berlebach tripods are much cheaper than an equivalent Ries. Is it like comparing Gitzo to Manfrotto?
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Jeff,

    If vibration damping is a very important aspect, then a berlebach without a center column is best. This is true for any tripod with a center column.
    I do not know about the Ries, but there are more tests that show that a berlebach has excellent damping, and appears for that reason quite a favorite for bird-watchers.
    I use a 3032, and love the leveling ball, and as long as i do not have to put my dslr in a portrait position, i mount my camera directly on the leveling ball. Works fine for me.
    For the moment i am not using a quick release system, still looking for one that does not introduce vibration problems.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Thanks Jan, I don't like columns much either. The 3032 is appealing but 56" seems short to me. I am surprised by how short these tripods are. When I get a minute, I will trawl through the site and see if I can find one that is taller.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

  20. #20
    Super Duper
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Here is a link to a thread I started before I bought my Berlebach 4012 without the leveling ball.
    http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/showth...highlight=3032

    I also own a Gitzo which I carry if it has to be light and small - but I really do like the Berlebach so far - I use it mainly for my Artec.
    The head I usee is a geared Manfrotto 410 which works great for me.

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    In case anybody is interested, I have posted a really ugly RIES for sale cheap in the B&S
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    +1 for the Berlebach 3032 model. I use it with my Pentax 67 and Ebony 45SU mounted on a Bogen 3039 Super Pro head. I'm 5'8" and have never needed to extend the tripod to it's full height to have the camera positioned at eye level.

    Gary

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Thanks Gary. I've looked at the 3032. I can't believe how cheap it is compared to a Gitzo CF.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    Thanks Gary. I've looked at the 3032. I can't believe how cheap it is compared to a Gitzo CF.
    Yup, it's a bargain in that regard. It's not comfortable to carry on your shoulder for very far (unless you put a pad of some sort under it). I think someone else mentioned that also.

    Gary

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    Thanks Gary. I've looked at the 3032. I can't believe how cheap it is compared to a Gitzo CF.
    you seem to worry about the prices...
    wood is simply much less expensive than carbon fiber in production.

    the Berlebach tripods are super... don't worry.

    you only have to look for the right model for you... i.e.
    - maximum height extended
    - length unextended
    ...
    - double extension is smaller unextended (but dumping is a bit less, of course)
    - single extension is extremely well dumped but longer when unextended
    - the legs with single extension are bolder; those used for double extension are slimmer (this goes for the "Report" series).
    ...
    - a center column basically adds to vibration (though me personally I've not experienced some as long as the center column is unextended; but I don't use long lenses so maybe that's why I don't have trouble with the center column).

    the damping of a wooden tripod is much better than that of a carbon fiber tripod (that has basically 3 or 4 extensions) - a wood tripod absorbs vibration much faster than a carbon tripod (due to the material itself but also because of less extensions).

    imo

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    My only concern with price is that it often reflects quality. I will never be able to touch one of these until it arrives on my doorstep. It's one of the joys of living in Australia, and also why GetDPI is such a valuable resource. This and the Hasselblad digital site are the two best sites on the web for me.

    I also do long exposures regularly so I need stability over time as well as initial damping. I've had so many pro Berlebach posts on this topic that I feel a purchase coming on.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    My only concern with price is that it often reflects quality.
    rest assured the only downside with wood tripods are weight and packing size/portability (but only with the really large and heavy tripods). Other than that there are only upsides.

    I will never be able to touch one of these until it arrives on my doorstep.
    can't you return it if it's not to your taste? In Germany you can return things within 14 days... especially when you order somthing online.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I suppose that I could return it. I have never tried it having always done a lot of research beforehand. The freight cost would be quite expensive. I was surprised by how reasonable the freight cost to Australia is. They obviously ship a lot of stuff around the world.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I have two Berlebach tripods, both with leveling bases, no center column. The small one goes right to the ground with its legs splayed and is great for close-up field or table-top work. The other is a 3032. I use a Novoflex Q=base quick-release adapter, which holds and locks an L-bracket on a dslr or -- even better -- locks directly to the base of any AFI or HY6.

    This is the most stable, vibration-free arrangement that I have found. WIth a dslr on an L-bracket, it's very quick to rotate from landscape to portrait. With the AFI II it's not necessary because the sensor rotates internally. In either case, the several degrees of leveling freedom are enough to handle most cases. In fact, with an Acratech level quick release plate, leveling is very quick and easy.

    As others have noted, the only drawbacks of the Berlebach 3032 are its weight (7 #) and the discomfort of sharp edges cutting into your shoulder on cross-country.

    Dave.


    Berlebach 2-Section Mini Tripod With Leveling Ball: <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/655100-REG/Berlebach_BE50032_2_Section_Mini_Tripod_With.html>

    Berlebach 3032 Wood Tripod Legs with Levelling Ball: <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/302815-REG/Berlebach_BE3032_3032_Wood_Tripod_Legs.html>

    Q=base: <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/269761-REG/Novoflex_Q_BASE_Q_Base_Automatic_Quick_Release.htm l>

    Acratech level quick release plate: <http://acratech.net/product.php?productid=15&cat=0&page=1>:

  30. #30
    Super Duper
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    The quality of my Berlebach is very good.
    By the way last summer there was a Leica demonstration/testing of Binocular and Scopes and the Leica guy was very happy with his wooden tripod. He said that each other material a movement/shake would need much longer to go away than with the wooden legs when looking through a scope.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Peter:

    what model Reis is that?

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I will order a 3032 and 113 monopod. The 3032 will wear my Arca B1, and I will get another Custom Bracket setup for the monopod. Thank you one and all for your input.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Workshop Member ptomsu's Avatar
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Just ordered my 3032 directly from Berlebach!

    Should arrive in a few days.

    Peter

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    Peter:

    what model Reis is that?
    Hi Jim - David K will know for sure - since I bought it from him- but it is either the A100-2 or the J100-2 - came with 2 way tilt pan head and case to match.

    The company's site is pretty ordinary - the tripods are - extraordinary. Looking at the German make and judging by the machining of the head and quality of the fasteners..- I don't think they are anywhere near the quality of the Reis.

    Pete

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    your reis is beautiful, I especially like the linkages under the head that lock the legs. It is not clear from the Reis site if all the models have that feature. I noticed the "ugly" jack version, an older C series did not. i will contact Reis directly...


    just found out:

    A100 has a 6" crown plate, J-100 has a 4-1/4 plate; the -2 models use 1/4" thicker wood for the legs, all A and J models have the linkages.

    the C model has a 4" plate and no linkages
    Last edited by jlm; 1st July 2010 at 07:25.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I agree that the Reis tripods appear to be a step up from the Berlebach....but of course, the price reflects that too. I especially like the ability to lock the legs in position with the A and J versions. The J100-2 really appeals to me.....it's on my wish list now.

    Gary

  37. #37
    Alan Fairhurst
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    While there can be no doubt that wood provides better damping than almost any other material, there is also the problem of construction. Fixing a camera to the tripod head at its balance point is guaranteed to assist vibration. I have a pentapod for cameras sensitive to vibration. Basically a second tripod with one leg removed and the remaining legs fastened to two of the legs of the main tripod. In use the camera is fastened to the main head and the front of the lens to the second head, it is fiddly in use but there is absolutely zero vibration.

    Alan.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    For what it's worth, quite a few years ago I did some very quick and unscientific testing of vibration reduction from different tripod materials and designs. I took a small telescope, mounted a T-mount camera to it, and observed the visible shake in the viewfinder immediately after the shutter/mirror fired. (Yes, it would have been better to actually shoot a bunch of pictures through the camera, but this was back in the days of film and I wanted instant gratification.) I found that aluminum, even huge and heavy aluminum, didn't dampen vibrations effectively at all. Both wood and carbon fibre worked very well, and I didn't see a significant advantage to wood over CF, so ended up selling my Ries in favor of a CF Gitzo at less than half the weight. I still much prefer the look and feel of wood tripods, but if you have to carry the things, carbon's a safe bet.

    Jeremy

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Interesting Jim - thanks for that - mine is the J-100 then. Yes the linkages and quality of construction makes it a joy to use and a very pretty thing - often sitting in my gallery at my offices with something or other attached on top - it is a piece of retro art - i think of it as a sculpture - people love touching it and going oooo ahhh when they see an old school camera attached on top..

    much more interesting than the typical art by the meter type stuff!

    -

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I thought long and hard about Ries vs Berlebach. In the past, I would have just bought the Ries without much contemplation but a few things lately have made me reconsider. The most recent was buying my Custom Bracket for the Neotec monopod. There is an RRS equivalent of it at more than twice the price from memory but my conclusion was that the RRS was over-engineered and a less elegant solution for my needs. I will buy another Custom Bracket for my new monopod.

    I suspect that the Ries falls into the same camp. It is indisputably superior in engineering and componentry but I doubt it will do a better job in the field.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    I suspect that the Ries falls into the same camp. It is indisputably superior in engineering and componentry but I doubt it will do a better job in the field.
    probably true. The design of the Berlebachs is very basic and simple. But that doesn't affect the performance.
    Too, the leg locking mechanism with screws of the Ries adds to the weight. The Berlebachs use a simple rotating wheel so that you can lock the legs at regular angle, a wider angle (to bring the camera to a lower position) or to unlock the legs completely if desired.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    I agree that the differences in use are unlikely to justify the cost - so i wouldn't sweat it - to be honest a heavier legged Gitzo with no center column is my main workhorse in the field - on a beach - somehow wooden legs don't have much appeal for me.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Agreed Peter, the Gitzo 1325 with the Cube on the top plate will be going to the beach. The only water the Berlebach will see is snow and some rain.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
    www.jeff-grant.com

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Look forward to hearing what you think of the wooden tripod Jeff, yeah wouldn't last long on the beach I think, but there would probably be a nice feeling using a wooden tripod.
    www.williamophuis.com

    Hassy H4D-40.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    just got my Reis, what a beautiful object!
    looks just like that in post #4, but bronze knobs and warmer wood

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    Nice John - which one did you get? I have been eying them for about a year now but I don't want to carry the extra weight when I am walking around the city shooting.

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    Re: Wooden tripods

    J-100

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