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Thread: Leveling Bases

  1. #1
    Ben Norton
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    Leveling Bases

    I think everyone knows of the Arca and the Clam but how do people rate the Nodal Ninja and Manfrotto options?
    Obviously they don't have the scope for correction as the big daddies but does anyone prefer one to the other? Ltd budget means no big toys for me right now...

  2. #2
    Senior Member yaya's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    What about this one?

  3. #3
    Ben Norton
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Nice mate but it's about 5 times the price of the NN and Manfrotto's. I've got a panning head already so it's really just a base that i'm thinking about getting.

    Unless of course you've got an Arca Cube stashed away in your treasure trove you fancy hooking me up with cheaply?

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    I have all the three...

    Manfrotto: heavy, bulky, the screws are extremely tight (but you can loosen them a little bit). Limited leveling degree... i.e. leveling within 5° or so.
    Super rock solid.
    Great for studio work, simply too heavy to carry around.

    Nodal Ninja: lightweight, very nice and smooth operation. Quite large leveling degree.
    Actually a perfect leveling base... BUT: you have to tighten the counter screws otherwise the base can have play... i.e. camera shake will be introduced easily.
    With the counter screws tightened it's solid (for a MF camera with DB and a medium sized lens).
    I use it in conjunction with a Novoflex pano base as tripod head for my Contax when shooting subjetcs that ask for perfect leveling but were I don't have to tilt the camera very much.

    Cambo: entirely different league. Super smooth, relatively lightweight, no counter screws, very accurate, quite large leveling degree.
    Absolutely worth the price!
    It's constantly mounted on my Cambo WRS camera, however I also have the additional mounting and rail to mount the Contax on it (requires to remove it from the Cambo... this is why I mostly use the Nodal Ninja for the Contax).

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    If you have a Gizto tripod, this works great and is reasonably priced. Gitzo Leveling Base

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    Senior Member routlaw's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Here is yet another though it is not very well known. Have heard great things about it however.

    http://www.thelevelhead.com/

    Hope this helps

    Rob

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gowin View Post
    If you have a Gizto tripod, this works great and is reasonably priced. Gitzo Leveling Base
    but leveling is not geared. It's a pain to level a camera accurately with those ballheads...

    Quote Originally Posted by routlaw View Post
    Here is yet another though it is not very well known. Have heard great things about it however.

    http://www.thelevelhead.com/

    Hope this helps

    Rob
    looks very good!! thanks for the link!

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    but leveling is not geared. It's a pain to level a camera accurately with those ballheads...
    I can't see how it could possibly be easier and faster to level a camera plate than it is with the Gitzo leveling base. The leveling base post is long enough to give you good leverage so all it takes is a twist of the post to loosen, adjust level by moving the post (bubble level on base), then twist post to lock. All it takes is one hand and it is very quick, simple, and easy.

    The levelhead posted below does look very good.

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gowin View Post
    I can't see how it could possibly be easier and faster to level a camera plate than it is with the Gitzo leveling base. The leveling base post is long enough to give you good leverage so all it takes is a twist of the post to loosen, adjust level by moving the post (bubble level on base), then twist post to lock. All it takes is one hand and it is very quick, simple, and easy.
    I don't talk about "somewhat leveled". I talk about very accurate leveling. Now, with the camera and lens mounted on a ballhead this is nowhere near the handling of a geared leveling. A very good ballhead with friction control is okay for leveling, but without friction it's nearly impossible to work really precise.
    Once you've used geared leveling with one of the above mentioned leveling bases or the Cube you will see the difference.

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    What about this? The manfrotto as always looks as a good compromise at less than $100.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&s...=&oq=&gs_rfai=

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    I don't talk about "somewhat leveled". I talk about very accurate leveling. Now, with the camera and lens mounted on a ballhead this is nowhere near the handling of a geared leveling. A very good ballhead with friction control is okay for leveling, but without friction it's nearly impossible to work really precise.
    Once you've used geared leveling with one of the above mentioned leveling bases or the Cube you will see the difference.
    I'm listening Thomas so please explain how geared leveling is more accurate. Does it have more accurate or higher resolution level indication (e.g,. bubble level)? After all, the limiting factor in achieving level is in the resolution/accuracy of the level indicator - not the mechanism which tilts the base.

    Sure, geared leveling forces small incremental changes in level which will give the impression of precision. However, the rate of change in achieving level does not guarantee more accurate level in the end. Level accuracy is dictated by the accuracy of the level indicator. In fact ,I recall reading a post a while back where a user reported the level indicator on his Cube was incorrect.

    There real question is just how accurate does level need to be for a photograph, especially in today's world of the digital darkroom.

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Uaiomex View Post
    What about this? The manfrotto as always looks as a good compromise at less than $100.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&s...=&oq=&gs_rfai=
    i bought the manfrotto a while ago: adjusting is a pain unless you take a pair of pliers with you. when the cube was available for a special price i bought it. it's an awful lot of money (and i'm still a bit disappointed that one of the levels isn't exactly level) but i can't imagine going back to a different head.

    chris

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Another opinion... I've owned the Gitzo, Sinar and Manfrotto and used the Nova. Of all, I preferred the Nova for accuracy and the Gitzo for speed, but all did the job. Bottom line however, since I got my Cube, I simply have had no need for a leveling head, so sold them off after about two months of non-use.

    FWIW,
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    To have a Cube would be pure bliss I'm sure (being serious here). I looked into the Cube back when everyone here was getting one. The design looks like the best compromise of speed and precision. One of these days I may get one, but for now I have other priorities for my money since I don't use a tripod very often anyway.

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    Administrator Bob's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    My cube is pretty accurate and although it might be a touch off, it matters little to me since it is far far better than any alternative I have come across.
    I even use it in-studio with model shoots which I guess says more about me than the cube, but it is fast enough to tilt up to grab a fresh focus then back to the framing I want.
    I just do not see the point of using a gitzo style leveling base (which I have owned) and then topping it with a ball head.
    I didn't like the ghastly manfrotto geared head since I could see it jiggle as it recoiled from a mirror slap.
    -bob

  16. #16
    Super Duper
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    I used to use a combination of a ballhead and leveling base till I got the Cube. Using a ballhead is good in certain circumstances where speed of movement is needed however they have (in my opinion) a major drawback. The drawback is a lack of precision which is based on the knob/pressure holding the ball. Geared movements (again in my opinion) offer better control of movements which add to the precision. If I had to do it all over again I'd also look at the Cambo head which wasn't available when I got the Cube; then again this is based solely on what and how I shoot.

    Just a couple more thoughts re the Cube. I don't depend on the Cube to set me level, rather I use the levels which are built-in to the Cambo WRS to show me when I'm level. I'm beginning to use the M9 on the Cube and there I use the leveling of the Cube to insure I'm level. While we can certainly use software to achieve level you need to be as close as possible first as the software can at times drastically crop the image to a degree when while you have a level image it's not what you were after. Time spent setting up the image will pay huge dividends when you process.

    Once again just my 2¢
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gowin View Post
    I'm listening Thomas so please explain how geared leveling is more accurate. Does it have more accurate or higher resolution level indication (e.g,. bubble level)? After all, the limiting factor in achieving level is in the resolution/accuracy of the level indicator - not the mechanism which tilts the base.

    Sure, geared leveling forces small incremental changes in level which will give the impression of precision. However, the rate of change in achieving level does not guarantee more accurate level in the end. Level accuracy is dictated by the accuracy of the level indicator. In fact ,I recall reading a post a while back where a user reported the level indicator on his Cube was incorrect.

    There real question is just how accurate does level need to be for a photograph, especially in today's world of the digital darkroom.
    Mark, that sounds a bit like grey theory.

    true. the main limiting factor is the level indicator. if the level indicator is off it's all a waste of time and effort.

    however the mechanism that tilts the base also plays a role in terms of practical usability.
    The heavier the gear on the head and the more its centre of gravity is off the center axis of the tripod the more the thing will wobble back and forth. Mostly this leads to too large movements when you try to level on a ballhead (this is why friction control and geared movements were invented after all). Whereas geared leveling will allow very, very fine adjustments - i.e. small movements. You will see the difference immediately if you try to algin the grid of the groundglass/finder screen with a straight rectangular motif.

    As to straightening/rotation in software: every interpolation degrades IQ. Matter of personal choice whether the trade off is okay or not. As far as I am concerned I try to keep the number of interpolation steps in software as low as possible (ideally I only use distortion correction).

  18. #18
    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    I typically find that the leveling bases with center spot levels are inaccurate anyways as parallax affects how accurately you can adjust & see the level unless you view from directly above. Ditto the levels always seem to slightly off, even with the cube.

    I find it best to eyeball level in camera and make sure that I don't frame too tight so that straightening afterwards is possible without losing too much in a crop. I'll use the levels to get it approximately right but then go manual from there.

    I've yet to find a truely accurate level on a base, head, hot shoe, in-camera or even the sensor/viewfinder alignment combo.

  19. #19
    Bob Davis
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post

    I find it best to eyeball level in camera and make sure that I don't frame too tight so that straightening afterwards is possible without losing too much in a crop. I'll use the levels to get it approximately right but then go manual from there.
    Graham,

    I agree for many single image shots you can just eyeball it. For multi-shot panos, level is critical. Whenever I've tried to eyeball level on a pano, I'd often loose 20%, maybe 25% on the horizontal stitch. With a good leveling base you would only loose a few pixels on the top and bottom after stitching.

    Bob

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    I typically find that the leveling bases with center spot levels are inaccurate anyways as parallax affects how accurately you can adjust & see the level unless you view from directly above. Ditto the levels always seem to slightly off, even with the cube.
    unfortunately this is very true.
    The popular bull's eye spirit levels are mostly not really accurate… in my experience. I have bull's eye levels in an Induro tripod, a Berlebach tripod, the Manfrotto leveling base and in a Novoflex pano base. They are all off.
    Besides, I absolutely agree that you have to view them from straight above. So usabilty is extremely limited (actually you always have to unmount the camera to view the levels… and if the camera is mounted high, above head level, you can't see them at all).

    I use a Gitzo GH3780QR ballhead that is equipped with 3 (actually 4) tubular spirit levels. You can always view them when the camera is mounted… even when it is mounted above head level. The nice thing is: you can adjust the levels. I've "synchronized" the levels of the Gitzo head with my Cambo WRS levels (which are accurate). So that works really well.
    I'd love to have quick release plates/bases with tubular levels (adjustable levels would be a dream).

    However all the levels (either way tubular or bull's eye) suck in oxygen (at least a photo engineer once told me so). So they have to be adjusted (or replaced) after some time anyway.

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    Senior Member stephengilbert's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Acratech makes a good, i.e., accurate, level (based on a small sample size ). It's a bit of extra work, but is accurate: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ase_Plate.html

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by stephengilbert View Post
    Acratech makes a good, i.e., accurate, level (based on a small sample size ). It's a bit of extra work, but is accurate: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ase_Plate.html
    thanks for the link... ordered

    Two more leveling bases:
    http://manfrotto.de/product/8374.484..._Nivellierkopf

    http://www.berlebach.de/?bereich=det...prache=english

    I also came across this (new?) ballhead which is a 3-way head.
    Looks somehow like "Burzynski meets the Cube" (well, "baby-Cube")...:
    http://www.berlebach.de/?bereich=details&id=383

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by stephengilbert View Post
    Acratech makes a good, i.e., accurate, level (based on a small sample size ). It's a bit of extra work, but is accurate: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ase_Plate.html
    Great product, but unfortunately it does not help the issue of plates and L-brackets not being perfectly parallel and/or perpendicular with the camera they're mounted to.
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    Great product, but unfortunately it does not help the issue of plates and L-brackets not being perfectly parallel and/or perpendicular with the camera they're mounted to.
    did not yet see such issues with my kit. I don't have an L bracket, though.

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by stephengilbert View Post
    Acratech makes a good, i.e., accurate, level (based on a small sample size ). It's a bit of extra work, but is accurate: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ase_Plate.html
    very usefull little accessory! Thanks again for the tip.

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    Workshop Member Wayne Fox's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gowin View Post
    I'm listening Thomas so please explain how geared leveling is more accurate. Does it have more accurate or higher resolution level indication (e.g,. bubble level)? After all, the limiting factor in achieving level is in the resolution/accuracy of the level indicator - not the mechanism which tilts the base.
    I would agree with this. Most tripod heads that use a single bubble for all planes are rarely accurate enough so I either have one in the flash bracket or use the ones in my Alpa Max Body). The cube also has independent bubble levels for each direction so it's more accurate than most heads, but I've found my cube levels seem to be off just a tad.

    Lately i've been using the virtual horizon function of my phaseone back, or an app on my iPhone both which seem very precise and pretty easy to use when I want the base more critically level. Geared head (I have a cube) makes it very accurate and easy. As Jack mentioned, with the cube a leveling base is sort of redundant ... really don't need it.

    Of course, you can always use another cube as the leveling base ...

    http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12056

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Wayne, what is the iPhone app?
    Cheers,
    Jeff
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Jeff,

    There are various level apps, but they share the same problem: the physical shape of the phone. My iPhone 3G has a rounded back. For the level to be more than a toy, you'd need a flat back on the phone and a flat surface to put it on.

    Steve

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    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Fox View Post
    I would agree with this. Most tripod heads that use a single bubble for all planes are rarely accurate enough so I either have one in the flash bracket or use the ones in my Alpa Max Body). The cube also has independent bubble levels for each direction so it's more accurate than most heads, but I've found my cube levels seem to be off just a tad.

    Lately i've been using the virtual horizon function of my phaseone back, or an app on my iPhone both which seem very precise and pretty easy to use when I want the base more critically level. Geared head (I have a cube) makes it very accurate and easy. As Jack mentioned, with the cube a leveling base is sort of redundant ... really don't need it.

    Of course, you can always use another cube as the leveling base ...

    http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12056
    For the non cube kind of guy I use the virtual horizon function quite often. Works really well but would be nice if at some point a firmware update that would allow maybe a 3 second press of one of the 4 buttons and it automatically came up. Did anyone at Phase hear that request.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Does the virtual horizon function switch planes as you move the back from horizontal to vertical?
    Don Libby
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    Workshop Member Wayne Fox's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffg53 View Post
    Wayne, what is the iPhone app?
    Quote Originally Posted by stephengilbert View Post
    Jeff,

    There are various level apps, but they share the same problem: the physical shape of the phone. My iPhone 3G has a rounded back. For the level to be more than a toy, you'd need a flat back on the phone and a flat surface to put it on.

    Steve
    I use iHandy Level. Has both a traditional bubble level and a surface level.

    The case I had my iPhone 3gs resolved that issue. However, I now have the an iPhone 4 (no antenna issues for me at all), and the new iPhone design is very easy to use as a level. One side is very flat, and the back is very flat now.
    Last edited by Wayne Fox; 6th August 2010 at 15:33. Reason: typo

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Does the virtual horizon function switch planes as you move the back from horizontal to vertical?
    Yes it does, Don.

    I guess you'll be needing that P65+ afterall!

    CI Operators are standing by....


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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    For the non cube kind of guy I use the virtual horizon function quite often. Works really well but would be nice if at some point a firmware update that would allow maybe a 3 second press of one of the 4 buttons and it automatically came up. Did anyone at Phase hear that request.
    oh ... I hope someone at Phase is listing (Kevin?)

    A great feature which is much to hard to get to considering I use it on nearly every setup. I would rather have it in place of the ISO button.


    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Does the virtual horizon function switch planes as you move the back from horizontal to vertical?
    Yes.

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Fox View Post
    I use iHandy Level. Has both a traditional bubble level and a surface level.

    The case I had my iPhone 3gs resolved that issue. However, I now have the an iPhone 4 (no antenna issues for me at all), and the new iPhone design is very easy to use as a level. One side is very flat, and the back is very flat now.
    Thanks Wayne. I'll try anything. I just wish Hasselblad had the virtual horizon feature.
    Cheers,
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    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    One thing that I'd like to see as a future option for the in-camera levels would be a user calibration option. I know that the in-camera level on my Nikons is not quite correct compared to the sensor/VF etc but only slightly off. I'd be prepared to go through the process of shooting & comparing "level" images to determine the slight correction needed for accuracy. We have the lens fine tuning, why not the level fine tuning too?

    I'm sure that the same facility would be useful for backs too, especially given the mechanical nature of the camera/back fittings.

  36. #36
    Shelby Lewis
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    I wonder if using something like this, stuck on a cube (it's magnetic) would offer more accuracy. You'd have to level and then rotate it 90 degrees and check again, but it does offer quite a bit of resolution.

    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...84&cat=1,43513

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Thanks Shelby. I just ordered one.
    Cheers,
    Jeff
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  38. #38
    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Looks like a good accurate level and worth getting for that alone.

    Of course the magnetic attraction of it won't help with the cube. If you're not sure why I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader

  39. #39
    Shelby Lewis
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    Looks like a good accurate level and worth getting for that alone.

    Of course the magnetic attraction of it won't help with the cube. If you're not sure why I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader
    ... ah... didn't think of that!!!

  40. #40
    Senior Member stephengilbert's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    And it wouldn't work on the 40 pound stainless steel Cube either.

  41. #41
    Shelby Lewis
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    It'll still work though... you just have to "check level"as opposed to it being attached all the time.

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    Question Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    I don't talk about "somewhat leveled". I talk about very accurate leveling.
    Could you perhaps define "very accurate" in this context?

    My Starrett 199Z levels are accurate to ten arc seconds (1/360th of a degree = 0.0005" per foot) per division.

    The level head looks nice, but insanely expensive. It's just a dual sine plate, a design that's been around for well over 100 years.

    Has anyone come up with an actual number defining the required accuracy? I didn't see that value listed in the specs for any of the referenced products.

    Thanks.

    - Leigh

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    Exclamation Re: Leveling Bases and tripod

    If you're shooting panos, leveling the camera is not sufficient. You must also level the tripod such that the axis of rotation of the camera is absolutely vertical.

    I've never used the Arca Cube, but looking at the design its operation would appear to be a two-step process. I expect the same to be true for similar products.

    First you must set both axes to zero degrees. Then you level the tripod using the levels on the cube.

    After that you can set whatever angles you wish, or rotate the camera.

    - Leigh

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
    Could you perhaps define "very accurate" in this context?
    originally I was referring to geared leveling vs. non geared leveling. Geard leveling allows very small adjustments of movements... consequently allows accurate leveling (basically).
    I'd consider a "very accurate" result when I don't have to straighten the image in post (or otherwise have to correct perspective) ... assumed that I did not screw up the shot.

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Leveling Bases and tripod

    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
    If you're shooting panos, leveling the camera is not sufficient. You must also level the tripod such that the axis of rotation of the camera is absolutely vertical.

    I've never used the Arca Cube, but looking at the design its operation would appear to be a two-step process. I expect the same to be true for similar products.

    >> First you must set both axes to zero degrees. Then you level the tripod using the levels on the cube.
    Nope!

    On the Cube, the top platform pans independently (as does the base.) So, regardless of how level your tripod is, you first lock the base pan, dial pitch to level, then dial roll to level, and the top platform is now level; you can now pan your stitches on that plane with confidence. This, combined with the micro-adjustability of the geared axis are IMO the big advantages to the Cube.

    Moreover, IF you want to do a multi-row spherical stitch, the Cube's pitch and roll axis are located well above the top plate, almost at lens axis. Hence it is close enough to "nodal" that current software can accommodate for say a three-row spherical capture.
    Jack
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    I feel there's two parts to a capturing good panos starting with proper level and ending with the lens nodal point.

    I never bothered with leveling the tripod but made dead certain the camera was as level as I could get it before worrying about the nodal point. One of the easiest ways I found in checking the camera level was a simple level cube on top and moving the camera left to right making certain the bubble remained centered; if it moved at all it meant the camera wasn't leveled. The nodal point was always a PIA and I never could get it perfect no matter how I tried. This was when I was shooing my landscapes with 35mm and then with the Mamiya AFD/P30+ using a combination of ballheads, leveling bases, and RRS "Ultimate-Pro Omni-Pivot Package" which I found to get very good. All that changed when I got the Cube.

    The Cube allows one to achieve a level camera while providing a stable panning head with the ability to take precise multiple row, multiple column images much the same way the RRS UPOPP does. I know as that was one of the first things I tried shortly after getting the Cube. So you have a choice, use a good ballhead, leveling device and RRS gear or use one head that offers all the above.

    Just a side note here (speaking from experience) - but no matter how you do it; how much you attempt to setup the perfect combination of level and nodal point for a multi-row spherical stitch, you'll never achieve the same final output as that found in flat stitching found in a technical camera. It'll be close yet the act of the camera and lens moving versus just the camera will always give a certain amount of distortion to the image.

    As always just my 2¢

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    Thumbs up Re: Leveling Bases and tripod

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    On the Cube, the top platform pans independently (as does the base.)
    Hi Jack,

    OK. I thought that might be the case.

    That's why I said "the axis of rotation of the camera must be absolutely vertical".

    The statement is correct even if you introduce additional axes of rotation in the system.

    I had not considered rotation about a horizontal axis, but I can see where that might be useful.

    If you really want to be precise, all rotational axes must pass through the rear nodal point of the lens.

    Thanks for the clarification.

    - Leigh
    Last edited by Leigh; 15th August 2010 at 09:38.

  48. #48
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    Re: Leveling Bases

    I went for the Fanotec EZ Leveller II in the end. Decided that i really didn't need all the bells and whistles of a clam/cube right now. For the price, i have to say it's a very nice little piece of kit. It's lightened up my tripod by over a kilo!
    If anyone is interested, the cheapest i could find in the UK was at 360 Tactical VR in East Kilbride. Awesome dudes. Shipped my head direct from Italy to me as they were out of stock and saved me a few days of waiting which was very good of them.

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    "Virtual Horizon" calibration on IQ back?

    The "Virtual Horizon" on my IQ160 is a very cool tool, especially in "numeric Roll and Pitch Values" mode where you can almost breathe on it to affect the numbers. Just one problem... it's way off! The bubble levels on my Cube and camera are synced, and correlate with a separate laser level, but the "Virtual Horizon" isn't even close. Is there a way to calibrate it?

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    Re: Leveling Bases

    There's no documented way of calibrating the IQ level. Maybe Phase One or their dealers perhaps have a hidden option to set this kind of stuff. I'd also like to be able to do this too because all of the levels on my gear all seem to be different - that's on the tripod, the Cube, my Alpa STC and the IQ160.

    I've come around to the conclusion that it's ok to be 'close enough' and always also leave a little bit of breathing room in images anyway because being 100% technically level isn't always aesthetically the most pleasing presentation due to the way your mind interpretes an image. (For example a level image with a large mass on one side or the other may appear to be leaning one way or the other even though it truly is "level"). It also helps if you ever do any keystoning corrections too.
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