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Thread: Cambo owners - shimming the back

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    Cambo owners - shimming the back

    As I go through my options for a tech cam, the cambo WRS keeps drawing me in as a great balance of size with movements. The other option is the RM3Di, but it is a little bigger and the has 10mm less movement left to right. I could flip it, but that is another work around.

    One major question I have is whether the Cambo can be shimmed. The Arca and Apla offer what appears to be a very precise mechanism for doing this. I have read on this board and process for adjusting 4 screws on the Cambo to achieve the same. Has anyone tried this and is it as "idiot proof" (important in my context) as the mechanisms in the other two? Are the results comparable?

    I will be using it with an IQ180. Thanks for any help and thoughts.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    You can shim the body. I never did it but I did calibrate some lenses which for me was easy as I shot tethered and set my infinity deadly right on the mark. One of the Cambo reps can speak more about the body but I found no need. I did adjust the plate so my back fit more tightly to it. Also our dealers here can probably do this for you as we'll.
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Thanks Guy. You were one of the people I was hoping would comment.

    When you say you adjusted the plate for a better fit, was this just manipulating the plate or something more by design to allow you to do this?

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Here's a few links that might be of interest:

    http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/medium...djustment.html
    http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/240696-post4572.html
    Cambo Wide RS Tips 'n' Tricks

    I just calbrated my Cambo lenses, it's not a big deal to do...
    Also adjusted the adapter plate as described in the first link, now my back and the adapter is like one solid piece.

    Peter

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Thanks Peter. I did not realize you could adjust the lenses this easily. This does appear make equalize the whole shimming issue for the Cambo.

    Thank again.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Yes it works really well the adapter plate has actual washers in it that you can remove and adjust your back. That's the first thing to do. Than tether your laptop and see if the infinity mark is dead on . If not than adjust lenses my 35xl was really off my 60 was perfect and 90 very slightly.
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    I've been using the WRS for longer than I can remember and just never felt the need to shim the body. Still don't.

    Don
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    I've been using the WRS for longer than I can remember and just never felt the need to shim the body. Still don't.
    Don,

    As someone who have been looking into tach cam for awhile, I wonder if you have tested your WRS to ensure of its focus accuracy?

    Best regards,
    Anders

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    If I understand the differences between Cambo, Alpa and Arca;

    1. Alpa is the only one who permit shimming of the back to a camera system , which (assumably) is calibrated to within tolerances. The advantage is that groundglass likewise is (assumably) calibrated from factory to that system, and that one can use someone elses lens which will be equally sharp due within tolerance to the system.

    Likewise Alpa is the only one who have their lenses calibrated/adjusted by Schneider and Rodenstock.

    2. Cambo permits calibration of lenses by user. That makes the lenses match any tolerance in location of sensor in digital back. However, downside appear to be the groundglass not being calibrated to the sensor in back and thus that it is rather useless to arrive at perfect sharp focus (unless if with luck the groundglass from factory match the sensor plane perfect)? Likewise, if borrowing a lens from someone it will likely not match the camera system or sensor.

    Then, what is frank point of shimming the back of a Cambo?? Or rather, how can one calibrate/shim the groundglass plane to be in perfect with the sensor plane?

    3. Arca permit for table look up of offset factors to account for tolerance in digital back. Then same as Cambo the groundglass will not be in tolerence for focus accuracy??

    Am I understanding the above correct?

    Please do not get me wrong. I have been looking at Alpa for quite awhile but find indeed the Cambo RS400 and RS5000 very interesting alternatives. Getting tolerances perfect for Cambo though seem somewhat an issue if one wants to be able to have the option to also use groundglass for precise focus. Additionally, the fact that Alpa sends lenses to Schneider and Rodenstock is assuring.

    Appreciate any insight from users!

    Thanks!!!

    Best regards,
    Anders

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Frankly I find the ground glass to be "useless to arrive at perfect sharp focus" anyway. At least when talking about focusing exactly the detail from an 80mp image (that can be easily printed a meter wide) on a 645 sized ground glass. Even with a good brightscreen and a great loupe and patience it's not for the feint of heart.

    Anyway, keep in mind that "shimming" is a really fancy word for putting a piece of thin metal sheet between two components. So just about anything that can be removed from a system (easily, or by means of disassembly) can be shimmed if it's really important to you.
    Doug Peterson , Digital Transitions | Email
    Dealer for: Phase One, Mamiya Leaf, Arca-Swiss, Cambo, Eizo, Profoto
    Office: 877.367.8537. Cell: 740.707.2183
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    I'm with Doug on the ground glass use. It's a kludge to even use it and many folks don't bother. I never found the need myself. Also you have some marketing going on here. If your focus is dead on with your back than shimming will do nothing for you. All it really does is get you align with a graphically number like 10 ft for example well there is play in any lens and the markings for 10 ft could actually be 11 ft. Yes even with the nice focus rings that Alpa uses it still can be off. Arca has offsets which work really nice but with Cambo calibrating your lenses works just as well. End of day all you care about is nailing focus any IQ back will tell you that in a second with focus mask or 100 percent zoom , really who cares if the graphical number is off. In effect all three systems do exactly the same thing they just do it differently. I never had a issue once I calibrated my lenses. Also if you set it up for the ground glass than even they have play in them. BTW you can shim a Cambo body I just don't know anyone that has even bothered when its easy to calibrate a lens to a so called numerical number. That's all any of them do anyway.
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    In my case, GG is out of the question. As Doug mentions, at least for me, it does not offer the level of resolution to justify all the troubles of going to a tech camera, i.e., I will not realise the full value of the "hypothetical" quality of the IQ180 and tech lenses.

    For this reason, I will likely rely on a rangefinder and/or live view. So precision of the GG vs. compensated for lenses is not an issue.

    More of an issue of course is ability to focus accurately. I am still pondering this one.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    I tried using a ground glass for almost a year and found it all but useless for what I do. While it did offer "some" benefits they simply weren't worth the it. Stoped using it and sold it shortly afterwards. I'm now shooting with a IQ160 attached and have so far found that to be one of if not the very best back I've had the pleasure using (started out with a P45+ then P65). The IQ series is made for a tech camera.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Well, if there were no accuracy in using a goundglass there would be no possibility for arriving sharp focus using an 80MP back on a Techno or with any sliding adapter, right? Unless tethered or live view...

    On a Cambo with lens movements, then how would you focus accurate without shooting tethered or live view? That seems when a groundglass would be needed, or??? Say e.g. you have three redwood trees that you want to compose for them to be in sharpest DOF but they are lined up at 45 degree to camera? Is not that a case for when an accurate shimmed groundglass would be necessary?

    Thanks!

    Best regards,
    Anders

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Honest answer its all guess work unless you have live view or focus mask to confirm it. Ground glass on tech cams is nothing like a 4x5 its very hard. You can certainly do it but I bet your still going to want to confirm it after you took the shot. Just not so sure you want to rely on it solely unless your doing studio work and a lot easier to deal with it but there you have tethered.
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Totally agree with Guy on this one. I tried the ground glass route for focus and quickly found it all but useless (FOR ME). Others may find it better. The best use I found the groundglass for was using a filter. This of course was before the IQ came along.

    Anders - to answer you question - no I've never really tested my WRS as I've simply never felt the need. That said, of course I suppose it couldn't hurt.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Quote Originally Posted by Anders_HK View Post
    On a Cambo with lens movements, then how would you focus accurate without shooting tethered or live view? That seems when a groundglass would be needed, or??? Say e.g. you have three redwood trees that you want to compose for them to be in sharpest DOF but they are lined up at 45 degree to camera? Is not that a case for when an accurate shimmed groundglass would be necessary?
    Anders,

    The answer to your question is iteration. You take many shots to get the focus correct, making small adjustments of focus and tilt/swing each time, and examining the effect with focus mask or 100% zoom. This is very different from GG focusing, but works extremely well. With large memory cards and a fast back, it is a quick and relatively painless exercise.

    The attached file shows two shots from such a focus/compose sequence. The bright green is the Focus Mask, not the foliage! The extra green in the foreground of the second frame is the Focus Mask indicating improvement.

    Best,

    Matt
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    And really if you get right down to it. It's very much like shooting Polaroids but much quicker. I think and work with tech cams in that fashion. No matter how perfect the camera setup is you still wind up confirming every shot but that comes after the shot really either by focus mask, 100 percent zooming and such. Live view as we know with MF is no Nikon or Canon setup until these sensors become CMOS than things will change.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Quote Originally Posted by MGrayson View Post
    The answer to your question is iteration. You take many shots to get the focus correct, making small adjustments of focus and tilt/swing each time, and examining the effect with focus mask or 100% zoom.
    Above seem tedious as compared to using GG focusing. Joe Cornish write of using IQ180 on Techno (from IQ180 - First Three Months - Impressions - On LandscapeOn Landscape)

    "... I am getting such great results with the Techno and the sliding back (and my Silvestri 10x loupe)"

    "I make no bones about, 54 wins by a mile for viewing. But, once accepted and persevered with I have found my ability to compose upside down on a ground glass screen at this size is perfectly possible. I often use a Hasselblad ‘top’ viewer, which has a 3x magnifier and shows the whole screen. I finish the process with a Silvestri 10x loupe, and this gives me reasonable security that I have done any tilt adjustments correctly. In practice, setting up a Techno and a medium format back actually takes me a little bit more time and trouble than a 5x4inch Ebony. Of course all the preceding comments would apply to any technical view camera used with this format and not just the Techno."


    The use of a 10x or 6x may also depend on the GG used. A Maxwell GG has been said to be brighter than Cambo, Alpa and Arca GG, and I would assume also the Linhof. Thus perhaps a 6x Rodenstock Aspheric Loupe would suffice using a bright Maxwell GG ???

    However, the GG need to be perfect (within a tolerance) in plane with the sensor in the digital back. With Alpa that seem not a problem since the back is shimmed to the camera system. However, does Cambo offer any means to adjust the GG to the senor in back, or how would you shim the back interface to be perfect in plane to the GG???

    Anyone with experience?

    Thanks!

    Best regards,
    Anders

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    you can, using screw adjustments, effectively "shim" the cambo, but you are basically using the images created as a measure of success, and the lens is set at infinity.
    n not sure if alpa offers a different solution, using metal shims rather than screw adjustment

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    My Linhof Techno review goes into depth of ground-glass precision and focusing.

    Focusing a 3D landscape scene is quite different from focusing say indoor architecture, or focusing straight onto a wall or similar.

    Landscape shooting f/11 can surely be done successfully with ground glass, but it is still not for everyone. I have got the sense that Joe Cornish does not really have the pixel-peep sickness like the rest of us . I use a 20x loupe to focus my Techno and then mistakes is very rare when working with an f/11 DoF.

    The largest and most damaging myth concerning modern ground glass focusing is that you should not use high magnification loupes because you then only see grain. Quite the opposite, I'd say if you don't use a proper 20x you're not maximizing the potential. With a 20x you do see some grain structure, but that does not mean that you don't see more detail. It's just like looking closely at film -- resolution is considerably higher than the largest grains.

    I'd say that the 10x like Joe Cornish uses is too low magnification for safe results, I have the exact same loupe so I have tried it. If you have very good eyes it may work well though, and for scenes when you do tilting (quite frequent in landscape) it is hard to fail.

    Ground glass focusing just like manual focusing with MF SLRs is something that requires training and skill, and to some extent good eyes.

    It also is a bit dependent on how you look upon focus accuracy. The DoF is generally always too short to have perfect sharpness over the whole frame. Does it really matter exactly where the peak focus is? Focusing on a brick wall it surely does, but in landscape I find that in 90% of the scenes there is a quite big tolerance on focus placement, i e if you happen to miss a bit you're not really making a worse picture.

    All this makes us see statements about ground glass ranging from "it is totally impossible" to "it works perfectly every time". There's no absolute truth, it's a personal thing.
    Last edited by torger; 30th October 2012 at 02:30.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    1. Cambo specifically states that shimming the back is not advised for end users. The shims are simply different thickness of washers on four contact points in combination with screw adjustments on the same contact points so they calibrate a perfectly flat plane of focus. It would be extremely difficult to achieve acceptable results outside of a lab environment. Each lens is then calibrated for infinity focus on top of that. It creates a very specific system for assuring focus calibration at infinity only. It could be me but I have found their distance markings totally useless.

    2. I for one could never get accurate results using a ground glass. I wish I had the eyesight to determine real focus accuracy down to 5um. With live view, I am able to achieve 100% focus accuracy in moments without taking an exposure but rarely need to in 90% of my shots. Full frame focus is never any sharper than when you are at infinity and most of the shots posted on this site could be focused at infinity. I'm not saying 100% of the time but using mathematical focusing based on extensive testing I know for most scenes what the optimal focus will be even without checking it and which shots will be tricky enough to require focus confirmation using live view or a test exposure even prior to the fantastic workflow of the IQ series. I am sure that it would be slightly more critical for indoor architecture and even more so for product/still life photography but nothing will be more accurate than view actual pixels in the critical focus area of the frame.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Quote Originally Posted by Anders_HK View Post
    Above seem tedious as compared to using GG focusing.
    You've obviously never done this before...

    For focus, taking the picture and viewing (100%+) it is the only "accurate" way of insuring you are on target and it's easy. When you start taking things off or sliding things around, you are never going to be as accurate as looking at the picture, I don't care how "matched" things are. A simple variable such as heat (or lack of it) can take out all that painstaking machining/shimming work.

    If you shoot no faster that f8 and shorter that 90mm, a Disto D5 is more than enough. Quit obsessing and take some pictures already:)

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Tedious...

    That was part of the allure that working with a tech camera brings to me. Nothing is easy. Nothing is fast. Nothing is automatic nor automated.

    I stop. See something I think I'd like to capture; a place or moment in time, a feeling. Set the tripod up still looking at what I'm about to capture - redefining it in my head as I go along. Place the camera on the tripod - still thinking. By now I've got the image in my head and all I need to do is set the camera up.

    Focus the lens, cock the shutter, remember to turn the back on and remove the lens cap. Capture the image. Review it on the screen (now using the IQ160). Think about it and either move on or capture another either using a different f/stop or shutter speed or decide to do a shift movement.

    Thinking all the time. Almost Zen. Tedious? Wouldn't have it any other way; but that's me.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    It's a process for sure and a fun one at that. I shot with 2 Cambos and a Arca in Zion with the guys and I do miss it sometimes. That's a dangerous comment. Lol
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Tedious...

    That was part of the allure that working with a tech camera brings to me. Nothing is easy. Nothing is fast. Nothing is automatic nor automated.

    I stop. See something I think I'd like to capture; a place or moment in time, a feeling. Set the tripod up still looking at what I'm about to capture - redefining it in my head as I go along. Place the camera on the tripod - still thinking. By now I've got the image in my head and all I need to do is set the camera up.

    Focus the lens, cock the shutter, remember to turn the back on and remove the lens cap. Capture the image. Review it on the screen (now using the IQ160). Think about it and either move on or capture another either using a different f/stop or shutter speed or decide to do a shift movement.

    Thinking all the time. Almost Zen. Tedious? Wouldn't have it any other way; but that's me.

    Don
    +1
    Very much the same feel and workflow that I am used to. And I can definitely copy your last sentence - wouldn't have it any other way....
    Alpa FPS MAX TC | Alpagon 32Hr | Helvetar 75 | Schneider 120N | Leaf Aptus II 5 Leaf Credo 60 | www.danlindberg.com
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Quote Originally Posted by alan_w_george View Post
    You've obviously never done this before...
    Have not done what??? What I have done is shot on a Shen-Hao 4x5 view camera and achieved focus for a 28MP Leaf back. How good focus? Looked sharp even on SK SA 72XL and Rod 150 Sironar-N. Obvious it did not have fine adjustments for tilt and swing but I actually found the focus mechanism suffice... though obvious more crude than a helical! Yup, have done that using a 6x lupe. I also designed the custom made sliding adapter I used and it was fabricated for me by Shen-Hao. I used a Maxwell GG on it and did not end up using the adapter much because I found sliding adapter too tedious compared to 4x5 film. The gent I sold that adapter to replaced his late Mamiya adapter and said mine was better quality... go figure.

    I also attempted designing tech cameras with another Chinese company but they simply would not want to understand tolerances required for digital back... thus still looking for that tech camera for my personal use. Above was mere "fun" side opportunities outside my daily job in a complete different field of engineering...


    Quote Originally Posted by torger View Post
    My Linhof Techno review goes into depth of ground-glass precision and focusing.

    Focusing a 3D landscape scene is quite different from focusing say indoor architecture, or focusing straight onto a wall or similar.

    Landscape shooting f/11 can surely be done successfully with ground glass, but it is still not for everyone. I have got the sense that Joe Cornish does not really have the pixel-peep sickness like the rest of us . I use a 20x loupe to focus my Techno and then mistakes is very rare when working with an f/11 DoF.

    The largest and most damaging myth concerning modern ground glass focusing is that you should not use high magnification loupes because you then only see grain. Quite the opposite, I'd say if you don't use a proper 20x you're not maximizing the potential. With a 20x you do see some grain structure, but that does not mean that you don't see more detail. It's just like looking closely at film -- resolution is considerably higher than the largest grains.

    I'd say that the 10x like Joe Cornish uses is too low magnification for safe results, I have the exact same loupe so I have tried it. If you have very good eyes it may work well though, and for scenes when you do tilting (quite frequent in landscape) it is hard to fail.

    Ground glass focusing just like manual focusing with MF SLRs is something that requires training and skill, and to some extent good eyes.

    It also is a bit dependent on how you look upon focus accuracy. The DoF is generally always too short to have perfect sharpness over the whole frame. Does it really matter exactly where the peak focus is? Focusing on a brick wall it surely does, but in landscape I find that in 90% of the scenes there is a quite big tolerance on focus placement, i e if you happen to miss a bit you're not really making a worse picture.

    All this makes us see statements about ground glass ranging from "it is totally impossible" to "it works perfectly every time". There's no absolute truth, it's a personal thing.
    Based on my own brief experience I much share Torger's view. However, I believe that rather than using such high magnification for focus, a better GG will substantially help. The Maxwell one I used enabled a very bright view to point of even seeing the image on a bright sunny day as long as sun rays were not direct shining onto the GG. If I understand correct Maxwell can provide brighter GG than is offered by Cambo, Alpa, Arca and Linhof, but please correct me if someone have different information. Thus seems that for tech cam it can be advisable to similar for 4x5 to upgrade to a better GG.


    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Tedious...

    That was part of the allure that working with a tech camera brings to me.
    Same can be said of 4x5 +


    Quote Originally Posted by etrump View Post
    1. Cambo specifically states that shimming the back is not advised for end users.
    That makes sense. This one seems like taking camera apart and attempting a fix where should not be made;
    Quote Originally Posted by Pemihan View Post

    Notably the three screws on a Cambo "lens" is on the helical, provided by Schneider and should be same also on an Alpa. Those are for adjustment of the lens to the camera. Notably Cambo thus appear to adjust the camera to their tolerances per four screws at the mount for the back interface. Notably, there is no other means than the helical to adjust to the back. That seem as a weakness in the Cambo system, though it may work to adjust for also off tolerance in back and interface to the camera.

    That leads to the other weakness of the Cambo system, namely there appear to be no way for user to adapt the GG to the place of the sensor in the back. Then... there seems an obvious reason it will not be very good to use such GG for focus.

    Please do not get me wrong, no bashing, mere pointing out what I see. Any system have weaknesses, also Alpa (e.g. that they do not provide a scale for the new type of tilt adapters...).

    The Cambo should work, but the above weakness makes me tad ask questions of how prices the Cambo actually is. Take the RS5000 and similar camera that have two sliding planes. How perfect are those planes to the plane of the lens (image from lens) and the plane of sensor? What about a tilt lens and its indent? How perfect parallel does that ident permit the lens to the body? Does anyone know if there are any stated tolerances by Cambo? Perhaps it works, but... how perfect? Does it work as sharp and precise as a well adjusted Alpa?

    With Alpa, they permit using very thin shims to shim the back to the Alpa system. The Alpa system should (assumably) in itself be to very tight tolerances. Thus it should be possible to better (more assuringly) arrive at focus using a GG in the Alpa system. Are there indents on the Alpa tilt adapters and how perfect do they make the lens plane to the sensor plane?

    For sliding, Cambo uses rails and Alpa uses roller bearing. Per my understanding roller bearings are more precise.

    How precise do we need? Well, I will want to make the most from the sharp lenses...

    For me, Alpa STC is very interesting indeed, and very well thought out and smart cam. However, the Cambo RS400 is lower priced, smaller and permit slight more shift. Also the RS5000 is very interesting because it will allow essentially digital version of 8x10!!!

    Accordingly, I will much appreciate more info from those who have looked at accuracy of their systems for high resolving digital back. I use Leaf AFi-II 12 (80MP) and have no plan to upgrade to the iphone interface. I prefer to optically visualize an image:
    1. For normal work using an optical viewfinder.
    2. For tilt work:
    a) maximizing DOF can be per presets on tilt scale
    b) for e.g. three trees lined up 45 degree to camera using GG (this one use is similar to a Techno, the others are not)

    Notably for all 1~2a&b the precise tolerances and adjustment for back and sensor plane are very important.

    Anyone?

    Thanks!!!

    Best regards,
    Anders

  28. #28
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    Re: Cambo owners - shimming the back

    Reply from Schneider to my email questions on adjustment of tolerances;

    1. On Alpa permitting 1/100mm back shim adjustments vs. Cambo adjustment of screws on Scheider helical

    "Basically all remaining camera manufacturers work with the same precise tooling machinery and modern 3-d cad systems. That lead to accuracy down to less than 2/100 of a mm. At the end of the day the quality of a camera system is as good as the number of connections from lens to CCD plane because you cannot make any interface with zero tolerance."

    2. Alpa vs. Schneider preciseness

    "All manufacturers use shims, if they cannot readjust the tolerance by setting up the flange focal distance with the helical mount."

    3. To what tolerance can the Schneider helical be adjusted?

    "Less than 2/100 of a mm"

    4. On Alpa sending lenses to Schneider for adjustment but Cambo making adjustments in house

    "The adjustment of Schneider lenses combines a optical adjustment for the best lens performance as also an mechanical alignment for the infinity position with all the parts, tube, helical mount, shutter and lens in combination. Cambo has the equipment to to the mechanical alignment in their own factory because they have collimatiors and the tools for this alignment."



    Thus, seems Alpa sending lenses to Schneider adds an optical adjustment, over Cambos adjustment. Otherwise --- assuming that a sensor is in perfect parallel plane to the image plane from a camera/lens --- then it appears that it should be possible to adjust a Cambo system using the screws on the helical to same "perfect" tolerance as an Alpa system. In fact, that seems would require the Alpa system with its joints to be no less out of tolerance than the adjustment that is made on the Cambo using the screws on the Schneider helical (which of course is also used to adjust lenses on Alpa products). The bottom line however appear to be that infinity adjustment should be at least to within 2/100mm.

    A difference is also that Alpa uses sliding bearings, while Cambo uses sliding on rails. Per my understanding sliding bearings is more precise, but a question is if both in fact are are suffice and reliably such??


    Regarding GG; for Alpa it is adjusted in the factory to be assumably "perfect" in tolerance with the Alpa system, thus when the back interface is adjusted using shims both the lenses and GG will be within tolerance. The weakness of the Cambo system thus appear to be if one wants to be able to focus precise also using the GG, since there appear to be no way for a user to shim it!!! Or...

    -----> Does anyone know if it is possible and easy to add and subtract shims for the Cambo GG?


    On another note, the new Alpa 17mm tilt/swing adapter does not appear to have a scale for the amount of tilt applied [per Alpa website product photos].

    ------> Does anyone know if in fact there is a scale to readout the degrees tilt/shift applied?


    Thanks!

    Best regards,
    Anders

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