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Thread: ALPA TC

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    ALPA TC

    To someone who has never used MF, this forum has been a wonderful source of inspiration and information. Thank you!

    It is likely that this year I will make the switch to MF and have identified the Alpa TC as my preferred choice. I was first attracted to the Alpa when I saw a report from Guy Mancuso. Either he has huge hands or the Alpa TC is truly a perfectly sized travel camera

    To say that I'm somewhat nervous about the prospect of a change is an understatement and I would therefore hugely appreciate some further advice.

    My travels take me to interesting but primitive places. The nature of the work I'm involved in and need to document puts considerable stress on my camera gear which must tolerate dust, sometimes rain, dirt and rough travel conditions.

    As background, I have used the Leica M8 but had reliability issues and therefore felt compelled to switch to the excellent Nikon D3S which ticks most boxes apart from size, weight and I'm also increasingly wishing for more resolution.

    Having therefore identified the Alpa TC I have two main questions for those who have used this camera:

    1. How robust and tolerant of rough travel is it?
    2. I have yet to identify a suitable digital back. Daylight viewing clarity and robustness need to play a big part. I'm looking at something in the 20-30 MP range.

    Many thanks

    Dubois

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    Re: ALPA TC

    The TC body is a metal plate with grips onto which you attach Copal shutter equipped lenses and a digital or film back. Not much to screw up there. The lenses themselves are a bit more delicate than the body (they are made of glass and have moving parts) and the Copal shutters are mechanically cocked. Where you have to really worry is the digital back. Not one, to my knowledge, is weather sealed. The only MF systems that are, are the Leica S2 and Pentax 645D which are monolithic camera designs (integrated body & sensor).

    Above all, technical cameras like the TC require a methodical approach to photography. This not a snap shot camera. The lenses are not coupled to the viewfinder, so focus has to be A) guessed at; B) dialed in (Alpa just released some high precision focus rings for their lenses) from a laser rangefinder or C) removing the digital back and using a ground glass insert. The new IQ backs from Phase One have a Semi Live View that will allow for precision focusing without removing the back.

    Hope this helps...
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    Re: ALPA TC

    Looks as if you need one of the new Phase One IQ backs, presumably the 140. It has 40 megapixels and is probably the most weathersealed of all digital backs. If you really want to be on the sure side, I recommend a Leica S2, which is fully weather sealed. The TC is just a metal frame basically, so I guess one could say it is very robust just by virtue of its simplicity. From what you describe, I wouldn't take any digital back on such a trip, this kind of equipment needs special care and protection ...

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    Re: ALPA TC

    "The nature of the work I'm involved in and need to document puts considerable stress on my camera gear which must tolerate dust, sometimes rain, dirt and rough travel conditions."

    Except the Pentax 645 and the Leica S2 no medium format system ist fully weather sealed. Do you really want expose a digital back worth 20k to rain, dirt and rough travel? Your description at least to me sounds like the prime example, when to NOT take a mfdb with you ... If those two systems are too expensive, take the Nikon D3x which has almost mfdb quality and is a joy to photograph with ...
    Last edited by Paul Spinnler; 11th March 2011 at 22:57.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    I would tend to agree with the thought that if you need bullet proof digital then I'd stick with the D3s or D3x.

    I shoot with the Alpa STC & Phase One P40+ (plus I'm a Nikon shooter & reluctant 645DF shooter), and I wouldn't worry so much about the back so much as the delicate nature of the lens / copal shutter in extreme conditions. I've found for example that the Copal shutter and helicoid can be sensitive to dust and after two dusty trips I've already seen dust ingested into one of my Alpa lenses. Now thats not a real problem per se but it indicative of sensitivity to weather and if this had been moisture then things might be different.

    The back isn't really a worry although it's not advertised as being weather sealed but in practice it seems pretty darned resistant to the elements. The sensor itself really is just something that you'll look after and the worst case generally in inclement weather is the chance of either dust on it or potentially condensation on the outer glass in damp conditions. I've seen this happen with my outfit in cold damp situations such as when changing a lens near a waterfall or when exiting an air-con vehicle (same is true for DSLR btw!). The Alpa body is aluminum alloy and so can get & stay cold under these conditions. The main thing I worry about with the P40+ is the battery assembly on the side - I make sure that I keep this as dry as possible and avoid any moisture getting in on that side. The CF door and sync adapters seem pretty decent, especially now that Phase provide a rubber cover for the connectors although I confess that I have to remove this to use the sync cable regularly on the Alpa.

    As regards mechanical resistance to the elements with the Alpa, I've been saturated in mist and in the rain with mine and so long as you're not changing lenses or removing the back the tight fit of the lens assembly & back adapter have not let water get in between the rear element of the lens and the sensor glass - so far at least.

    When I venture out into the really nasty stuff I typically reach for my Nikons. Both the D3s & D3x and pro glass with a$$ gaskets on them keep everything running flawlessly in even pretty much a drenching.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Spinnler View Post
    ... take the Nikon D3x which has almost mfdb quality and is a joy to photograph with ...
    +1 with the D3X (or Canon equivalent). And a big plus is that you will be able to afford backup gear (e.g. extra body/lenses) if you are truly going to expose your gear to such demanding conditions.

    Edit: P.S. My Nikons over the years have been dropped, knocked, exposed to rain/dirt/mud/sand etc. and have proven reliable. I expect that the high-end Canons would be the same.
    Last edited by cng; 11th March 2011 at 23:18.

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    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by rdubois View Post
    It is likely that this year I will make the switch to MF and have identified the Alpa TC as my preferred choice. I was first attracted to the Alpa when I saw a report from Guy Mancuso. Either he has huge hands or the Alpa TC is truly a perfectly sized travel camera
    Btw, no Guy doesn't have huge hands (not that i noticed at least) and yes, the TC can be tiny with a wide angle lens & digital back on it. These aspects of the Alpa are certainly attractive if raw image quality is what you are after in a small package. At its simplest you can have either a single lens or couple of lenses with the rest of the outfit in a very small & portable outfit.

    Check out the video over at optechsdigital.com site for an example of the portability: http://optechsdigital.com/Videos.html
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Thank you Graham and others.

    I've seen the digitaloptech video which was also instrumental in my leaning towards the Alpa.

    I also fully endorse the comments about the Nikon D3S. In the 14 months that I've used the Nikon it has performed flawlessly. Everything is good about it: robustness, weather sealing, battery life.... except for the size and weight. Even with prime lenses it's a big and weighty package and therefore from this point of view I wouldn't consider the Leica S2 or the Pentax.

    I hadn't realised that there was no weather sealed digital back so it may be a problem although I'm encouraged by Graham's experiences. In transit I normally protect my gear in a pelicase which works well but again size and weight of the Nikon and a few lenses means a big case and this is where I figured the Alpa would be a big advantage.

    Thanks again for all your comments.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Dubois, if your D3S is too large then i would have suggested the D700, which is also ruggedly built but smaller. However, it has "only" 12MP like your D3S and you want more resolution. I guess the D7000's 16MP doesn't entice you either?

    Unfortunately, as we all know, compromises abound when selecting gear. Seeing as this is the MF forum and you sound as if you are really keen on an Alpa (who could blame you? ), then please let us know your final choice and how you find working with it.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    I leave the pelicase at home and travel with a Samsonite cosmetic case that is small, strong, sealed, has a built in lock and cost about 10 bucks if you find one at a garage sale. It also doesn't look like a camera case and fits easily in a backpack - but you have to get used to the wisecracks if you travel with gear afficiandos.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    Btw, no Guy doesn't have huge hands (not that i noticed at least) and yes, the TC can be tiny with a wide angle lens & digital back on it. These aspects of the Alpa are certainly attractive if raw image quality is what you are after in a small package. At its simplest you can have either a single lens or couple of lenses with the rest of the outfit in a very small & portable outfit.

    Check out the video over at optechsdigital.com site for an example of the portability: http://optechsdigital.com/Videos.html
    No I do not have very big hands. Actually they are short and plump just like me. LOL

    The TC is the smallest MF setup and truly hand holdable
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by cng View Post

    Unfortunately, as we all know, compromises abound when selecting gear. Seeing as this is the MF forum and you sound as if you are really keen on an Alpa (who could blame you? ), then please let us know your final choice and how you find working with it.
    Yes, I am very keen. I'll make contact with Alpa and also Phase and get their view as to suitability of their new backs for my purposes. You're so right about compromises though and I'll certainly not make any rash or impulsive judgements on this one until I've exhausted my research. Of course I'll let you know how i get on.

    Thanks to all for your input. It's been very valuable.

    Dubois

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    Re: ALPA TC

    I would like to add that if your files don't need to be too big (gallery) then a 35mmFF should suffice. I've used a Canon 1dsMK II for magazine covers that have fantastic resolution, and the battery would never stop! That camera was impressive with it's weather sealing and great glass! I would never bring a MFD like an H4D on a remote shoot, terrible batteries and many points of entry for dust. If you want bigger files than a 35mm, than consider a Leica S2. I've shot with the Leica S2 and was instructed by David Farkas of Dale Photo (highly recommended) to go out and shoot in the worst weather. Although reluctant, I did, and the camera was amazing, IMO, Leica glass is the best there is without the need for computer corrections, it takes fantastic images right in the camera.

    The Alpa 12 TC is on my list too, and many use these specifically for back country landscapes, but portraits could be tricky up close. I love it's portability and the fact there's no mirror box to stir up dust and the image plane is right there, resulting in fantastic resolution, something a DSLR can never compete with...IMO. With the right adapter it too, can shoot film. Since it seems you don't require movements, than your choice of Phase backs is plenty, no extra battery is needed. Just make sure your image circle is adequate and enjoy the high ISO that some Phase DB's with micro lenses provide. Just use the histogram for exposure and the DB for composition and hyperfocal for DOF. Lastly, The easy to carry M9 also takes great portraits and landscapes albeit, slower, more deliberate, but the results are outstanding.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    I own most of the above, including a TC, (and an STC, and a MAX, and a 645DF, and Canons, blah...) and would agree that taking a TC + back + helicoid lenses is not a good idea in a dusty place. It is not a robust weather proof combo and *eats batteries*. You should be taking a 1Ds2/3 or similar dSLR, if it must be MF, then an S2 is a good idea, (used one for weeks, don't own) though their price is ridiculous. A TC is small, but with a digiback, is not the answer for "primitive" places and your need to tolerate dust, rain etc. If your travel is genuinely stressful on gear above normal (all travel requires some care of camera equipment) then a component Technical Camera with fine tolerances, complicated connector leads, and constant need for power sources, is probably *not* the right answer.

    It sounds to me that you like the look and idea of a TC, and are letting your heart talk your head into it. Which I know only too well.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by narikin View Post

    It sounds to me that you like the look and idea of a TC, and are letting your heart talk your head into it. Which I know only too well.
    Why do I KNOW that you're right and why don't I like you pointing it out?
    Maybe it's because my wife (if only she knew) would say exactly the same thing

    Seriously: Thanks for your valuable input.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    You should also look at the Cambo Wide Travel Camera which is Cambo's (very similar) take on a Travel Camera. Full disclosure: we sell Cambo but stopped selling Alpa a year or so ago.

    I don't have time to list the advantages and disadvantages tonight, but there are a few of each.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    And have you seen or looked toward the Arca-Swiss RM2d? Has a wider focusing range than the cameras mentioned so far. 1/2 again as close in far finer focus settings than the others and so light. Also an extremely smooth geared rise fall and easy to hand hold.

    With the movements in the rear and the integral focus in the front it is a very small extremely accurate and precise package. Also RM2d's weight is less than when grips added to Alpa TC.
    Worth a look anyway.
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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by RodK View Post
    ....
    With the movements in the rear and the integral focus in the front it is a very small extremely accurate and precise package. Also RM2d's weight is less than when grips added to Alpa TC.
    I believe this is not correct. The Alpa TC is 220g and the new wood grip is 106g, so a total of 326g which is less than HALF the weight of the RM2d at 700g, if I read the Arca-Swiss brochure correctly.

    Cheers, -Peter

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    Member David Duffin's Avatar
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    Re: ALPA TC

    If comparing the TC or STC (with grips) with Arca Rm2d, I'd definitely try holding each in your hand to see which is the better fit. I've found one of them much more awkward to handhold, or even lift out of your camera bag without danger of dropping, because of smaller, more slippery grips that don't fit the hand very well...

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by rdubois View Post
    My travels take me to interesting but primitive places. The nature of the work I'm involved in and need to document puts considerable stress on my camera gear which must tolerate dust, sometimes rain, dirt and rough travel conditions.
    Weather sealing?

    As someone who has travelled round the world with camera gear including camping in Botswana, remote areas of China, humidity, beach, dust, horseback, walk glacier, desert and more ... my humble opinion is that weather sealing is not not a necessity for most camera gear and much a marketing hype.

    Over last number of years my gear has included MFDB, Mamiya 645, M8, 6x7, 617, 4x5. The most important is to protect your gear during travels, and to care well for your equipment. When out shooting one need to keep it reasonably protected. If in rain a simple plastic bag with punched hole for lens and taped to lens hood works well.

    However, if for some reason one would have the gear inside bag in a rainstorm or dust storm one needs to be extra careful that the gear is protected. If bag gets wet, when back to camp need take gear out and make certain it is dry or be dried, and that bag dries.

    Apart from above, if one indeed need to shoot in middle of a rain storm or sand storm.... then weather sealing must be needed. How many --- hands up --- has done this and gotten good pictures??? Anyone???

    1. All gear I have owned from new has been in like new condition when I have sold it, or with very minor blemishes as I honest have stated when selling, but function wise as new. It comes from being careful with them and keeping them well protected. Still I use my gear as TOOLS, to take images and not afraid to go remote areas with them. Else what would be point?

    2. Thanks Tenba for my trustable Tenba PBP (Photoback pack). It is not made anymore but responsible for me having been able to carry my gears over nearly ten years of travels in safety and well protected. Fortunately I also have a backup PBP with which I will soon replace my near ten year old one with. A poster on Nikonians recommended me around 2002 of the Tenba saying he had travelled worldwide with it and it was one of his best pieces of camera gear. I can much make same statement. Only too bad they not make that very good travel series of backpacks anymore, it was the best. The bag is important, and there is not necessarily a need for a Pelican.

    Alpa?

    I am considering the STC. Should be no problem to travel with anywhere if well protected. If worry use zip lock bags. I frequent use that for my Leaf back, and no worry to bring that one ANYWHERE either, but I keep in zip lock and ensure it is dry when travel in humid conditions or over water. Light sprinkles of rain is no problem. If more rain when shooting an umbrella works fine!

    Enjoy the travels!

    Regards
    Anders

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    Re: ALPA TC

    I've been shooting my landscapes with a Cambo WRS for slightly over 2 years now and while it is hand-hold able I wouldn't recommend it. I'll be trying out the Cambo Compact beginning next week and should be able to report on it Shorty.

    I saw the Alpa TC while visiting Ken Doo in Monterey last month and it got be thinking about a slightly smaller (the WRS is already small) and lighter weight camera to pack in and shoot slot canyons and cliff dwellings.

    While there isn't much on the web about the Cambo Compact I wouldn't discount it as an alternative.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Don,
    The Cambo Wide Compact is a nice little system. I have a few clients that are using it.


    It is a great compliment to existing users of the Cambo RS and DS since it will share the same lens boards. It is also a great value.

    The one thing is that the handle is a little bulky and only on the side. So if you have smaller hands (not you) it may be a little cumbersome. It is also bit on the heavy side @ 700gr w/o lens.

    I also like that it has hooks on it for a neck-strap and two spirit levels (the little things that sometimes get overlooked).

    Looking forward to hearing how you like it.

    Lance
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    Re: ALPA TC

    I travel to some extreme places with cambo rs and ziploc bags in tow. I use the rs handheld when I have to and feel it is a comfortable fit for me. (I am adding strap posts to it though. Hanging over the edge of a boat shooting ice flows in Antarctica was a bit disconcerting).

    My thought has been that the iq and resolution is worth having the lenses cleaned more often. The copal shutter is the weakest link (more due to cold than dust or water in my experience) but fortunately have had no failures that rendered the system unusable. The phase backs are built like tanks and I often shoot my t/c in wet and dusty blowing conditions. A modest bill for cleaning after a trip is worth the difference in IQ. That said, I do carry a lot of batteries.

    While the d3x is a great camera I don't think it can be considered in any way near mfdb quality in terms of color, dr, and resolution. Sometimes you don't have a choice to use mfdb (primarily when stabilized lenses are a requirement for conditions) and the d3x fits that bill nicely. At full resolution I have found my p65 very comparable in higher iso to the d3x especially when considering you have almost triple the resolution. Neither one is useable over iso 400 but there is sensor+ which is a godsend.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    This has been a very interesting discussion and thanks to all for the given opinions and also suggestions to look at alternatives to the Alpa.

    Having done substantial more research it really does seem to me that the Alpa TC is the only camera of this type which can seriously be considered small enough for extensive travel. I come back to the photo of Guy with the Alpa on a Nikon grip which shows that this is indeed a very small package. Interestingly, the alternatives always seem to be shown attached to a tripod or at least a tripod mount. Something I'm really not looking for.

    I'm less concerned with ruggedness of the digital backs than I am with the relative delicate nature of the exposed lens. Ruggedness is dependant on many aspects; not just weather sealing and in my view almost more important is the capacity of a camera type to withstand knocks and bumps. Contrary to some of your comments, I've never had a camera which looked pristine after a year or two of usage. In ruggedness terms the Nikon D3 is very good and can withstand a lot of unintentional abuse.

    As I've agreed in an earlier post, my heart is stronger than my head in this decision which I know is silly but nonetheless the TC seems like a very good package which may well answer my requirements.

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Something you might also consider is that, at least for the wide angles (40-47mm) I have been looking at, the Schneider lenses are more compact than the Rodenstock. Also some of the lenses that do not project a large image circle might be an adequate choice for a back with no movements

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    Re: ALPA TC

    I really don't understand why there's so little information available regarding the Cambo Compact, the only images I've been able to pull up are similar to what Lance posted - all product shots. I've been able find the dimensions and compared them to my WRS. The WRS is 6.10"x6.49" (155x165m) and the Compact is 6.49"x5.90" (165x150m). The weight difference is 1.1 pound in favor of the Compact. So without anything else to guide me it appears the Compact is slightly less bulky as the WRS which is svelte and weighs less. I should be getting the Compact Monday and plan to post a heck of a lot more images of it than there already are.

    I'd like to add on to what Ed has added to his reply as well. I too go places that are extreme in nature. I've shot at the bottom of waterfalls in Yosemite, in snow, sleet, cold weather in Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Jackson Hole to name a few. I've also shot in what I consider is very close to a rain forest in Northern California in the Redwoods. Then there is Death Valley which is on the other extreme, sandy, windy, dust/sand storms etc.

    While shooting a technical camera isn't the same as using a Canon 1DsIII or Phase/Mamiya 645 it is not as delicate as what I first thought. My P45+ has never given me a moments problems being wet, cold or dusty - of course I limit removing the back, changing orientation as much as I can and usually can shoot a day's worth of images with one-card. The only problem I've ever really encountered with the back is little grains of sand getting in the way of fully inserting the battery in a battery change however I found a decent workaround so that doesn't bother me.

    The lenses I use are all Schneider (not that it matters) however I pre-select the focal length I want to use and try every hard to never swap lenses in the middle of a shot. I have swapped lenses and have found by moving the camera (on the Cube) down wind I can swap a lens in seconds thus keeping as much weather out as possible. Of course it helps if you have 3-hands which isn't always the case for me.

    So I guess the question remains - is a technical camera as sturdy, weather resistant as say a 645 body? I'd say it's close if you take proper precautions (I always carry a large plastic bag) - then again a 645 normally isn't as weather resistant as say our Canon 1DsIII.

    Best of luck to you.

    Don
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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by rdubois View Post
    I'm less concerned with ruggedness of the digital backs than I am with the relative delicate nature of the exposed lens.
    Considering that large format lenses of current robust design have been around alot longer than other lenses, this should be a no issue provided cared for properly.

    The mere difference in the new digital compared to traditional film large format lenses are the optics and tolerances for digital. Apart from that a Rodenstock HR or old Schneider with Copal looks amazing same .

    Regards
    Anders

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    Something you might also consider is that, at least for the wide angles (40-47mm) I have been looking at, the Schneider lenses are more compact than the Rodenstock. Also some of the lenses that do not project a large image circle might be an adequate choice for a back with no movements
    This is another thing which attracts me to Alpa: the sheer choice of lenses and accessories and options. The Alpa seems a very mature system and a mature company with a great website. This especially compared to the Arca Swiss which has no website at all and after a week since I sent an email I'm still waiting for details of the RM2D

    @ Don Libby: your experiences are very encouraging

    @ Anders "Considering that large format lenses of current robust design have been around alot longer than other lenses, this should be a no issue provided cared for properly." I'm sure you're right but they look more delicate or less streamlined especially the shutter release which look as if they can easily be caught in branches and collect dust and mud. The experiences of some of you seem to indicate however that the Alpa has been used in rougher conditions and has stood up well!

  29. #29
    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: ALPA TC

    Dubois

    You might want to consider contacting dealers directly regarding the Arca product info. In my experience they are very helpful and knowledgeable whether Alpa, Arca or others.

    Btw, if you are looking at Alpa then you might want also to look at the new iPhone viewfinder solution. Mine arrived today and so far I'm impressed with the hi-tech option plus it clips off for a small package on the camera when packing it away. Horrible price but then again on the flip side it IS cheaper than the optical finder (which isn't saying much I know!) assuming that you don't already have one - more accurate too so far in my very limited testing. The downside vs optical VF is that you'll need a wide angle adapter for the iPhone for super-wides beyond 35mmfor example.

    Good luck with your quest!!
    Last edited by GrahamWelland; 17th March 2011 at 23:22. Reason: Added iphone VF downside
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"

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    Re: ALPA TC

    the RM2D is smaller than the RM3Di but share the same mount... you can also mount your R lens on an M line... a complete system !



    and the view finder is the best on the market !


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    Re: ALPA TC

    Graham:
    Hah! i am just finishing a design for an Iphone holder that i will be manufacturing. should have the first one made next week. It will fit a standard hotshoe and let the phone rotate 90 degrees on the phone's lens axis to frame portait or landscape. last detail i am trying to add is a parallax adjustment so you can tune the viewfinder frame to match the camera.

    won't cost $560 either.

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    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: ALPA TC

    John: Very cool! There's certainly a market out there for this.

    I originally tried one of the plastic tripod iPhone solutions but they definitely lacked parallax correction, not to mention no resiliency at all. The Alpa holder is very well made with precise detents for symmetric/parallax corrected locations and the sprung holder has shaped inserts for iPhone 4/3/Touch etc.

    Btw, $560? Unfortunately it's $730 from Alpa
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    John: Very cool! There's certainly a market out there for this.
    Btw, $560? Unfortunately it's $730 from Alpa
    It has always been and will always be more expensive to have special preferences .

    A glance at a ROLEX gives you the same time as a glance to any other watch.
    But you looked at a ROLEX etc. etc.

    Yes , very cool , John . Show us images of your device .
    Regards . Jürgen .
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: ALPA TC

    Quote Originally Posted by jotloob View Post
    It has always been and will always be more expensive to have special preferences .

    A glance at a ROLEX gives you the same time as a glance to any other watch.
    But you looked at a ROLEX etc. etc.
    True, although I do feel that we get charged the platinum rolex price for albeit a nice aluminum/steel product.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"

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    Re: ALPA TC any last advice?

    Well, with some trepidation I've decided to go for the TC with Apo-Switar 5.6/36 mm and leaf aptus ii 7 although chickening out some by keeping the D3s.

    Any last advice before I sign the cheque and how do I break this to "she who must be obeyed"??

    Dubois

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Dubois,

    Check out the Really Right Stuff MPR-73 3/8 camera plate. It's long enough to allow nodal point panning, is very rigid, and even works as a sort of hand grip.

    Steve

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    Re: ALPA TC

    Dubois,
    Having shot LF and many classic cameras been rained on, shat on, slipped down muddy slopes and god knows what else in 30 - 45C 99% humidity tropical and sub tropical rain forest, with a PC cable between lens and back, the only thing to worry about is surely the digital back and in particular the cooling fan intakes/exhaust on the aptus 7. I think youll have a great time with that setup.

    I always use the mercedes argument with the missus (if i dont get my camera you wont get a merc - NO only kidding), i mean the resale value of this is much better than say getting a nikon or canon body today with all the new models immenent and stuff.
    Last edited by wentbackward; 25th June 2011 at 20:27. Reason: typo

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