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Thread: Lenses for panoramic stitching

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    Lenses for panoramic stitching

    Hi there

    Newbie here just getting to grips with the right equipment - I used to shoot 4x10" film on a view camera for landscape and architecture and am now converting to a MFD kit for ease of use and portability mainly.

    To get the panoramic format I'm intending on using technical camera shifts rather than panning. Therefore the Cambo Wide RS fits the bill and has a nice 40mm shift (-20/+20) horizontal and 35mm vertical (-25/+15).

    In the search for lenses I've stumbled across the Rodenstock 55mm 4.5 which has an image circle of 125mm @ F11. With film lenses I'm used to ICs of over 350mm, but 125mm is great for a digital lens.


    With a 48x36mm sensor, this lens would give 47 degrees of horizontal field of view, about the same as a 41mm lens on 35mm format, so not that wide.

    However if using the full 40mm horizontal shift available on the Cambo WRS, I'd get a total sensor area of 88x36mm with 2 shots (8mm overlap), and therefore the horizontal field of view would stretch to 77degrees. About the same horizontal field of view as a 23mm lens on 35mm. Room for rise and fall is there too with the IC of 125mm. Perhaps I could also not have to stop-down to F11 to avoid diffraction. Maybe at F8 it would still cover?

    I made the diagram attached, I think my workings are correct - have I gone wrong anywhere?!

    I like the sound of the pixels available at 88x36mm of captured image!


    Should I be looking at other similar lenses, that are available in the WRS panels?


    Thanks in advance

    TMH

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    Senior Member yaya's Avatar
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    Re: Lenses for panoramic stitching

    Hi TMH, I think you've done the math right

    Just thinking out loud...if budget allows and if you can stretch to a 56x36mm back (Aptus-II 10 or 10R) then you could get 96x36mm with a 16mm overlap, which normally helps the stitching with images that don't have too much detail in them (e.g. clouds).

    Yair
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    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
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    Re: Lenses for panoramic stitching

    You may find this helpful too for easily calculating movements etc:
    http://www.alpa.ch/en/products/tools...movements.html

    Btw, I'd caution against using the full shift of the camera (i.e. 20mm L/R) because of the inevitable effects of lens casts and fall off with extreme movements. Personally I'd consider keeping the movements within 15mm or so to avoid the gross effects of LCC quality drop off.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

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    Re: Lenses for panoramic stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by yaya View Post
    Hi TMH, I think you've done the math right

    Just thinking out loud...if budget allows and if you can stretch to a 56x36mm back (Aptus-II 10 or 10R) then you could get 96x36mm with a 16mm overlap, which normally helps the stitching with images that don't have too much detail in them (e.g. clouds).

    Yair

    Thanks - good to know my workings are OK!

    As for the sensor, I'll be starting off with a 48x36mm whilst I learn with an entry-level back, and then move larger later.


    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    You may find this helpful too for easily calculating movements etc:
    http://www.alpa.ch/en/products/tools...movements.html

    Btw, I'd caution against using the full shift of the camera (i.e. 20mm L/R) because of the inevitable effects of lens casts and fall off with extreme movements. Personally I'd consider keeping the movements within 15mm or so to avoid the gross effects of LCC quality drop off.
    Nice resource from Alpa - thanks for forwarding. As for movements, I did think that using the full 20mm might get me close to the edge of quality, even if it's well within the IC. I guess with 125mm to play with I should be ok with 20mm shift, but exercise caution if using any major rise and fall and therefore perhaps use less shift.


    Thanks

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