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Thread: Panorama Technique

  1. #51
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    After having played around with CS 3, PtGui, and AutoPano Pro for the last few weeks I can better understand why some folks have more than one program for panos installed on their computers. Each of them has it's strengths and weaknesses and none of them is clearly superior to the others (IMHO... YMMV). Both PtGui and CS 3 refuse to render QuickTime movies for me on the grounds I have insufficient memory (I've got 10 GB, how much do they want..). Perhaps this is because I'm setting the rendering quality too high or starting with images that are too large, although I've gotten this error message even when using 8 full sized Nikon D3 jpegs in a single row, which doesn't strike me as overreaching.

  2. #52
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Some comments on the above.

    1. The exposure does not have to be fixed over the frames. However, preparing the frames for stitching can be *very* laborous. One should start out woth raw data and "equalize" the frames in raw conversion. Sometimes graduated transitions may be required, even more work for preparation.

    Equalizing the frames by the blending is an abuse of the process with usually horrendeous result, either as banding particularly on clear sky, or by ruined colors.

    2. The camera does not have to be level. In fact, in many cases it *can not* be level. However, the *plane of swiweling* needs to be level in order to avoid having to clip large segments.

    3. There is no need to shoot with fixed focusing. One can achieve a large DoF by shooting with a long lens (long relative to the scenery), so that nearby and far objects are in separate frames and refocusing every frame. However, refocusing changes the field of view; PTGui has to be notified about this (by unlinking the FoV).

    4. The father of stitchers is Panorama Tools. This is a package without human interface; Hugin (free), Panorama Tools Assembler (cheap) and PTGui (expensive) are based on Panorama Tools. These can stitch virtually everything, what is stitchable.

  3. #53
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    OK, here is a really stupid question.

    Why stitching?

    Need more resolution, or wider angles? I would think MFDB would supply enough resolution even if cropped down to panorama format.

    Obviously, some of the gorgeous shots above cover wider angles with less distortion than possible without stitching, but some seem to me to be within reasonable wide angle lens limits.

    What am I missing?

    Thanks,

    Mitchell

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    the widest angle lens I can use with my CFV back is 35mm; with the 1.5 crop, that is about 52mm equivalent field of view on a 6 x 6, which for a 35mm camera would be the same as...a 33mm lens

  5. #55
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Mitchell,
    Why stitch...
    - Wider coverage (for example, don't have or didn't bring a wide enough lens).
    - Need more resolution
    - Cylindrical projection is desired

    You didn't define "enough resolution". If you did, someone would always find or invent a need for more resolution.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Thanks Lars and Jim for explaining this.

    Makes sense especially with the crop factors with DB's.

  7. #57
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    I've got a trip planned to the Grand Canyon; North Rim in October and South Rim in December. The Grand Canyon screams for large images (which I enjoy doing) and the Mamiya 28 fits that bill. What I'm going to attempt to do is multiple row, multiple column images for large panoramas (or a poor man's way to large format). We've had our monsoon season here in Tucson for several weeks now bringing with it very lovely clouds especially in the evening. I've been watching the evening skies for the past couple nights and unfortunately haven't been in a position to capture anything till last night. What better way to test my panorama skills!

    This first image is a sample image of a single capture with the Mamiya 28mm lens; right out of the camera it measures 21.733x16.217 inches (6520 x 4585 pixels @ 300 ppi).



    I experimented using the 28 lens in capturing 2 rows 2 columns to be merged into one large image. That image turned out to be 33.56x27.79 inches (10068 x 8337 pixels @ 300ppi) cropped to what I thought is a useable 28.237x21.37 inches (8471 x 6411 pixels).



    I then took the cropped image and worked it into a quasi-panorama measuring 16x28.



    Bottom line for me is that single row panoramas are much easier that multiple row.

    Here's one of my first panoramas (I remember taking over 8 images for this one)



    Why use stitching?

    My answer: There's no such thing as too much or too large or too much detail.

    Lars is totally correct ....

    don

    Don Libby
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell View Post
    OK, here is a really stupid question.

    Why stitching?

    Need more resolution, or wider angles? I would think MFDB would supply enough resolution even if cropped down to panorama format.

    Obviously, some of the gorgeous shots above cover wider angles with less distortion than possible without stitching, but some seem to me to be within reasonable wide angle lens limits.

    What am I missing?

    Thanks,

    Mitchell
    Mitchell,
    No stupid questions here... to me the only truly stupid questions are the ones we don't ask for fear of appearing stupid In addition to the good answers you've already gotten I find stitching gives me an opportunity to go wider than I otherwise could without having to deal with the distortion that some wides inevitably bring to the table. I recall trying to use my Nikon 14-24 zoom at the wide end for architectural interiors. Got the coverage but also got one heck of a lot of distortion that had to be dealt with in post. Found I could get far better results using the Nikon 24 PC-E shifted left, then right and stitched with the same FOV as the 14mm and virtually no distortion.

  9. #59
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Need to get me a RRS pano head setup . This might be my answer
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    just watch out that nothing changes between shots...like moving leaves, clouds, the light, etc. though branches and objects with sharp outlines are the most pesky. i have seen a few cases where the same person (poltergeist?) appeared in more than one place in the final image. an interesting effect

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    Need to get me a RRS pano head setup . This might be my answer
    Like this?



    don
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    just watch out that nothing changes between shots...like moving leaves, clouds, the light, etc. though branches and objects with sharp outlines are the most pesky. i have seen a few cases where the same person (poltergeist?) appeared in more than one place in the final image. an interesting effect
    You're correct - the hardest panos I've done so far is with water and/or fast moving clouds. Once you have it all set up you've got to be fast in taking the images otherwise you'll need to restart. I normally do several dry runs making sure I have my overlaps and timing before I take the first image.

    don
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    This was one I was testing a couple days ago from my back yard. 2 rows 3 columns merged the image measured 26x41 or 12332 by 8072 pixels @ 300 ppi. I think Im ready for the Grand Canyon.



    don

    forgot to add the lens info: 75-150 shot at 150
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Creek View Post
    Like this?



    don

    Thanks Don my issue is wider angle . So I thought camera in vertical than just a single row pano of 3 or 4 images just to get me very wide for interiors. OrI could do the setup you have and looks like doing a multi level Pano for even bigger. I mayjust have to get one and see what i can do with it
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  15. #65
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    Thanks Don my issue is wider angle . So I thought camera in vertical than just a single row pano of 3 or 4 images just to get me very wide for interiors. OrI could do the setup you have and looks like doing a multi level Pano for even bigger. I may just have to get one and see what i can do with it
    Wish I had that lens you got there . Making me jealous. LOL
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    Thanks Don my issue is wider angle . So I thought camera in vertical than just a single row pano of 3 or 4 images just to get me very wide for interiors. OrI could do the setup you have and looks like doing a multi level Pano for even bigger. I mayjust have to get one and see what i can do with it
    Just switch the orientation from landscape to portrait, thats what I shot the test image; 2 rows 3 columns at however I found I dont really need to do that with the 28 as landscape works just fine.
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Sounds good Don. I will have to get into this
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    Sounds good Don. I will have to get into this
    Guy Give me a call anytime you find yourself near Tucson and Ill let you try this setup out.

    don
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Or, if you can wait till the lighting workshop, use mine... Don makes an interesting (and valid point) about the timing with respect to moving clouds, etc. I've found that sometimes the opposite is true when shooting scenes with water. A slower shutter speed can smooth the water out and make the stitch easier.

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    Need to get me a RRS pano head setup . This might be my answer
    Guy

    I use the RRS pano assembly and it works a charm..........including working on your pocketbook LOL. You could buy a pretty darned good lens for what these guys charge for their iron! WOW

    Woody

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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Thanks everyone.
    There's always something more to learn and buy. !:^)

    Best,

    Mitchell

  22. #72
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Thanks folks . David let's try it out in Florida. I have some upcoming interiors to do when I get back and i want to be armed for the worst. I scouted one house out today and this bathroom is a nightmare.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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  23. #73
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Don next time in Tucson let's do lunch. I would love to get together and chew the fat as they say.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  24. #74
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    Don next time in Tucson let's do lunch. I would love to get together and chew the fat as they say.
    Guy - Sounds good to me I think it's about time we met.

    don
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    Re: Panorama Technique

    Single row, three images, merged in CS3... taken with the Rollei 80mm 2.8 at around f/11 and 1 sec. It was getting dark and I was getting eaten alive by bugs. Need to remember to put bug spray in my pano kit.

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